Green Room

Video: Asiana Airlines to sue over Wi Tu Lo

posted at 1:05 pm on July 15, 2013 by

Don’t be too critical of this decision. After botching the landing nine days ago, Asiana Airlines will need all the revenue they can get:

Asiana Airlines announced Monday that it was going to sue a San Francisco TV station that it said damaged the airline’s reputation by using bogus and racially offensive names for four pilots on a plane that crashed earlier this month in San Francisco.

An anchor for KTVU-TV read the names on the air Friday and then apologized after a break. The report was accompanied by a graphic with the phony names listed alongside a photo of the burned-out plane that had crashed at San Francisco International Airport on July 6, killing three and injuring dozens.

Well, good luck with that. They’ll need to convince a court that four fake pilot names did more damage to their reputation than having the real four pilots somehow miss the fact that they’d almost stalled a Boeing 777 with more than 200 people on board. Besides, with the NTSB admitting that an intern provided confirmation, it’s going to be difficult to prove malpractice, let alone injury.

Update: They didn’t actually stall the plane, as a commenter reminds me, but they were going too slow and coming in too low.

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Yu Su Me?

faraway on July 15, 2013 at 1:11 PM

Mi Su Yu.

gryphon202 on July 15, 2013 at 1:19 PM

Didn’t some of these people die? Maybe I’m not as conservative as I thought, but they should sue over this.

earlgrey133 on July 15, 2013 at 1:20 PM

Jeebus, Ed:

They didn’t stall the plane. If they had, the crash would have been much worse. They simply came in too low and slow, and landed short.

A stall means your wing no longer generates lift. If that happens the plane drops like a rock, and it would likely roll or pitch, which would have caused a catastrophic accident.

As far as them suing, it is laughable. Obviously the news made a mistake because someone trolled them, and no harm was done.

kaltes on July 15, 2013 at 1:21 PM

Alternate headline:

Sharknado Alert: Asiana Airlines tries to deflect blame by blaming TV studio.

Kingfisher on July 15, 2013 at 1:31 PM

Because nothing ensures that many more people who missed this fairly harmless, albeit tasteless, prank will see it as when they bring a lawsuit.

SailorMark on July 15, 2013 at 1:36 PM

KTVU needs to call a lawyer from the Obama admin. They’re experts on the incompetence defense.

RadClown on July 15, 2013 at 1:53 PM

Asiana represented in this case by attorney Waiyu Nosu, esq.

JimLennon on July 15, 2013 at 1:55 PM

The slurred report is actually fairly accurate. That’s going to be a problem for Asiana’s countless other trials.

Capitalist Hog on July 15, 2013 at 1:59 PM

Yu Su Me?

faraway on July 15, 2013 at 1:11 PM

Mi Su Yu.

gryphon202 on July 15, 2013 at 1:19 PM

Wi Su Tu

RadClown on July 15, 2013 at 2:12 PM

NTSB blames an intern, promises changes.

They wouldn’t release the intern’s name, but we all know his initials are B.S.

TexasDan on July 15, 2013 at 2:25 PM

If the plane was not in a stall, they were pretty close to it. By accounts I’ve read they were 40 knots below the target speed for landing, and way too low. Not having an ILS is no excuse. The weather was good, good visibility, and the runway does have a PAPI to aid pilots on a visual approach.

Both Korean air carriers have dismal safety records, and part of the problem is training, and the other part is the macho culture that prevails in the Korean aviation industry. The whole concept of crew resource management is very foreign in the Korean culture. Rule 1.) captain is always right. And rule 2.) when captain is mistaken, refer to rule #1. This is a good way to kill a lot of people, but that seems to be the way things are done in the ROK.

simkeith on July 15, 2013 at 2:35 PM

Was this over Macho Grande?

Oil Can on July 15, 2013 at 2:38 PM

I’ll never get over Macho Grande.

simkeith on July 15, 2013 at 2:55 PM

Oil Can and simkeith – well played.

Below the fold: NTSB summer intern slated to replace Jay Carney.

sulla on July 15, 2013 at 3:43 PM

I’ll never get over Macho Grande.

simkeith on July 15, 2013 at 2:55 PM

You’re too low, damnit!!!!!

Kafir on July 15, 2013 at 3:47 PM

Update: They didn’t actually stall the plane, as a commenter reminds me, but they were going too slow and coming in too low.

Tu lo.

Arnold Yabenson on July 15, 2013 at 3:56 PM

Yu Su Me?

faraway on July 15, 2013 at 1:11 PM

Mi Su Yu.

gryphon202 on July 15, 2013 at 1:19 PM

Wi Su Tu

RadClown on July 15, 2013 at 2:12 PM

Yoo Pae Now

But seriously, they do so much worse to English over there…we used to call South Korea ‘the land of the not quite right’ when I was living there.

James on July 15, 2013 at 4:15 PM

The unnamed intern, was that Janet “Reno” Napolitano’s son?

patch on July 15, 2013 at 4:27 PM

Didn’t some of these people die? Maybe I’m not as conservative as I thought, but they should sue over this.

earlgrey133 on July 15, 2013 at 1:20 PM

The peopled died because Asiana Airlines’ pilot crashed the plane, not because of some dopey joke. The Airlines reputation was likely damage more by the crash than by the joke that relatively few people heard about compared to the crash.

Kjeil on July 15, 2013 at 5:32 PM

James on July 15, 2013 at 4:15 PM

I retract my last post, on the advice of my own attorney, Li Ti Jus. However, I know that will never be enough for some people, so
I will be going into hiding…I must consult my travel agent, whose name is Pak Bag Soon.

James on July 15, 2013 at 5:40 PM

But seriously, they do so much worse to English over there…we used to call South Korea ‘the land of the not quite right’ when I was living there.

James on July 15, 2013 at 4:15 PM

When I was there, we always called South Korea, “the land of almost perfect”. Because they were always trying to sell shabby goods that were not quite right.

simkeith on July 15, 2013 at 5:40 PM

So, summer intern “confirmed” the names. Well, who generated the false names for the ignorant, inexperienced intern to confirm? Looks like NTSB has more than one joker.

RoyalFlush on July 15, 2013 at 6:15 PM

I truly feel very badly for the victims of this tragedy-it’s so very sad and my prayers go out to their loved ones, and I’m extremely relieved that the vast majority of passengers survived. Also, the news station that jumped on this and was made to look stupid got what they deserved.

That being said:

Video: Asiana Airlines to sue over Wi Tu Lo

That’s pretty damn funny.

Dr. ZhivBlago on July 15, 2013 at 7:09 PM

I don’t know about lawsuits, but heads ought to roll at the TV station and at the NTSB. What a bunch of boneheads!!

SagebrushPuppet on July 15, 2013 at 7:22 PM

I think Asiana should focus on the damage that they and they alone have inflicted.
They should focus on how they can possibly explain flying a Boing 777 into a sea wall on a severe clear day with or without a glide slope.

(ATP with 18,000 + hours, formerly SFO based)

timgibbonz on July 15, 2013 at 7:50 PM

That Sum Ting Wong fellow should sue now that people think he’s associated with Asiana.

Ronnie on July 15, 2013 at 10:45 PM

I don’t know about lawsuits, but heads ought to roll at the TV station and at the NTSB. What a bunch of boneheads!!

SagebrushPuppet on July 15, 2013 at 7:22 PM

Maybe they should have this handled by their public relations specialist, Wi Fuk Dup.

James on July 16, 2013 at 12:06 AM

Maybe they should have this handled by their public relations specialist, Wi Fuk Dup.

James on July 16, 2013 at 12:06 AM

Okay, that’s funny right there. Bwahahhahaha!

Splashman on July 16, 2013 at 12:51 AM

NTSB blames an intern, promises changes.

They wouldn’t release the intern’s name, but we all know his initials are B.S.

TexasDan on July 15, 2013 at 2:25 PM

Bart Simpson?

Myron Falwell on July 16, 2013 at 8:35 AM

One of the funniest “Rick Roll” ever…

right2bright on July 16, 2013 at 10:00 AM

Perhaps the TV station should hire that famous law firm, “Boye, Dewey, Cheatem and Howe.”

Fred 2 on July 16, 2013 at 10:21 AM

Somehing similar happened to me at work. I was told to return a call to Mara Maines. Little did I realize the phone number supplied was to the Manhattan morgue. It was funny and I laughed. And then passed it on to the next sucker. Who, once she fell for it, immediately tired to turn me in for wasting time and money. Some people have no sense of humor.

Fred 2 on July 16, 2013 at 10:30 AM

Too many people bringing up lack of Glide Slope since ILS was down. Check out the approaches to that runway…the GPS approach also provides Glide Slope (very similar to ILS)…they were low on that GS as well.

SwabJockey on July 16, 2013 at 10:48 AM

Surely someone’s civil rights were lost. Where’s Holder?

aryeung on July 16, 2013 at 11:57 AM

Maybe they should have this handled by their public relations specialist, Wi Fuk Dup.

James on July 16, 2013 at 12:06 AM

And remedial journalism for their talking head, Mi Dum Hak.

Barnestormer on July 16, 2013 at 12:56 PM

If the plane was not in a stall, they were pretty close to it. By accounts I’ve read they were 40 knots below the target speed for landing, and way too low. Not having an ILS is no excuse. The weather was good, good visibility, and the runway does have a PAPI to aid pilots on a visual approach.

The plane probably was stalled. Recommended (or target) speeds for landing are intentionally only a few knots above maximum stall speed, so that when the plane is in its proper attitude a few feet above the runway, the pilot slows the plane into a stall, and it drops (gently) onto the runway. If the plane was 40 knots below the target speed, it was already stalled, and dropping fast. With the nose up too high, the tail hit the ground before the landing gear did, and with the rudder and stabilizers destroyed, the pilots lost control.

Since most landings are nearly upwind, pilots try to be just above stall speed near the start of the runway. If they experience a gust of headwind just before landing, this would give them additional airspeed and lift, resulting in a later touchdown, and a rollout (braking to a stop) further down the runway. Approaching at just above the stall speed gives pilots a margin of safety to enable the pilot to stall over the runway and land the plane even if struck by an unexpected headwind, without rolling beyond the end of the runway. In the event of a very strong headwind that lifts the plane too far above the runway, the pilot then increases throttle to abort the landing and circle around for another landing attempt.

Perhaps this pilot was No Not Hao?

Steve Z on July 17, 2013 at 12:28 PM