Obeidi, however, has examined the details and believes that the assault was a sophisticated, preplanned operation, and that Ambassador Christopher Stevens might himself have been the target. Stevens, who was popular among rebel leaders as the sole American diplomat stationed in Benghazi during the revolution, was initially believed to have been caught in the attack through sheer bad luck. But Obeidi says he believes armed militant groups had scoped out the consulate, and knew of Stevens’ whereabouts…

But besides the possible ineptitude of some officials, Obeidi believes that some elements of Libya’s law-enforcement structures were themselves involved in the attack, essentially compromising any probe of the details. The lack of investigation, he said, is “because of the suspected implication of some of the members of Benghazi’s law enforcement and security services who belong to or sympathize with extremist movements.” The man named as the main suspect, Ahmed Abu Khattala, leader of the Islamist organization Ansar al-Sharia, has not been arrested, and in October, conducted interviews in a Benghazi hotel with the New York Times and Reuters. When a reporter from McClatchy Newspapers this week asked a militia commander in Benghazi why Khattala had not been arrested, he said that if he arrested him, “a member of his forces will get him out.”