I thought Mittmentum would be the topic du jour for the Sunday shows but I’m glad they’re (mostly) passing on it. It already feels played out. Instead “This Week” turns to a more interesting candidate in Mike Huckabee, whose influence in the primaries is now greater than it was 48 hours ago thanks to the Supreme Court. Most of the GOP field, from Jeb Bush to Scott Walker to Rand Paul to even Ted Cruz, would prefer to duck gay marriage by insisting it’s a matter for the states to decide, their own personal preference for traditional marriage notwithstanding. SCOTUS isn’t going to let them do that. And if any of them tries the ol’ “I disagree with the Court but this issue is now settled” dodge during the debates, Huckabee will be there to call them out. A Federal Marriage Amendment would un-settle the issue, after all. And if that’s not in the cards because too many states now support SSM, well, then the least each candidate can do is pledge to appoint Supreme Court justices who’ll overturn any precedents that legalize gay marriage. Huckabee will insist on it. How will the rest, especially Cruz, respond upon having their commitment to social conservatism challenged? If they take Huck’s side, their dream of avoiding this issue in the primaries so as to minimize it in the general election is over.

Expect Huckabee to also be asked about the return of his nemesis, Romney, and his ingenious decision to pick a fight with an entertainer who’s immensely popular with people in all sorts of electoral subgroups. If you’re not up for Huckabee, Marco Rubio will be on “Face the Nation” to explain what it’s like to watch Mitt Romney swipe his anti-poverty message right before another presidential run. And if you’re already sick of presidential politics, the editor-in-chief of Charlie Hebdo will appear on “Meet the Press” with a word or two for all of his new fair-weather friends. The full line-up is at the AP.