Wayne Klinkel said his golden retriever, Sundance, ate five $100 bills when he was left unattended in the car for a few minutes. …

For the next several days, Klinkel followed Sundance around outside his daughter’s Colorado home with a pair of rubber gloves and plastic baggies. From his past experience picking up after the dog, he knew the paper would probably exit the animal undigested. …

He took the pieced-together bills to various local banks to have them replaced. The banks refused, but referred him to the U.S. Treasury Department’s Bureau of Engraving and Printing, where his request is apparently less unusual than it sounds.

“We get an enormous amount of mutilated currency cases each year,” the spokeswoman, who declined to be identified, told TODAY. “As long as you have 51 percent of the bill, our examiners work to make sure that the bill identified is genuine, and then you’ll receive a check in the mail once the case is closed.”