1. It would give Republicans instant fodder for a counterattack. The issue now is that GOP congressional leaders want spending cuts in exchange for raising the debt limit. Obama has said he is not negotiating, and that Congress must allow the nation to meet its obligations. …

2. It would take the focus off of Congress. The main thrust of Obama’s news conference, at least on the debt ceiling issue, was Congress, Congress, Congress. He was basically telling Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) and House Speaker John Boehner (R-Ohio) that the ball is in their court, and so are the consequences for not acting. Talking up his own plans would only ease pressure on them. …

3. It would fuel executive power grab attacks. Even the idea of Obama acting unilaterally if Congress doesn’t raise the debt ceiling is enough to rile up some conservatives to attack the president for overreaching. Being thrust into that kind of argument before the ceiling is hit is not helpful to the president, nor is it helpful to vulnerable Democrats in Congress who face tough reelection bids in 2014 — and whose votes the president will be counting on.