For the socially conservative wing of the GOP, their field of champions in the slate of 2016 hopefuls presents a problem. Like Highlander, there can be only one.

At the moment, there are a variety of candidates who can plausibly claim to uphold the values of traditional conservatives on issues like gay marriage and abortion. Only two candidates are, however, running explicitly on their socially conservative bona fides.

Considering that former Pennsylvania Sen. Rick Santorum exited the presidential race in 2012 with the most committed delegates after Mitt Romney, his fall from grace has been striking. In the last presidential cycle, Santorum won the popular vote in 11 states and emerged with the most delegates in six. Today, the former Keystone State senator barely registers in the polls.

His chief rival for the claim to being the most viable social conservative in the race, former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee, has enjoyed far more success. He regularly polls in the top tier of Republican presidential candidates. Though he has made the dubious determination that his pathway to the nomination will be secured by going to war against the pop singer Beyoncé Knowles and claiming that America is moving toward the “criminalization of Christianity,” his strategy has thus far been effective.

For both candidates, this weekend’s Faith & Freedom Coalition summit in Iowa presents an opportunity and a challenge. The Wall Street Journal suggests that both Santorum and Huckabee view this gathering of influential Iowans as a critical event for their campaigns:

“Santorum and Huckabee are the two who really have the most at stake,” said Sam Clovis, a Sioux City social conservative who placed second to Joni Ernst in Iowa’s 2014 GOP Senate primary. “Between Huckabee and Santorum, they need to come back and recapture some of that magic they had in ’12 and ’08.”

Altogether, nine Republicans likely to make 2016 presidential bids are scheduled to speak at Saturday’s Iowa Faith & Freedom Coalition Spring Kick-Off . The subtext for the event won’t be subtle: It is taking place at the evangelical Point of Grace megachurch in Waukee, a Des Moines suburb, and will attract the leading activists from Iowa’s social conservative community.

There is, however, another potential 2016 presidential candidate with a claim to represent social conservatism who has thus far flown under the radar: Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal. “Mr. Jindal got a head start Thursday, but in a venue more typically castigated by conservatives,” The Journal reported. “He took to the op-ed page of the New York Times to declare his firm opposition to same-sex marriage. Usually at these types of events the Times is held up as a voice of the liberal and coastal elite, not the place to make your argument to the conservative faithful.”

Jindal is a powerful public speaker and an articulate defender of traditional conservative values. Jindal owes his low profile and limited name recognition to the fact that he has never run for the presidency before, but that condition is easily remedied. In the race between Santorum and Huckabee, the stage is set for an upset.