Green Room

House blocks enforcement of incandescent light bulb ban, again

posted at 3:27 pm on July 10, 2013 by

The light-bulb related ‘energy efficiency’ provision of the the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007, which essentially promotes more expensive compact fluorescent light bulbs, seems destined to never see the light of day:

Just like last year, Rep. Michael Burgess (R-Texas) proposed the language as an addition to the energy and water spending bill. His language prohibits the use of any funds at the Department of Energy to implement the standards.

Burgess said the federal government should not use regulations to impose standards that force consumers to buy the pricier bulbs, and said the market should be allowed to sort it out.

“If the new energy-efficient light bulbs save money, and if they’re better for the environment, we should trust our constituents to make the choice on their own move toward these bulbs,” he said. “Let the market decide.”

The government was authorized to impose standards for bulbs under the 2007 Energy Independence and Security Act, although Congress has delayed implementation of the standards for several years.

It’s still regrettable, however, that businesses as well as consumers are stuck in this perpetual state of uncertainty; and as I mentioned a few months ago, the decision to pass the original legislation was an exceptionally poor one, as is all top-down central planning that attempts to dictate consumer behavior and direct innovation based on nothing more than political preferences.

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LEDs will win anyway. CFLs are out.

FOWG1 on July 10, 2013 at 3:43 PM

I bought a case of 100 watt Newcandescent bulbs. Boy, are they long-lasting!

vityas on July 10, 2013 at 4:03 PM

LEDs will win anyway. CFLs are out.

FOWG1 on July 10, 2013 at 3:43 PM

Right on Brother!! I bought a whole bunch of R30 LED lamps for the various fixtures in my home and they are saving me a ton of money!! The up-front cost was painful (~26 R30 incandescent to replace) but I love the LEDs. Light quality is great, they work on any available dimmer and NO mercury to worry about.

Not for everyone for sure, but if you can replace an incandescent with LED, you won’t be disappointed…

powerpickle on July 10, 2013 at 4:14 PM

It’s still regrettable, however, that businesses as well as consumers are stuck in this perpetual state of uncertainty

Hey’ let’s toss out some ambiguous wafflin language to give the econazi’s something to hang onto. Or just to give General Electric a bit more wiggle room to open some more poisonous mercury vapor twisty light factories in China.

papertiger on July 10, 2013 at 4:28 PM

The heat given off by incandescent bulbs is sometimes a feature, not a bug. Like in particularly cold winters when the fluorescent bulbs in my garage won’t turn on because it’s too cold — don’t have that problem with the old-fashioned bulbs. My grandmother used to use a regular bulb (I think just 60 watts) to keep her food storage room from dipping below freezing.

acasilaco on July 10, 2013 at 4:48 PM

The heat given off by incandescent bulbs is sometimes a feature, not a bug. Like in particularly cold winters when the fluorescent bulbs in my garage won’t turn on because it’s too cold — don’t have that problem with the old-fashioned bulbs. My grandmother used to use a regular bulb (I think just 60 watts) to keep her food storage room from dipping below freezing.

acasilaco on July 10, 2013 at 4:48 PM

When incandescents in traffic lights in some cold-weather places were replaced with LEDs, they weren’t hot enough to melt accumulated ice and snow, so the lights couldn’t be seen. Now they have to install heaters to keep the lights clear. The law of unintended consequences.

merlich on July 10, 2013 at 5:00 PM

Just package regular light bulbs as “novelty heat bulbs.” This is what some folks in Germany did when the enviro-schmucks banned the bulb there and they are making a fortune. AND, it’s totally legal.

Rixon on July 10, 2013 at 5:36 PM

I did a survey of my household, and bought a 10 year supply of incandescent bulbs in various sizes and shapes.

It turned out that buying these bulbs by the case saved a significant amount of money, too…in addition to the savings from avoiding the hugely over-priced, poisonous, and poor quality CFL’s.

The only negative was that all of my light bulb money went to China…but this was due to the stupidity of our own government: not my fault.

One of the huge problems created by government light bulb tinkerers is that they completely ignore the problem of light fixtures. Most chandeliers WILL NOT accommodate alternative bulbs, and throwing the chandeliers away just to satisfy a government whim is stupid, wasteful, and just plain WRONG. In addition, LED substitutes require special handling for the way they dissipate heat: through the BACK of the fixture rather than through the FRONT of the bulb. Failure to take LED heat dissipation into account can easily result in a house fire…especially if you put the LED into an older can-style fixture in a ceiling.

Government light bulb tinkering is almost as wasteful (environmentally and life-cycle cost) as the ethanol mandate, with the added “benefit” that you can burn your house to the ground to show the world that you’re a committed eco-wacko!! (or an eco-wacko who SHOULD be committed!)

landlines on July 10, 2013 at 6:09 PM

One of the huge problems created by government light bulb tinkerers is that they completely ignore the problem of light fixtures…

landlines on July 10, 2013 at 6:09 PM

And the bulbs that fit in those fixtures are not being phased out.

…you can burn your house to the ground to show the world that you’re a committed eco-wacko!! (or an eco-wacko who SHOULD be committed!)

landlines on July 10, 2013 at 6:09 PM

That’s the same kind of science that brought us global warming.

The same scare tactics that were used against CFL’s are now being used against LED’s.

The recall against the LED’s was voluntary to fight the ignorant scare mongering.

cozmo on July 10, 2013 at 9:50 PM

The heat given off by incandescent bulbs is sometimes a feature, not a bug. Like in particularly cold winters when the fluorescent bulbs in my garage won’t turn on because it’s too cold — don’t have that problem with the old-fashioned bulbs. My grandmother used to use a regular bulb (I think just 60 watts) to keep her food storage room from dipping below freezing.

acasilaco on July 10, 2013 at 4:48 PM

Correct!

Another use for the heat of incandescent bulbs is that they provide an excellent source of heat for small sick animals/birds who need the heat as they can’t generate enough internal heat while ill. Just a few weeks ago, I found a newly hatched dove (unfeathered)and its nest that had been blown out of our pine tree during the night. The light was invaluable to keep him warm.

Also, during one cold blast when the temp got to 20degrees below zero, I kept a 60 watt bulb going in my garage for my outdoor cats. While the water outside was frozen solid, their water bowl only had a light skim of ice. That one bulb heated the whole garage.

A small issue with some, I’m sure…..but for those of us that rescue animals, it’s a big deal. For us and our rescues.

avagreen on July 11, 2013 at 8:23 AM

Up north in NH I’ll keep the incandescent bulbs because they help heat the house in winter, while in FL, I’m switching to LED bulbs. The CFL bulbs (I bought a couple early on) are a disaster.

philw1776 on July 11, 2013 at 8:50 AM

acasilaco on July 10, 2013 at 4:48 PM

avagreen on July 11, 2013 at 8:23 AM

And that’s why, even after the ban, those bulbs can still be purchased…at farm supply stores.

cozmo on July 11, 2013 at 8:52 AM