If you’ve been reading Jihad Watch or listening to Robert Spencer, you’ve been learning about these plans for years now. But I’d venture to say that most people are just now learning of the Muslim Brotherhood’s long term goals in the US, which include replacing the Constitution with sharia law. The plans have been introduced as evidence in the ongoing Holy Land Foundation trial, in which the Council on American Islamic Relations has been named an unindicted co-conspirator.

Amid the mountain of evidence released in the Holy Land Foundation terrorism financing trial, the most provocative has turned out to be a handful of previously classified evidence detailing Islamist extremists’ ambitious plans for a U.S. takeover…

The documents – introduced in recent weeks as part of the prosecution’s case in the trial of the now defunct Holy Land Foundation and five of its organizers – lay out the Brotherhood’s plans in chillingly stark terms.

A 1991 strategy paper for the Brotherhood, often referred to as the Ikhwan in Arabic, found in the Virginia home of an unindicted co-conspirator in the case, describes the group’s U.S. goals, referred to as a “civilization-jihadist process.”

“The Ikhwan must understand that their work in America is a kind of grand jihad in eliminating and destroying the Western civilization from within and sabotaging its miserable house by their hands and the hands of the believers so that it is eliminated and God’s religion is made victorious over all other religions,” it states. This process requires a “mastery of the art of ‘coalitions,’ the art of ‘absorption’ and the principles of ‘cooperation.’ ”

Success in the U.S. “in establishing an observant Islamic base with power and effectiveness will be the best support and aid to the global movement,” it states.

A transcript of a Brotherhood orientation meeting recorded in the early 1980s includes discussions of the need for “securing the group” from infiltration by “Zionism, Masonry … the CIA, FBI, etc. so that we find out if they are monitoring us” and “how can we get rid of them.” Discussions later turn to “weapons training at the Ikhwan’s camps” in Oklahoma and Missouri.

It would be nice to know whose Virginia home held those documents.

The Muslim Brotherhood is the parent organization of Hamas, formed in 1987 in the Palestinian territories to combat Israeli occupation. The Brotherhood remains active in many parts of the world, dedicated to increasing fundamentalist Islamic influence. A key goal is to place nations under Shariah.

The Muslim Brotherhood is also the organization that attracted Dr. Ayman al-Zawahiri to the jihad, and is the ideological fountainhead of al Qaeda. Al Qaeda is the more militant of the two — the Brotherhood participates in Egyptian elections, for instance, while al Qaeda prefers threatening the Iraqi elections — but their goals are the same. They want to re-establish the caliphate and usher in an Islam-dominated world.

Hopefully as this information emerges in the Holy Land trial, it’ll wake up a few people in Washington.

Back to the article, for some useful history on the Brotherhood.

The Muslim Brotherhood was formed in Egypt in the 1920s by Islamists seeking to install a fundamentalist government there. Islamist radicals today still idolize the martyr Sayyid Qutb, the Brotherhood’s most influential thinker.

While attending college in the U.S. in the late 1940s, Mr. Qutb was appalled by what he perceived as the nation’s lack of piousness and morality.

In the early 1950s, he was jailed in Egypt, where he had worked to overthrow the secular government of Gamal Abdel Nasser. Before he was executed in 1966, he penned a scathing indictment of American culture that called for worldwide rejection of Western values.

His writings are still credited with radicalizing countless young Muslims, including Ayman al-Zawahiri. He became al-Qaeda’s No. 2 leader and the spiritual guide to Osama bin Laden.

The Muslim Brotherhood in Egypt says that it broke from its violent past in the 1970s and now favors backing Islamist candidates in the more than 70 countries where it has branches. However, the branches operate as independent groups with differing views on the role of violence, and experts say they frequently squabble over strategy, ideology and direction.

“Al-Qaeda and the Muslim Brotherhood are working toward the same goal, but the Brotherhood is willing to work through it politically and take their time,” said Mr. Farah, the counterterrorism consultant. “They want an Islamic state. Does that mean they’re going to pick up a gun and start shooting at the [U.S.] president? No. They’re going to work the system.”

The U.S. is among the countries where the Brotherhood has sought to spread its message, according to Department of Justice prosecutors in the Holy Land case.

Prosecutors say that the Brotherhood was behind the Palestinian Committee, formed in the U.S. in the 1980s.

The Palestinian Committee was led by was Mousa Abu Marzook, former head of Hamas and now its No. 2 political chief. He has been designated as a terrorist by the U.S., and was closely tied to the Holy Land Foundation, according to evidence presented at the trial.

Mr. Marzook provided tens of thousands of dollars to the foundation, which also gave money back to charities that the government alleges are controlled by Hamas.

Mr. Marzook is also related by marriage to former Holy Land board chairman Ghassan Elashi, who along with his brothers has been convicted in prior trials of engaging in illegal business with Mr. Marzook.

The goal of the Palestinian Committee, which trial documents indicate existed in the late 1980s and early 1990s, was to raise money in the U.S. to fund Hamas.

This was to be accomplished by forming a complex network of seemingly benign Muslim organizations whose real job, according to the government, was to spread militant propaganda and raise money.

The Muslim Brotherhood created some American Muslim groups and sought influence in others, many of which are listed as unindicted co-conspirators in the Holy Land case.

On the list are several prominent groups, including the Islamic Society of North America, the North American Islamic Trust and the Council on American-Islamic Relations. All have protested their inclusion on the list.

Emphasis added. I just didn’t want anyone to miss it.

More: See also this great, incisive look at the Brotherhood campaign plan documents at American Thinker.