Green Room

Fast and Furious: The Other Shoe Drops (update)

posted at 8:50 am on December 8, 2011 by

Remember early on when the controversial and failed ATF/DoJ operation “Fast and Furious” came to light where the ATF bought guns and allowed them to be smuggled into Mexico, there was conjecture this was to be used as a means to demand more gun control?

Bingo.

CBS has uncovered some emails where it become pretty clear what the ATF’s intent was during the operation:

On July 14, 2010 after ATF headquarters in Washington D.C. received an update on Fast and Furious, ATF Field Ops Assistant Director Mark Chait emailed Bill Newell, ATF’s Phoenix Special Agent in Charge of Fast and Furious:

“Bill – can you see if these guns were all purchased from the same (licensed gun dealer) and at one time. We are looking at anecdotal cases to support a demand letter on long gun multiple sales. Thanks.”

Followed by:

On Jan. 4, 2011, as ATF prepared a press conference to announce arrests in Fast and Furious, Newell saw it as “(A)nother time to address Multiple Sale on Long Guns issue.” And a day after the press conference, Chait emailed Newell: “Bill–well done yesterday… (I)n light of our request for Demand letter 3, this case could be a strong supporting factor if we can determine how many multiple sales of long guns occurred during the course of this case.”

But here’s the problem for the ATF – those multiple purchases demonstrated nothing but cooperation with them as requested by them. The gun dealers involved only did what they did at the request of the ATF and even then they were (as it turns out, properly) even concerned about that:

In April, 2010 a licensed gun dealer cooperating with ATF was increasingly concerned about selling so many guns. “We just want to make sure we are cooperating with ATF and that we are not viewed as selling to the bad guys,” writes the gun dealer to ATF Phoenix officials, “(W)e were hoping to put together something like a letter of understanding to alleviate concerns of some type of recourse against us down the road for selling these items.”

ATF’s group supervisor on Fast and Furious David Voth assures the gun dealer there’s nothing to worry about. “We (ATF) are continually monitoring these suspects using a variety of investigative techniques which I cannot go into detail.”

Two months later, the same gun dealer grew more agitated.

“I wanted to make sure that none of the firearms that were sold per our conversation with you and various ATF agents could or would ever end up south of the border or in the hands of the bad guys. I guess I am looking for a bit of reassurance that the guns are not getting south or in the wrong hands…I want to help ATF with its investigation but not at the risk of agents (sic) safety because I have some very close friends that are US Border Patrol agents in southern AZ as well as my concern for all the agents (sic) safety that protect our country.”

Obviously the gun dealer had more concern for the life of the agents than did the ATF. But this was all an apparent ploy to advance more sweeping gun control in the area:

Two earlier Demand Letters were initiated in 2000 and affected a relatively small number of gun shops. Demand Letter 3 was to be much more sweeping, affecting 8,500 firearms dealers in four southwest border states: Arizona, California, New Mexico and Texas. ATF chose those states because they “have a significant number of crime guns traced back to them from Mexico.” The reporting requirements were to apply if a gun dealer sells two or more long guns to a single person within five business days, and only if the guns are semi-automatic, greater than .22 caliber and can be fitted with a detachable magazine.

On April 25, 2011, ATF announced plans to implement Demand Letter 3. The National Shooting Sports Foundation is suing the ATF to stop the new rules. It calls the regulation an illegal attempt to enforce a law Congress never passed. ATF counters that it has reasonably targeted guns used most often to “commit violent crimes in Mexico, especially by drug gangs.”

It’s one thing to want to “reasonably target guns” used to commit crimes in Mexico legitimately, and another to use the results of cooperation with an ATF operation, not matter how ill begotten, as a basis for targeting gun sales:

Larry Keane, a spokesman for National Shooting Sports Foundation, a gun industry trade group, calls the discussion of Fast and Furious to argue for Demand Letter 3 “disappointing and ironic.” Keane says it’s “deeply troubling” if sales made by gun dealers “voluntarily cooperating with ATF’s flawed ‘Operation Fast & Furious’ were going to be used by some individuals within ATF to justify imposing a multiple sales reporting requirement for rifles.”

Just another version of government creating a problem and then rushing in to fix it with more government control. A sort of “create a crisis and then don’t let it go to waste” if you will. The dishonesty and cynicism is appalling. Rep. Darrell Issa, whose Congressional committed has been investigating this operation said very pointedly about this evidence:

“In light of the evidence, the Justice Department’s refusal to answer questions about the role Operation Fast and Furious was supposed to play in advancing new firearms regulations is simply unacceptable,” Rep. Issa told CBS News.

This sort of behavior is, as noted, unacceptable, but, unfortunately, more and more frequent. Government becomes less and less of a servant of the people and more and more their master. Operations like this remind one of the legal veneer authoritarian governments use to gradually oppress their people.

Eric Holder and all those who planned and executed this travesty should be given their walking papers. It would be a welcome change to see them actually held accountable for their unacceptable behavior.

Yeah, that’s going to happen. We’re talking government here.

UPDATE: The Committee on Oversight and Reform has launched a website to cover the Fast and Furious investigation.

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Update; good for them

cmsinaz on December 8, 2011 at 11:06 AM

It would be a welcome change to see them actually held accountable for their unacceptable behavior.

The whole purpose of bureaucracy is to deter accountability by spreading blame so vastly that the oversight entities lose their will to enforce the law before reaching the ones most culpable.

Just because our President speaks in passive voice and subjunctive mood doesn’t make him serious and reflective; it means he is living in passive fantasy-land while denying that reality exists.

Holder is too close to Obama for the Great One to throw him under the bus without O’bama getting spattered. I think Obama hopes to stonewall and hypothesize about this until Issa gets gagged by the RNC.

rwenger43 on December 8, 2011 at 11:26 AM

Earlier today Michelle Malkin pointed out that Eric Holder was NOT required to take the oath to tell the truth during his testimony, and no one seems to be able to get a straight answer from anyone as to why he was allowed to avoid having to take an oath promising to be truthful… why is no one raising a major stink about this? Will someone at Hot Air look into this please?

Ceolas on December 8, 2011 at 3:14 PM