Bloomberg “can’t spend enough of his $27 billion to try to impose his will on the American public,” LaPierre said on NBC’s Meet the Press. “They don’t want him in their restaurants, they don’t want him in their homes, they don’t want him telling what food to eat. They sure don’t want him telling what self-defense firearms to own. He can’t buy America.”

Fresh off a court setback in his controversial ban on large soda drinks in New York City, a move that has been mocked by conservatives, a bruised Bloomberg might not be the best person to carry the mantel for gun-control advocates. The blunt-spoken billionaire mayor may be popular in Washington and New York, but that popularity might not extend to other areas of the country.

“He has zero effectiveness, he has none,” said one Republican strategist who asked to remain anonymous because of his ties to Bloomberg. “It’s a twofer: He’s a big-city mayor—and not just any big-city mayor, New York—and you have the nanny-in-chief of America…. He is so antagonistic that he’s probably displacing Dianne Feinstein amongst NRA loyalists.”