Two years ago, one of China’s most successful investment bankers broke away from his meetings in Berlin to explore a special exhibit that had caught his eye: “Hitler and the Germans: Nation and Crime.” In the basement of the German History Museum, He Di watched crowds uneasily coming to terms with how their ancestors had embraced the Nazi promise of “advancement, prosperity and the reinstatement of former national grandeur,” as the curators wrote in their introduction to the exhibit. He, vice-chairman of investment banking at the Swiss firm UBS, found the exhibition so enthralling, and so disturbing for the parallels he saw with back home, that he spent three days absorbing everything on Nazi history that he could find.

“I saw exactly how Hitler combined populism and nationalism to support Nazism,” He told me in an interview in Beijing. “That’s why the neighboring countries worry about China’s situation. All these things we also worry about.” On returning to China he sharpened the mission statement at the think tank he founded in 2007 and redoubled its ideological crusade.