He hit five construction workers along Rt 29 in Burtonsville, MD and then fled the scene. Two of the five have now died.

A second construction worker has died from his injuries after a van slammed into five construction workers on Route 29.

Montgomery County Police say 37-year-old James Cronin of Glen Burnie died Tuesday. On Monday, Cronin was flown to the University of Maryland Shock Trauma Center in Baltimore, in critical condition with life-threatening injuries.

Police say the driver of the van, 31-year-old Manuel De Jesus Gonzalez-Geronimo, turned himself in at around 12:30 a.m. Tuesday.

Gonzalez-Geronimo, of Hyattsville, was charged with failure to immediately return and remain at the scene of a collision involving death, failure to immediately stop a vehicle at the scene of a collision involving bodily injury, and driving without a license.

He is being held without bond at the Montgomery County Detention Center. Police say Gonzalez-Geronimo could face additional charges.

Prosecutors say Gonzalez-Geronimo has also admitted to being in the country illegally for seven years. He is originally from Guatemala.

Another construction worker, 30-year-old Martin Ruffin of Baltimore, was killed and three other men injured when the van plowed through a construction site.

There may be more people involved in the crash who haven’t come forward yet.

After the crash, police say Gonzalez-Geronimo jumped out of the van and ran into a wooded area off of Route 29. Police believe there may have been other people in the van who also fled.

Video report on the incident here, and additional coverage here and here.

Update: Here’s a story with a familiar ending from Houston. This one ends with a family of three, wiped out. The youngest was a 2-year-old boy.

Down in comments, mjgreco wishes someone would track crimes committed in the US by illegal aliens. Well, they tried that in Texas until the press got wind of it, and spineless officials ran for cover.

The Texas Department of Public Safety tracked state troopers’ encounters with illegal immigrants for two years as part of a program to gauge the state’s immigration situation, a spokesman said.

Critics of the program said the agency may have gathered the information illegally by asking people about their immigration status. They also questioned whether the data was built on racial profiling.

After receiving questions about it from The Dallas Morning News, the agency said last week that the program was being stopped. The newspaper learned about the program through an open records request.

The “gathering of this data was designed to be a temporary snapshot of the situation. This has been accomplished and the numbers are inconclusive,” DPS spokesman Tom Vinger said in a written statement.

The study, which began in June 2005, had troopers document the number of stops that involved illegal immigrants; the number of them released with no action; the number of them released to immigration authorities; and the number jailed. Regional reports were submitted monthly to the Highway Patrol chief.

The usual race grievance mongers got in the game, which sealed the program’s fate.