Green Room

The fed govt is here for you: Proper “turducken” procedure

posted at 12:40 pm on November 12, 2012 by

Whatever would we do without them?

The “turducken” is a deboned stuffed chicken inside a deboned stuffed duck inside a deboned stuffed turkey. The name is comprised of syllables from the words “turkey,” “duck,” and “chicken.” Usually the tip end of the turkey leg bones and the first two wing joints are left on the turkey so that after assembly, the finished product resembles a whole turkey. Alternatively, the finished turducken can be a completely boneless roll with stuffing layered between each bird.

Stuffings may include cornbread dressing, sausage stuffing, oyster dressing, alligator, crawfish and shrimp. To serve, the roasted turducken is sliced crosswise so that servings consist of all the layers.

The idea for this multilayered, deboned fowl came from Louisiana where thousands of them are commercially prepared yearly. Turduckens are prepared in other States as well, and consumers also debone poultry and assemble them in home kitchens. …

Safe Handling of Turducken Ingredients

  • When creating a turducken at home, bring the raw birds directly home from the store and refrigerate (40 °F or below) immediately-within 2 hours (1 hour when the temperature is above 90 °F).
  • Make sure the raw poultry is wrapped securely and place it on a plate or casserole dish to prevent cross-contamination, or raw juices getting onto ready-to-eat food.
  • Store the raw turkey, duck, and chicken no longer than 2 days before deboning, assembling and cooking.
  • If the turducken has been purchased through mail order, make sure it arrives frozen with a cold source in an insulated carton. Transfer it immediately to the freezer. If the turducken arrives warm, notify the company. Do not use the product.

Refer to the USDA’s website for the full history and recipe– I mean, safety instructions (h/t Charlie Spiering).

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The idea for this multilayered, deboned fowl came from Louisiana where thousands of them are commercially prepared yearly

Romans were doing similar things a long time ago.

rbj on November 12, 2012 at 12:49 PM

We’re lucky they still allow us to eat it.

changer1701 on November 12, 2012 at 12:50 PM

Not sure what to be outraged about here. They’re not outlawing turduckens…

spinach.chin on November 12, 2012 at 12:59 PM

Not sure what to be outraged about here. They’re not outlawing turduckens…

spinach.chin on November 12, 2012 at 12:59 PM

Yet.

Steve Eggleston on November 12, 2012 at 1:02 PM

Proper turd-ducking procedure? Helpful the next time I visit the primate exhibit at the zoo.

JimLennon on November 12, 2012 at 1:05 PM

Not sure what to be outraged about here. They’re not outlawing turduckens…

spinach.chin on November 12, 2012 at 12:59 PM

It’s the USDA. Why are they wasting tax dollars and man hours on Thanksgiving day recipes? A warning to keep the birds at appropriate temperatures and to avoid cross contamination would have sufficed.

hopeful on November 12, 2012 at 1:06 PM

YOU HAVE TO EAT IT TO FIND OUT WHAT’S IN IT!

Marcola on November 12, 2012 at 1:27 PM

Whew. I thought this was going to be another government toilet program from the Germans who brought us “Sitzpinkler.”

tbrosz on November 12, 2012 at 1:39 PM

But…how do I safely prepare my turduckendogizzataco?

The government is repressing me….I’m being repressed!

BobMbx on November 12, 2012 at 2:10 PM

We’re lucky they still allow us to eat it.

changer1701 on November 12, 2012 at 12:50 PM

We should be thanking them.

txhsmom on November 12, 2012 at 2:42 PM

First they came for the turducken…….

BallisticBob on November 12, 2012 at 10:10 PM