As Ed Krayewski notes, he’s been in D.C. since Barack Obama was 11 years old, an unbroken stretch of influence over American decline that few politicians in U.S. history can match. Why shouldn’t he be the guy we put in charge to preside over the final collapse?

Run, Biden, run:

The economy. National security. Infrastructure. Education. These are just some of the issues our country faces going forward, with more challenges and opportunities added everyday. In this time of great change and uncertainty, America needs an experienced, steady hand on the wheel.

Vice President Joe Biden has more experience than any other candidate, or potential candidate, in the field. When he was elected to the Senate, he was one of the youngest Senators ever at twenty-nine. Now, with thirty-six years in Congress, and eight as Vice President, his institutional knowledge of the inner workings of Washington is unmatched. 

His years of experience are complemented by his passion for the issues, particularly foreign policy. From helping pass the new START treaty to playing an important role in ending the Iraq War, he has been on the forefront of every foreign policy issue for decades.  Concerning domestic policy, he’s focused on such key issues to our economy as affordable college and growth in the manufacturing industry.

Lotta ink has been spilled lately about how weird and unprecedented it is (in modern times, at least) for Democrats to have a prohibitive presidential frontrunner, capable of clearing the field, who’s not an incumbent president or VP herself. What makes that doubly weird, though, is the fact that the current VP, seen by many as a punchline, would instantly become a very credible candidate for them the moment Hillary says “I’ll pass.” How often does that happen? Who was the last guy to run for president who went from clown (albeit well-credentialed clown) to possible frontrunner literally overnight? And what makes this triply weird is that, on paper, Diamond Joe’s really not that bad of a pick, even apart from the advantage of name recognition that comes with incumbency. Go read Larry Sabato’s assessment of John Kerry as a potential Democratic dark horse candidate and ask yourself in which way he’s superior to Biden. They’re both extremely old by presidential standards, both have a showy (yet terrible) record on foreign policy, and unlike Kerry, Biden doesn’t have the taint of having lost a general election before. He’s at least as formidable as Kerry and certainly more formidable, if only for structural reasons, than a dial tone like Martin O’Malley. The only Democrat out there who might be able to bump him off in a Hillary-less race is Elizabeth Warren, and I’m not so sure even she could do it. The left will prefer her, but what about centrist Democrats and blue-collar voters who know Biden well and like him for his down-to-earth charm?

All I’m saying is it’s not capital-C Crazy that he might run and win and that we on the right might commit mass suicide afterward upon realizing that we couldn’t stop Joe Biden — Joe Biden — from being elected to Obama’s third term.