Finally, those who avoided mentioning the law completely did so, by and large, because they didn’t want the association. The list also includes several members who posted basic information about the law, such as fact sheets or dates of enrollment, without actually taking a position.

So what overall lessons can be drawn from the data?

For starters, Senate Democratic candidates are far less likely to associate themselves or advocate for Obamacare than their House counterparts. That’s because they have to appeal to a wider swath of voters, many in states where the law is deeply unpopular or hamstrung by problems with a state exchange, rather than (often gerrymandered) House districts. But even some of the more progressive-minded Senate candidates, like Sens. Tom Udall (D-N.M.), Chris Coons (D-Del.) and Brian Schatz (D-Hawaii), avoided Obamacare on their campaign websites.