Awesome.

gallup-sore.jpg

Figure those numbers will decline by at least three-quarters after a bruising general campaign, but even so, seven percent of Hillary’s base voting GOP would be a tasty treat on Election Day. Her supporters, fittingly, are more sore loser-ish than Obama’s, breaking 59/28 for him over McCain versus 72/19 for Hillary over McCain among Obama voters. Which brings us to a serious strategic exit question: What’s the surest way to keep these losers sore? If the race drags on and she keeps losing, some of these people are going to become reconciled to the idea that Obama’s the legitimate nominee (which he is) and is worth supporting. If, however, she’s pressured to get out now, without a chance to win Pennsylvania and surprise in North Carolina and Indiana, the hard feelings at the thought of her being muscled out may linger. Which is to say, shouldn’t we start rooting for the Chosen Ones identified by Geraghty to throw their full-throated support to the Messiah, thereby effectively dooming her chances with the superdelegates and finally sending Hillary’s fans over the edge? Those Rasmussen results that Drudge is teasing should give them some encouragement.

And, supplemental exit question: Now more than ever?

Update: Her Majesty assures Time this morning that she’s not going anywhere. We’ll see. Phil Bredesen’s still pushing his idea of a “superdelegate primary,” which may look a little better to naysayers in the party in light of the Gallup numbers. How would that play with the sore losers, though?

Update: Here’s the aforementioned Rasmussen poll. A solid 62% don’t want either candidate out and only 47% of Obama’s own supporters want Hillary out, which may complicate things for the Chosen Ones. Anyone want to try explaining the logic of the 22% who think Obama should quit?

Also, nuance: “Six percent (6%) of Democrats would like both Clinton and Obama to drop out of the race.”