Green Room

ElBaradei named as new Egyptian PM; Update: Or not?

posted at 1:46 pm on July 6, 2013 by

Not a surprise, really, since Mohamed ElBaradei has been the international face of the secular opposition to both the Mubarak regime and the Islamist Morsi government.  The interim government clearly wants to put a technocratic and competent face on their efforts:

Three days after a coup that overthrew the nation’s first democratically elected president, opposition leader Mohamed ElBaradei has been named interim prime minister, a spokesman for his party said Saturday.

The news came after state media reported that the Nobel Prize-winning diplomat was summoned to the presidential palace by Interim President Adly Mansour for talks.

ElBaradei inherits a divided country, where thousands of Egyptians returned Saturday to the streets to mourn their dead and decry the ouster of President Mohamed Morsy.

This might also help convince the Muslim Brotherhood to work with the interim government, but there were no signals so far that they will:

On Saturday, the Muslim Brotherhood’s political wing, the Freedom and Justice Party, rejected the call for national dialogue from the newly installed interim president, Adly Mansour.

“The party reiterated its stance that it does not recognize the military coup and that the legitimate president of Egypt is Mohamed Morsy,” said Hussein Ibrahim Amin, the secretary-general of the party, in a statement, according to state-run EgyNews.

Can the international connections of ElBaradei help convince Western nations to accept the coup as a transition to a more pluralistic democracy?  He’s probably the Egyptian with the best standing to make the case, and that will likely be his highest priority in the next few weeks — especially with Egypt in need of the foreign aid it already receives.

Update: Looks like the announcement may have been premature:

The Salafis are Islamists, aligned in principle with the Muslim Brotherhood, but they don’t have a “Salafi Party.” The AP may be thinking of al-Nour, or the Salafist bloc.  If they’re negotiating on the composition of the new government, that’s bad news for the Muslim Brotherhood.

Recently in the Green Room:

Blowback

Note from Hot Air management: This section is for comments from Hot Air's community of registered readers. Please don't assume that Hot Air management agrees with or otherwise endorses any particular comment just because we let it stand. A reminder: Anyone who fails to comply with our terms of use may lose their posting privilege.

Trackbacks/Pings

Trackback URL

Comments

Wonderful. ElBaradei hates America and provided cover at the UN for the Iranian nuclear weapons program for a decade.

blue13326 on July 6, 2013 at 3:18 PM

Wonderful. ElBaradei hates America and provided cover at the UN for the Iranian nuclear weapons program for a decade.

blue13326 on July 6, 2013 at 3:18 PM

That is Nobel Peace Prize winner ElBaradei. He has good company with that award.

simkeith on July 6, 2013 at 4:31 PM

Egypt is poised to go to hell on a rocket sled any day now.

BL@KBIRD on July 6, 2013 at 6:18 PM

Egypt is poised to go to hell on a rocket sled any day now.

BL@KBIRD on July 6, 2013 at 6:18 PM

That would be a step up from the conditions of the past 2 years, at least for the Copts.

Steve Eggleston on July 6, 2013 at 6:32 PM

He is not to be trusted.

thebrokenrattle on July 6, 2013 at 9:34 PM

Working with the more radical Salafists simply because they’re not the Muslim Brotherhood?

I’m really starting to miss the Cold War. Much simpler times.

rbj on July 7, 2013 at 11:01 AM

Putting ElBaradei in charge would be a massive mistake. Morsi only lost power because we didn’t adequately cow-tow to the Army and did not unleash an adequate rein of terror in the first few months of his term.

Whoever takes the reins now must suppress the Muslim Brotherhood and Salafists with maximum brutality, or the result will be a civil war that will make Syria look like a minor dustup or another Iran. The only acceptable solution is unfortunately a military dictatorship with a practical and relatively secular western outlook.

claudius on July 7, 2013 at 11:35 AM

we=he

claudius on July 7, 2013 at 11:36 AM