Green Room

Breaking: NFL star a … fiscal conservative?

posted at 4:29 pm on August 27, 2013 by

Although I am a die-hard Pittsburgh Steelers fan, I like the Houston Texans running back Arian Foster … as long as he’s not playing against the Steelers.  He provided a refreshing honesty and wit on his Twitter feed until he shut it down earlier this year (more’s the pity), and apparently when speaking in public, too.  When asked by a fan at an event to name the best part of living in Texas, Foster replied like a true conservative (via Mike Shelton at Watchdog):

The highlight of the event occurred when fan questions were delivered to Texans including Arian Foster, Brian Cushing and J.J. Watt.

Foster continued to wage a one-man battle to improve the intelligence of questions directed at athletes, joking, “That’s a bad question, man,” after a weak initial query was submitted.

“We’ve got to hold people accountable,” a laughing Foster said. …

But Foster stole the show when a question concerning the “Best thing about living in Houston” was submitted.

“There’s no state tax in Houston,” Foster said.

Based on his old Twitter chatter, I think it would be safer to say that Foster has a nuanced view of politics, but probably leans libertarian-conservative.  He certainly has a healthy business sense, anyway.

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“There’s no state tax in Houston,” Foster said.

Yeah, but school and local property taxes are ridiculous.

Hat Trick on August 27, 2013 at 4:32 PM

Yeah, but school and local property taxes are ridiculous.

Hat Trick on August 27, 2013 at 4:32 PM

They’re really bad out here in Katy, but at least the public schools are good.

The lack of a state income tax here in Texas definitely attracts a lot of professional athletes(although that doesn’t mean they’re all about to start voting Republican). I wouldn’t be surprised if it was a factor in Dwight Howard signing with the Rockets over the Lakers.

Doughboy on August 27, 2013 at 4:41 PM

Charles “Peanut” Tillman of Da Bears had a moment like that a few years ago after he signed his first multimillion dollar contract.

(paraphrased) “Holy $h!t! I’m going to pay how much in taxes? That’s just crazy.”

JimLennon on August 27, 2013 at 4:53 PM

Hat Trick on August 27, 2013 at 4:32 PM

yep, about $5k for just under 2,000 sf on an acre and half in town, you never own your home in Texas

DanMan on August 27, 2013 at 5:07 PM

I’m sure most professional athletes become somewhat fiscally conservative after realizing how much they have to pay in taxes, including taxes they pay to each city and state government while playing on the road.

supernova on August 27, 2013 at 5:08 PM

Yeah, but school and local property taxes are ridiculous.

Hat Trick on August 27, 2013 at 4:32 PM

Don’t complain so hard about the property taxes in Texas. I moved to Texas three years ago and bought a 2500 square foot house on 3 acres in New Braunfels. I pay about $7000/year property tax.

Compare that with what I left in California. I had a 2800 square foot house on 1/4 acre 30 miles east of San Francisco. I paid $7800/year property taxes. That was on top of the $20-25 thousand in yearly State Income Tax!

And, yes, the State Income Tax situation was one of the motivating factors in coming to Texas.

NOMOBO on August 27, 2013 at 5:38 PM

I don’t know the man’s politics, but not wanting to pay excessive tax isn’t merely a conservative or libertarian thing. In fact, the only people who call for increased taxes are those who don’t pay any, and those who are compensated with federal grants or tax breaks in other areas to make up for any increase they face on a personal level.

BKeyser on August 27, 2013 at 7:03 PM

Does Texas still have that retail sales tax holiday just before school starts? Man, I miss Texas.

You don’t want to know what I pay in various taxes in Illinois… :-(

Fallon on August 27, 2013 at 7:04 PM

Hat Trick on August 27, 2013 at 4:32 PM

NOMOBO on August 27, 2013 at 5:38 PM

I’ve always heard how great it is for the states with no income tax, but I would like to see the total numbers. There’s a trade-off on sales and property taxes.

In Colorado, I pay about $2200 / year in property taxes on a 4500 sf house on a standard suburban lot (less than 1/4 acre), about a 4.3% state income tax, and in my area total sales tax burden is about 7.3%.
Compared to what you guys say about the property taxes in Texas, and other states, I think Colorado looks pretty good in a straight up total dollar value comparison.

dentarthurdent on August 27, 2013 at 7:52 PM

A lot of individuals consider themselves quite “progressive” and “forward-thinking” until it comes to the part where they have to accept government confiscation and redistribution. It all depends on whose oxen are being gored.

gryphon202 on August 27, 2013 at 9:25 PM

I’ve always heard how great it is for the states with no income tax, but I would like to see the total numbers. There’s a trade-off on sales and property taxes.

dentarthurdent on August 27, 2013 at 7:52 PM

Not necessarily. Most of the states that have property taxes also have income tax. And in my home state of South Dakota (no income tax, modest property tax compared to, say, California), the counties now have to opt out individually to raise property taxes more than a certain percentage set by the state, usually indexed to inflation.

gryphon202 on August 27, 2013 at 9:36 PM

When these athletes travel to other municipalities to play a game(work), they must pay local tax for moneys earned there correct?

Murphy9 on August 27, 2013 at 9:47 PM

gryphon202 on August 27, 2013 at 9:36 PM

That’s kind of where I was going with my comments. It depends on your particular income level and how each state/county/city puts it all together.
If you’re in a very high income bracket, no income tax is a good deal, as long as you don’t go crazy on a house/property and end up getting socked that way.
For those of us in lesser income brackets, like under $100K, there’s a trade-off. A few years ago, a company I worked for talked about moving me to Omaha, and insisted I didn’t need a pay raise / cost of living adjustment because housign was cheaper. However, when I looked into it, I found I could get a comparable house a little cheaper, but the property taxes would be 4 times what I pay here, and state income tax is double what I pay in Colorado. I told the company to forget about moving me.

dentarthurdent on August 27, 2013 at 9:54 PM

People are only socialists with other people’s money.

Ronnie on August 28, 2013 at 12:52 AM

They’re really bad out here in Katy, but at least the public schools are good.

Doughboy on August 27, 2013 at 4:41 PM

I had family there for awhile. Katy is amazing for raising a family. The schools are a full year ahead of the ones in Colorado.

John the Libertarian on August 28, 2013 at 1:00 AM

Its a shame the only conservatism they can muster is when of hits their pocketbook. I’m remembering Will Smiths shock in France when he found out on a talk show what they pay. He’s certainly not conservative or even libertarian. He just likes to keep his money.

smoothsailing on August 28, 2013 at 8:33 AM

Hat Trick on August 27, 2013 at 4:32 PM
NOMOBO on August 27, 2013 at 5:38 PM

My prior place in Chicago’s suburbs was 2750 sq ft – $12,000/year property tax. And 8.75% sales tax. And 5% income tax.

Yay for Illinois.

krome on August 28, 2013 at 11:00 AM

Arian Foster has always liked Ron Paul, which would explain his answer.

Pitchforker on August 28, 2013 at 3:02 PM

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zAmfsVkjfLU

Pitchforker on August 28, 2013 at 3:04 PM