A couple weeks ago, I wrote about the sledding ban on Capitol Hill. It was enforced last snow storm, to the disappointment of many kids. We also discovered during that storm, you may have to know a Congressman or Senator to sled the hill:

You have to know someone to sled on a hill in this town. I wouldn’t be surprised if this is an unofficial way of getting around the rule, so both the quoted resident and quoted cop are technically correct. It’s so perfectly gross, so maybe I’m falling victim to confirmation bias. If you know a Senator, please use this publicly owned and funded land on which to have all the fun. Otherwise, go on home, hoi polloi, dragging your sled behind you slump-shouldered with Target bags on your tennis shoes.

Today, the people rose up and said “screw that”:

From sledding to snowball fights, dozens of children and their parents took to Capitol Hill Thursday afternoon to protest a controversial sledding ban.

Capitol Police have refused to lift the sledding ban, but some parents organized a “sled in” on the west lawn of the Capitol to put a spotlight on the unpopular rule.

The snow day provided ample opportunity for the children and their parents to challenge the sledding ban.

“This is a great day for sledding and democracy,” said Tim Krepp, a parent who helped organize the event.

Krepp said the sledding ban is a “silly problem” that points to the larger issue of dysfunction in Washington.

Among those calling to lift the sledding ban is Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton (D-D.C.), who wrote to U.S. Capitol Police Board Chairman Frank Larkin Wednesday.

Capitol Police pointed out that more than 20,000 sledding injuries occur in the U.S. each year. They denied her request to lift the ban, but officers on the ground also refused to enforce it.

“No enforcement of #sledding ban on Capitol Hill today,” Holmes-Norton tweeted. “Thank you Capitol Police!”

It’s turning into a public relations nightmare for those who oppose sledding and support the ban.

“No member of Congress wants to go on the record saying, ‘Yeah, I hate children. Let’s ban this,’ ” Krepp said.