“These religious parties have strong ideological links to the Taliban. Conceptually there is not much difference between them. They want to control the state and take up jihad against the West,” said Ijaz Khattak, a professor at the University of Peshawar who knows Yousafzai and her father, and a member of Swat’s peace jirga, or tribal council…

On Wednesday morning, Pakistan’s top military official, Chief of Army Staff Gen. Ashfaq Parvez Kayani, became the country’s first national leader to visit Yousafzai, who is being treated at a military hospital in Peshawar for gunshot wounds to the head and neck. Kayani, arguably Pakistan’s most powerful man, called the shooting “inhuman” and a “heinous act of terrorism.”…

The only statement from a religious group condemning the attack came from the Majlis-e Wahdat-e Muslimeen, a Shiite party that holds seats in Parliament.