Cantor and McCarthy both informed Boehner of their decisions prior to the vote, and waited until after the bill had gotten the needed 218 votes to pass the House. Budget Chairman Paul Ryan, who along with McCarthy and Cantor make up the so-called “Young Guns” was also expected to break with Boehner prior to the vote, but at the last minute he apparently changed his mind and voted for passage, a Republican source said.

Following the vote, Ryan told Buzzfeed, “When you like something, you vote for it. …I wasn’t afraid.” He said he thought the deal reflected conservative values.

In a statement released by his office later, Ryan was more forceful in defense of his vote, noting that while he had concerns “Will the American people be better off if this law passes relative to the alternative? In the final analysis, the answer is undoubtedly yes. I came to Congress to make tough decisions—not to run away from them.”