Anti-social behavior we’ll always be with us. It’s the accompanying sermons that stick in the craw. “I’m not stealing copyrighted material — I’m just liberating information that wants to be free.” “I’m not trafficking in smut. I’m drawing attention to the serious problem of excess alcohol consumption by young women on spring break.” “I’m not enabling the next Sirhan Sirhan. I’m materializing freedom.”

Milan Kundera savagely mocked this version of libertarianism in his novel, Immortality.

“Because people in the West are not threatened by concentration camps and are free to say and write what they want, the more the fight for human rights gains in popularity, the more it loses any concrete content, becoming a kind of universal stance of everyone toward everything, a kind of energy that turns all human desires into rights,” he wrote. “The world has become man’s right and everything in it has become a right: the desire for love the right to love, the desire for rest the right to rest, the desire for friendship the right to friendship, the desire to exceed the speed limit the right to exceed the speed limit, the desire for happiness the right to happiness, the desire to publish a book the right to publish a book, the desire to shout in the street in the middle of the night the right to shout in the street.”

One could add: the desire to shoot, the right to shoot.