Green Room

The 2012 London Olympics: A Celebration of Terrorism’s Success

posted at 8:28 am on July 25, 2012 by

Those old enough to have seen this horror played out live and worldwide on Television will always remember the vivid image of a Ski-masked terrorist on the balcony as the horror played out, and Jim McKay, looking every bit the man who has been reporting without sleep for more than a day, making the vile announcement, “they are all gone.”

The Olympic committee did not feel the massacre of 11 Israeli athletes were important enough to cancel or even delay the Olympic games, after all, they were only Jews.

“Incredibly, they’re going on with it,” Jim Murray of the Los Angeles Times wrote at the time. “It’s almost like having a dance at Dachau.”

Eleven innocents died that day. And the terrorists won.

Sure Golda Meir sent out a hit squad and killed most of the murderers behind the attack. But it was followed up by a world-wide effort to legitimize the terrorist Arafat which directly lead to the Oslo Accords and the second intifada. They say that those who forget the past are doomed to repeat it. That is an apt description of the most of the governments of the western world, they have returned to appeasing terrorists as if nothing ever happened.

The mastermind of the Munich attack Abu Daoud, claims future Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas provided the funds to carry out the Black September attack.

Yes the same Mahmoud Abbas who is considered a “moderate” terrorist.

Daoud made that charge in his 1999 French language memoir, “Palestine: From Jerusalem to Munich,” and again in an interview a few years ago with Don Yaeger of Sports Illustrated magazine.

Abu Daoud said the dozens of Palestinian terrorists allowed to return to the Palestinian territories as a result of the Oslo process while he remained persona non grata to Israel and the United States angered him. Abu Mazen, Daoud complained, is now considered “respectable” even though he also was involved in the Munich attack.

In his book Abu Daoud states:

“After Oslo in 1993, Abu Mazen [Mahmoud Abbas] went to the White House Rose Garden for a photo op with Arafat, President Bill Clinton and Israel’s Yitzhak Rabin and Shimon Peres.

“Do you think that … would have been possible if the Israelis had known that Abu Mazen was the financier of our operation? I doubt it.”

When Abu Daoud died, Abbas has eulogized him, the mastermind of the massacre at the Munich Olympics “He is missed. He was one of the leading figures of Fatah and spent his life in resistance and sincere work as well as physical sacrifice for his people’s just causes,” said Abbas.

This year’s London Games represents the 40th anniversary of that repulsive massacre.

Throughout the world (except for the Arab Nations of course) there have been calls for a moment of silence to remember the slaughtered eleven athletes, but to no avail.

Ankie Spitzer whose husband was murdered by Palestinian terrorists during the 1972 Munich Olympics has been fighting to have a minute of silence at the London Games to remember the eleven murdered victims.

Mrs Spitzer told the BBC:

“Our message is not one of hatred or revenge.

It’s the opposite. We want the world to remember what happened there so that this will never happen again.” Olympic ideals

Speaking from her Israeli home she said we should all vow, “that we will not bend for terrorism and that we stand for the Olympic ideal of friendship, brotherhood and peace”.

Mrs. Spitzer is correct; the only way to make sure it never happens again is not to forget!

But the IOC and the British (whose rule over the Holy Land was filled with excusing the massacre of innocent Jews) would like nothing better than the world to forget.

Munich widow Ankie Spitzer began her camppaign campaign by launching an online protest, which has since garnered support from across political spectrums in several countries including Israel, Canada, the UK, Australia, the US, Belgium and Germany.

The organization and its president Jacques Rogge have been subject to intense criticism from across the international community for its continued refusal to honor the 11 Israel Olympians murdered at the 1972 Munich Games with a moment of silence to mark the 40th anniversary of the killings, in what has been presented as a “humanitarian” gesture.

Ankie wrote a letter to Olympic officials requesting and an official silence to mark the 40th anniversary of the Munich Massacres, which said in part:

“Silence is a fitting tribute for athletes who lost their lives on the Olympic stage. Silence contains no statements, assumptions or beliefs and requires no understanding of language to interpret.”

Rogge’s mailed response declared “within the Olympic family, the memory of the victims of the terrible massacre in Munich in 1972 will never fade away.

Mrs. Spitzer also reports that earlier this year when the two met in person, Rogge protested his inability to act saying his hands were tied by admission of 46 Arab and Muslim members to the IOC.

“No,” Spitzer said she responded, “my husband’s hands were tied, not yours.”

Of course that is not what they are saying publicly. Games organizers the London Olympic Organizing Committee and the International Olympic Committee say publicly that they are avoiding the games boing “politicized.” But the is the IOC is afraid to do what is right because their fear of upsetting anti-Semites in the Muslim world.

This 2012 Olympic Games could be a celebration of the success of terrorism.

  •  It is being held in a nation with a history of appeasing Muslim terror, from their complacency in the Hebron massacre, to refusing to allow Jews to escape Hitler’s final solution by emigrating to the holy land or to England itself, to its decades long support of Palestinian Terrorists.
  • The Olympics are run by an organization, which in 1972 when the massacre took place, the IOC refused to delay or cancel the games to recognize the murder of the eleven Israeli athletes. Forty years later, that same Olympic Committee has reconfirmed its message to the world. Jewish blood doesn’t matter –we will not do the right thing because we are afraid of upsetting anti-Semites in the Muslim world.
  • The man who funded the Munich Massacre, Mahmoud Abbas, who now runs the terrorist organization who sponsored it, permitted field the team to the same Olympic Games even though he still refuses to recognize the right of Israel to exist as a Jewish state.

When originally designed, the modern Olympic Games were supposed to exploit athleticism as a way to bring the world together. It has never lived up to that ideal. This year’s London Games will be further from the game’s original peaceful goal than ever before, it’s housed in a country with a long history of appeasing Muslim terrorists, participated in by terrorist supporting countries such as Iran and Syria, refuses to remember eleven of their own massacred by terrorists during the Olympic Games 40 years ago, a massacre whose funding was arraigned by a man fielding a team to the event. That’s not irony, that is an example of how sick this world has become.

Jeff Dunetz is the Editor/Publisher of the Blog, The Lid

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Comments

Excellent article. Someday, somewhere, sometime the non-jihadist world needs to stop pretending that these butchers are anything other than who and what they are. Perhaps the IOC’s refusal of even a minute of time will help advance that message.

UnrepentantCurmudgeon on July 25, 2012 at 10:51 AM

We can each have our own moment of silence. When the Olympics come on the television, reach over and turn it off.

cthulhu on July 25, 2012 at 11:24 AM

It’s right and proper to have a debate about how best to remember Munich and it’s victims …but this is just a rant peppered with Anglo-phobic nonsense and one eyed view of history.

lexhamfox on July 25, 2012 at 12:27 PM

I’m planning 19 days of silence by not watching a single second of this year’s Olympics. I’m sick of it already with the Olympic-slanted commercials all over the NBC networks which are kind of like an infestation. It’s too bad for those athletes who have sincerely and honestly trained for the games that they compete under such dishonest leadership. I’m incensed by the biased and bigoted decisions the IOC has been making, still claiming they support and are accomplishing the community and brotherhood spirit of the games–they’re doing anything but. And if their leadership along with other organizations like the UN and NATO are any indication of what global community would be like on this planet, then I say “No thanks” because they have no clue of what America, our Constitution and our way of life are all about. We have our imperfections most certainly, but they’re way fewer than the rest of the world’s.

stukinIL4now on July 25, 2012 at 12:44 PM

lexhamfox on July 25, 2012 at 12:27 PM

No debate is needed. Stating that “debate” is right and proper is one of those things that sounds judicious until you think for a quarter-second. Eleven athletes were killed by terrorists at an Olympic games. Unity in the athletic community would be best expressed by acknowledging that in the traditional way — with a moment of silence — in the Olympic venue.

Unless you actually suggest another method of commemoration here, you are merely throwing out red herrings. It is neither judicious nor appropriate to suggest a “debate” on this topic. There is no justification for that. Nothing can justify deciding not to commemorate the deaths of 11 fellow athletes.

And we all know that if the athletes were from any other nation on earth, there wouldn’t even be a decision to make. Of course this is about politics and prejudice.

J.E. Dyer on July 25, 2012 at 9:52 PM

Unity in the athletic community would be best expressed by acknowledging that in the traditional way — with a moment of silence — in the Olympic venue.

J.E. Dyer on July 25, 2012 at 9:52 PM

I aqree and that was done two days ago during the Olympic Truce ceremony.

lexhamfox on July 25, 2012 at 10:16 PM

It’s right and proper to have a debate about how best to remember Munich and it’s victims …but this is just a rant peppered with Anglo-phobic nonsense and one eyed view of history.

lexhamfox on July 25,
2012 at 12:27 PM

Agreed – can anyone remember if Mr Dunetz wrote a similar article in 1996 before the Atlanta Olympics?

callingallcomets on July 26, 2012 at 10:33 AM

I aqree and that was done two days ago during the Olympic Truce ceremony.

lexhamfox on July 25, 2012 at 10:16 PM

An unannounced commemoration at a meeting in the Olympic village at which about 100 people were present.

In 2010, there was a moment of silence at the opening ceremony for athlete Nodar Kumartashvili, who had died during a practice run just before the opening of the winter games.

In 1996, the IOC president called for a moment of silence at the closing ceremony for the victims (1 dead, several injured) of the Olympic park bombing in Atlanta.

There are other instances of official commemoration as part of the Games, including commemoration of the victims of 9/11.

Olympic officials reportedly commemorate the Israeli athletes during some of their non-public activities. But the Olympic movement has never commemorated the Israelis in a unified public gesture. There is no way to make this normal. It is singling the Israelis out.

J.E. Dyer on July 26, 2012 at 11:38 AM

Someday, somewhere, sometime the non-jihadist world needs to stop pretending that these butchers are anything other than who and what they are.
UnrepentantCurmudgeon on July 25, 2012 at 10:51 AM

They will, when the blade is at their throats.

squint on July 26, 2012 at 6:31 PM