The Shooter is self-sufficient, as you’d imagine. He took pains to tell the legislators at each of the gatherings that he was not in D.C. to ask for help for himself — “It’s not about me,” he said in each meeting — but for colleagues and friends who are still in and concerned about the approaching end of their service. After six months with minimal income (as the story reports), he’s been doing a form of consulting that is making him a living. …

During each meeting, the Shooter and the members of the group accompanying him presented the legislators with a three-part proposal for easing the transition out of the military for elite forces that would require no legislation.

• A tiered pension plan that would begin after five years of duty and vary depending on base pay and length of service.

• Enhanced transition services that must be provided on an “opt-out” basis to overcome the fact that many vets are unaware that such services exist or how to apply for them and to include 18 months of comprehensive health insurance available immediately for vets and their families. …

In every meeting I attended, the senators, representatives, and their staffs were receptive — in many cases eager to help. …

But it was illuminating to hear what the roadblocks to change will be. While most legislators were entirely attuned to the unique and uniquely punishing demands put on special operators like SEALs, creating a special category of benefits, even if it applies to the elite Special Operations Forces of all branches of the military, will be difficult.