According to the Times of London:

Al-Zarqawi’s second wife Israa, in her late teens, and their 18-month-old baby, Abdul Rahman, died in the strike, Jordanian officials told The Times. Israa was the daughter of Yassin Jarrad, a Palestinian Islamic militant, who is blamed for the killing in 2004 of Ayatollah Muhammad Baqr al-Hakim, the Iraqi Shia leader.

ToL says that of the six people killed in the attack, three were women. Palestinian terrorists are known to surround themselves with women and children in order to deter IAF missile strikes; I wonder if this sack was using his wife and baby boy the same way.

Update: Now here’s something weird. Supposedly, the key to this whole sting was the intel we’d recently obtained about Zarqawi’s “spiritual advisor,” Sheikh Abdul al-Rahman. He’s the one who allegedly (and inadvertently) led us to the safe house and, according to the U.S. military, ended up dying there alongside Z-man and the rest.

But if all that’s true, why is his name being signed to posts announcing Zarqawi’s death on jihadi websites?

One terrorism expert wondered if it was a case of mistaken identity.

“My perception is that if they released a statement in the name of Abu Abdul-Rahman al-Iraqi, then he is still around and, as the deputy head of Al Qaeda in Iraq, he presumably is the new leader,” Evan Kohlmann, a New York-based terror consultant and founder of globalterroralert.com, told The Associated Press.

“It is possible that two guys have the same name … Abu Abdul-Rahman al-Iraqi has never been identified as a spiritual leader, always as a military leader.”

I’m sure Michelle’s readers don’t need me to remind them that “Abdul Rahman” isn’t an uncommon Muslim name.

Update: ABC News says they’re probably two different guys:

The spiritual adviser was initially believed to be Abu Abdul-Rahman al-Iraqi, but analysts said al-Iraqi is a different man the group’s deputy leader who signed the al-Qaida statement announcing al-Zarqawi’s death.