As one University of Minnesota undergraduate student explained the rising GPA trend when evaluating a professor known as a rigorous grader, “We live in a grade-inflated world.” That University of Minnesota anthropology professor Karen-Sue Taussig suspects that today’s “grade-inflated world” can be traced to the growing cost of a college degree, i.e. today’s “tuition-inflated world.” As Taussig told the Star Tribune, “They’re paying for it, and they worked really hard, and they put in time, and therefore they think they should get a good grade.”

Last year, Professor Rojstaczer and co-author Christopher Healy published a research article in the Teachers College Record titled “Where A Is Ordinary: The Evolution of American College and University Grading, 1940–2009.” The main conclusion of the paper appears below (emphasis added), and is illustrated by the chart below showing the rising share of A letter grades over time at American colleges, from 15% in 1940 to 43% by 2008. Starting in about 1998, the letter grade A became the most common college grade.