Amash emerged as a potential U.S. Senate candidate one day after Paul’s filibuster, when Sen. Carl Levin, D-Mich., announced he will not seek reelection in 2014. Thanks to Michigan’s mediocre Republican bench and his headline-grabbing habits in the House, Amash instantly became the subject of speculation, and not without reason: Strategists in both parties agree he’s in a strong position to secure the GOP nomination. …

Amash also has the ability to attract serious money. Already, one libertarian super PAC has pledged to spend upward of $1 million to help him get elected, and others would likely follow (Club for Growth would surely spend big on his behalf). The ability to attract such substantial outside assistance makes Amash an intimidating contender, and could send other Republicans running from a primary challenge. “If that money comes through, that’s a big benefit,” said former Michigan GOP Chairman Saul Anuzis, another potential candidate. “Look, this is going to cost $2 million to $3 million in the primary, and another $10 million to $15 million in a general election. So if there are people who are willing to put that kind of money behind him, that makes a big difference.”

But it’s not just the money. Energy and enthusiasm are essential commodities in primary politics, and they emanate from the grassroots activists who prefer insurgent candidates like Amash. It is very difficult to imagine such organic support materializing for the likes of Anuzis, Land, or even House Intelligence Committee Chairman Mike Rogers, who is also considering a bid.