The NRA trotted out its own Sandy Hook parent at the event. Mark Mattioli didn’t cry or even shake during his brief remarks. “As parents, we send our kids off to school. There are expectations. In Sandy Hook, those expectations weren’t met,” he said. “I think politics need to be set aside here. This is recommendations for real solutions, solutions that will make our kids safer.” …

When it comes to armed personnel, the NRA task force recommends using “school resource officers” who undergo 40 to 60 hours of training, but only if the school wants them. In fact, pretty much everything the task force is recommending is voluntary. If you don’t like it, you don’t have to do it. “The presence of armed security personnel in a school adds a layer of security,” Hutchinson said. “But one, the decision is locally made, and two, some schools may decide not to go in that direction.”

That was the most controversial part of Hutchinson’s presentation. Journalists hoping for something juicier tried to liven things up, but he was unwilling to answer questions about the NRA’s position on background checks or high-capacity ammunition clips. He was graceful about it, though. “Our whole effort is about school safety. We talk about things that will keep children safer in schools,” he said.