Green Room

The Betrayal of Mystery

posted at 1:04 am on May 25, 2010 by

Note: the following includes spoilers about the finale of Lost.

If you enjoyed the finale of Lost, I’m not writing this to challenge your taste.  You have nothing to apologize for, or defend.  There’s nothing “wrong” with cherishing the fine acting and emotional resonance of its reunions and farewells.  For my part, I loved the early years of Lost, which I would happily have declared the greatest television drama of all time, in the moment when Jack’s season-ending “flashback” was shockingly revealed to be a flash-forward.  I absolutely hate what the show degenerated into.  I thought the plot of the finale was a stunning act of creative cowardice, which no amount of effort from the talented cast could redeem.  I offer these thoughts as a memorial to what I thought Lost was trying to be, and a critique from someone fascinated by the art of storytelling.

The most common defense of the finale, along with the formless mass of random events and dead-end plotlines the series became, is the assertion that only the characters truly mattered.  The plot was a bit of intellectual stage lighting, designed to illuminate them from various angles.  Personally, I think both plot and characters are essential components of drama.  Does anyone seriously think Lost would have been nearly as popular if it had followed the exact same characters, living humdrum lives in suburbia?

To excuse the empty “secrets” and arbitrary plot points of the show is tantamount to saying it only matters who the characters are, not what theydo. This is a profound contradiction of the philosophy expressed during the show.  Much was said about the importance of making choices.  The wizard Jacob explicitly states, in one of the last episodes, that his millennia-long existence has been shaped by his desire to give others a choice in determining their fates… but the characters, and the audience, are completely in the dark about the rules and consequences governing these choices.  Powerful forces, like the Smoke Monster, operate by utterly arbitrary rules, revealed very late in the game.  In other words, the choice being offered to our heroes is a blind choice… and how is that really a “choice” at all?

The audience was kept in the dark as much as the characters were.  This was coupled with annoying prods from living plot devices like Eloise Hawking, who were inexplicably certain about various arcane matters.  The central drama of the last season revolved around the Smoke Monster attempting to escape from the island… until he suddenly decides to destroy it instead.  What made him think he would be able to accomplish this?  What made anyone think his escape would destroy the world, beyond the assurances of completely mysterious characters who make no effort to explain what they mean?

There is little real dramatic tension in a contest with random rules and imaginary stakes.  The early seasons of Lost were gripping because we embarked on a voyage of discovery with the characters, exploring the dangerous mystery of the island by torchlight.  By the end, everyone was plodding back and forth across the bland expanse of that island, blind pawns in an ancient contest whose rules and outcomes they couldn’t begin to understand.  It might have passed for dreary existential humor in a bull session down at the college coffee shop: our only real choice in life is deciding whether we want to be white or black tokens in a game we’ll never actually play!  It’s a poor excuse for storytelling, though, and I find it melancholy to watch good characters fumble through a bad story.

I’ve got no problem with sorcerers, demons, and magic caves as elements of a heroic fantasy.  I do have a problem with a story that pretends to be something rational, only to drop such elements on the audience at the eleventh hour, to cover the embarrassing inability of the writers to finish what they started.  Not even the most satisfied viewer of the Lost finale can pretend the show began with an honest confession that its puzzles were random and insoluble.  A commitment was made to the fans, both implicitly through the scientific trappings of early episodes… and explicitly through interviews given by the producers… that it would all make sense in the end.

The show achieved its greatest popularity during the years when eager fans flooded chat rooms with theories about The Numbers, The Hatch, the island’s fertility issues, the “sickness”, the frozen donkey wheel, the “special” children, and countless other plot twists.  If the producers had stated none of these riddles would ever be solved, most would be completely forgotten, and some would simply be dismissed as sorcery, those chat rooms would have turned into ghost towns overnight.

It’s not merely a question of riddles left unanswered.  The show lied to its viewers, repeatedly.  Remember Juliet saying “it worked” after the atomic bomb went off, followed by the last season’s opening shot of a submerged island in what appeared to be an alternate timeline?  That wasn’t some sort of clever misdirection.  It was an outright lie.  The reason everyone immediately rewinds The Sixth Sense after seeing it for the first time is that it plays fair. It shows the audience certain things, with complete honesty, and the audience misinterprets what it’s seeing.  It’s the difference between pulling a quarter out of someone’s ear with sleight of hand, versus knocking them unconscious and stuffing a coin in their earlobe.  The kind of cheating indulged by the Lostwriters will cost them their feet, if they ever run afoul of the madwoman fromMisery.

What happened at the end of Lost is the betrayal of mystery.  Storytelling requires a commitment of trust between author and audience.  Lost squandered six years of that trust.  None of the plot elements from the first two-thirds of the story had anything to do with its resolution.  The end of the story came from out of left field, as if the Harry Potter series had ended with a cop shooting Voldemort dead.  Sorry about all the fuss and bother, Harry.  Guess that whole “Chosen One” thing was just a dead end.  You were still a great character, though!  Give our best to Ron and Hermione!

That final scene in the Church of the Non-Denominational Afterlife was touching, but it was almost a separate story from the ugly mess lurching to a halt between the endless commercial breaks.  Jack’s painful walk to his final resting place gave his character the dignity of a tragic, yet uplifting end.  It matters that the reasons he died, along with everyone from unborn children to Dharma scientists and unlucky French explorers, were pulled from the creative oven half-baked.  Too much of their collective story was left to our imaginations, and we aren’t the ones getting paid millions by ABC Television to write this stuff.

The parts I don’t mind scripting for myself are the wacky adventures of Hugo the White, as he teleports around the globe and tries to… subtly manipulate people into making the fateful journey to his mystic island.  “Dude, you should totally catch that flight to Sydney.  And, um… insist on an aisle seat, okay?”

Cross-posted at www.doczero.org.

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I’m glad you can write down your analysis of LOST already, Doc. I’m still unable to do so without profanity, since I’m too thoroughly disgusted with the writers’ abdication of their responsibility to try to resolve the plot coherently. They conned us.

OhioCoastie on May 25, 2010 at 3:07 AM

Storytelling requires a commitment of trust between author and audience. Lost squandered six years of that trust. None of the plot elements from the first two-thirds of the story had anything to do with its resolution.

Touché, Doctor Zero.

While I enjoyed seeing the characters develop over the course of the show, I was in it mostly for the story. I took it on faith that the intriguing mysteries would eventually be revealed. A betrayal of mystery indeed.

jix on May 25, 2010 at 4:47 AM

I knew this series, like Obama, would end up being a huge disappointment and never bought into the hype.

Disturb the Universe on May 25, 2010 at 7:48 AM

From what I’m reading, they must of either had some of the same writers as Battlestar, or took a page from their playbook. Nothing worse than building up that relationship between the audience and the story, only to toss it in the rubbish heap in the end.

Anna on May 25, 2010 at 9:16 AM

Did you honestly believe that there’d be a coherent explanation to the series after they writers wrote themselves out of a season long hole with an ice covered time shifting donkey wheel?

livefreerdie on May 25, 2010 at 9:30 AM

Amen, Doc. I was pretty angry at the end of this show. It was a cop out. And I pegged it to be a version of Purgatory in the first season. I hoped all along I was wrong because that would have been the easy way out for the writers. Instead of making the answers as complicated as the show, they copped out.

Mad Mad Monica on May 25, 2010 at 9:58 AM

Lost would never make it as a book. Like the Doc said, the plot relied too much on lies. That wouldn’t translate to a novel. The finale was just a two hour musical montage with strings and pretty images. It was the basest that TV can offer. Manipulation.

It is one thing to not lose your sense of wonder, and another thing altogether to abandon reason.

Inanemergencydial on May 25, 2010 at 10:46 AM

I’ve really shied away from quirky, off-beat series, since “Twin Peaks”, because the episodic nature of television seems to cause producers and writers to get so caught up in the buzz of being quriky that it becomes an end unto itself — more important that the actual plot continuity.

Once you go down that path, you end up with stories that tend to throw random oddities at the wall to see if they’ll stick, with no concern about how those oddities might actually stick together long-term, so that surprise Plot Point A eventually has some logical relationship with however many other surprise plot points that follow. It’s almost like the TV version of a Pyramid scheme, where you need more and more off-beat ideas or moments to feed the demand to maintain the show’s buzz, before the whole thing collapses on itself.

jon1979 on May 25, 2010 at 11:02 AM

I’ve never seen a down of it. In fact, I thought it was some kind of survival game show until a couple weeks ago. Oh well, I’m sure my cluelessness doesn’t surprise anyone but me. If only the plot had included the ‘Tampa 2′ defense or a scoreboard…but, Dr 0, seriously, “the Smoke Monster”?

Knott Buyinit on May 25, 2010 at 11:35 AM

the wacky adventures of Hugo the White, as he teleports around the globe

LOL

beachgirlusa on May 25, 2010 at 12:23 PM

Wow – the first post by Doctor Zero that I completely disagree with.

Does anyone seriously think Lost would have been nearly as popular if it had followed the exact same characters, living humdrum lives in suburbia?

Sorry Doc but that’s a ridiculous analogy – the whole point of the island vs surburbia was that they were challenged in ways that they would not have been in any other situation…it was not just the characters themselves, it was how they each responded differently to their (extremly non-humdrum) surroundings and to each other.

I’m quite happy with the island itself staying largely a mystery. We don’t need the mechanics explained, we don’t need to understand it all. In fact that was an important theme of the series, that we just need to take some things on faith.

CityFish on May 25, 2010 at 2:28 PM

And I pegged it to be a version of Purgatory in the first season.

Mad Mad Monica on May 25, 2010 at 9:58 AM

I got the impression from the finale that it was only the new timeline introduced in season 6 that was a version of purgatory, and that the stuff on the island was “real life”.

RINO in Name Only on May 25, 2010 at 4:39 PM

At one point in Lost they showed the cover of a book by Ambrose Bierce, An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge, so I assumed the whole series were but events in the minds of all the dying passengers, but then it got too strange, because the writers really had no idea of what they were doing. It was not science fiction, but badly mangled fantasy. And yet the first two seasons were so gripping.

I felt cheated.

Dhuka on May 25, 2010 at 5:30 PM

Makes me glad I never got into the series.

ZK on May 25, 2010 at 6:34 PM

TV show. Get over it.

greggriffith on May 25, 2010 at 6:58 PM

Totally on point Doc. Lost peaked in its early seasons. I loved the mystery, but it just got too weird.

SCGOPgirl on May 25, 2010 at 7:02 PM

JJ Abrams has a history of starting shows and they are riveting and awesome. Than he gets bored with them and lets them and they end terribly.

My favorite show ALIAS ended much the same way. Great first 3 years, than JJ Abrams got pulled into doing LOST, and really let the ALIAS show collapse. He tried to tidy it up, but left you empty, because he tried to romance it up.

portlandon on May 25, 2010 at 7:05 PM

I got the impression from the finale that it was only the new timeline introduced in season 6 that was a version of purgatory, and that the stuff on the island was “real life”.

RINO in Name Only on May 25, 2010 at 4:39 PM

It wasn’t just your impression, but many people, including a large segment of the show’s fan base, were left mistakenly thinking that the entire show was meant to have been a dream/vision/purgatory. This demonstrates how poorly the writers handled the sudden transition from the already-pointless alternate timeline to a shmaltz-filled version of Jacob’s Ladder. But the writers needed to waste 1/3rd of the season with the alternate timeline to conceal how little on-island plot they had left.

DKCZ on May 25, 2010 at 7:11 PM

thats why smart people watch 24

;]

blatantblue on May 25, 2010 at 7:16 PM

I certainly don’t want to challenge your taste, either, Doc. But I fear you simply failed to comprehend the story arc. The only legitimate item in your laundry list of complaints was the irritating frequency of the commercial breaks in the finale–which were ABC’s doing, not the creative team’s. It’s a shame, but in the end your loss.

Blacklake on May 25, 2010 at 7:17 PM

You said it Z, what a fraud.

Osis on May 25, 2010 at 7:23 PM

For the last six years, I’ve been one of those rabid fans of LOST…the guy people who haven’t seen the show despise when I start going on and on about it. Even during the seemingly never-ending hiatuses (hiati?) I was plogging along on varius LOST discussion sites…DarkUFO was a fav.

I agree with Doc, if this is what he’s saying, that we got so much Dharma mystery stuff the first half of the whole series. and by the finale, it didn’t really matter much. I would have loved to learn more about that.

I’ve also been one of the show’s biggest critics when it came to episodes that, to me, failed miserably. But all that being said, I did go into the finale as a pessimist. I was expecting to be disappointed. But alas, I am at peace with it, and loved it.

How can I say this? I didn’t simply have a tear in my eye at the last scene…I was flat-out bawling. To me, that means it did what it was supposed to do. Every LOST fan is going to come away from the end feeling something different. Some hated it, some were OK with it, and some loved it.

All in all tho, I am completely satisfied with the finale. Again, I would have loved some answers to various mysteries that were tossed aside, but an intelligent viewer can go with that. LOST has always been a “smart” show…picking at people’s minds and brains, and not simply going for the cheap emotional angle all the time. Not to say there weren’t emotional scenes…Charlie drowning, Sun and Jin the same, Juliet falling.

But the show made us think. And ponder and question and a plethora of discussion sites came about for us LOSTaholics. LOST wasn’t a show you just watch each week, discuss around the water cooler, and go on. It was a show that was deeply a part of our lives. Very few TV shows can do that. Damon and Carlton succeeded.

So yes…I am at peace with the finale. I think I can let go. No TV show is perfect…but LOST came damn close.

JetBoy on May 25, 2010 at 7:24 PM

This is without question the first time I’ve vehemently disagreed with a DocZero post at HA.

Lost was not a series meant to lead you around by the hand and give you answers to every question you had about every minute detail that was used as a plot device. It would take them 20 years to do justice to all of the intricacies of the island. But that wasn’t the point. The island was an entity of itself, and the mythology that surrounded it for centuries was a clear indication that humanity wasn’t capable of understanding its significance, much as one could argue that humanity is incapable of understanding our reason for existence-the answer is “above our pay grade”. That’s why the island had a history of people attempting to interfere/control/save it. It didn’t need saving. The PEOPLE WHO CAME THERE did. And I think it did a masterful job of addressing the quantum aspects of the time travel issues by showing that the “flash sideways” existence wasn’t in any particular chronological place, but instead completely without time. Indeed, much of string theory and other quantum mechanics deals with space time, and how once you get to that discussion time takes a completely different meaning than we are used to dealing with from a temporal standpoint.

In the end, your opinion isn’t any less right than mine is, but I think that Lost was never trying to detail the specifics of the mythology that it created, but more trying to use that mythology to tell a story (an incredible moving soul wrenching story) about imperfect people and how they deal with adversity and ultimate redemption.

Just as in Pulp Fiction, we never find out what is in the briefcase to know of its significance. I don’t need to know the details of the light plug or whatever to understand its place in the story.

Agree to disagree I guess Doc.

Tman on May 25, 2010 at 7:25 PM

God, I love being vindicated because I quit watching that crap after the first three episodes.

BigAlSouth on May 25, 2010 at 7:26 PM

… The more I read about lost the more I’m glad I never watched it.

Stuck on an island. With other people. Who have evil powers? There’s a smoke monster? Flash forward?

Seriously, for best show in the ‘verse I’d go with something simpler: Firefly. Want to know what it is? It’s a sci-fi western. No wizardy, no smoke monsters, no stuck on an island for five years. Done.

Rightwingguy on May 25, 2010 at 7:30 PM

Seriously, when your favorite T.V. show starts sharing names with Twilight characters, it’s time to let go.

Rightwingguy on May 25, 2010 at 7:32 PM

Yes, the denouement was disappointing, but it’s not like I haven’t been there before. I was a fan of Battlestar Galacticaand The X-Files.

My biggest criticism of the show otherwise was that the stories of the Oceanic 6 after their “rescue” and the group stuck in the 1970′s Dharma Project were more often than not crashing bores.

I did kinda like the sideways reality, though, and looked forward to its explanation. I’ve always been fascinated by alternate realities and how a life’s trajectory can pivot on something as simple as a glance to the left instead of the right at a given moment. Of course, later I would find out that the whole thing was merely a plot device and meaningless in itself. Oh well.

SukieTawdry on May 25, 2010 at 7:35 PM

We stopped watching after Season 2. Ho hum.

GrannyDee on May 25, 2010 at 7:36 PM

A commitment was made to the fans, both implicitly through the scientific trappings of early episodes… and explicitly through interviews given by the producers… that it would all make sense in the end.

Funny enough, that’s also a spot-on summary of BSG.

Niko on May 25, 2010 at 7:52 PM

Funny enough, that’s also a spot-on summary of BSG.

Niko on May 25, 2010 at 7:52 PM

Funny too…on all the big LOST forums, everyone was saying they hope LOST didn’t pull a BSG.

JetBoy on May 25, 2010 at 7:53 PM

I could think of other directions that LOST could have brilliantly gone, but regardless, this was one possible arc. Still have questions (wassup with Jin and the giant panda teddy bear tangent into China?) & mysteries wanting to be revealed. But just like real life, some things are never understood. But I do understand why the smoke monster took out Mr. Eko.

All in all, although I wished it ended somewhat different, I loved it and await the DVDs, especially the bonus materials.

AH_C on May 25, 2010 at 7:55 PM

JetBoy on May 25, 2010 at 7:53 PM

The last hope of mankind now rests on V.

Niko on May 25, 2010 at 7:56 PM

Yes, Firefly is fantastic. In fact, I’ve already recommended it to a co-worker for her lost withdrawal…

Lost was pretty good, too, though.

It doesn’t have to be either/or…

hrh40 on May 25, 2010 at 7:58 PM

Oh, and one reason Firefly is great is because of Serenity the wrap-up movie.

Now THAT final explanation is a humdinger!!!

Maybe you oughtta’ check that out Doctor Zero.

It’s only 13 episodes and 1 2-hour movie.

And it’s a three-day weekend coming up …

hrh40 on May 25, 2010 at 7:59 PM

I certainly don’t want to challenge your taste, either, Doc. But I fear you simply failed to comprehend the story arc.

“Failed to comprehend” and Doc do not belong in the same sentence.

Really? We hardcore Lost fans were not paying attention to the story arc? REALLY? It’s not about what the finale was (if you liked it, that is terrific), it was what it might have been. With three years notice, it is disappointing the mystery side of the show was not better served by the writers.

It’s not about learning what makes the Force tick (a mistake in The Phantom Menace), but for Star Wars to say the Force was irrelevant and fans should only care about the characters is Solomon suggesting we should split the child. The parts make the whole; in the end Lost emphasized one and gave the other part the shaft (though granted it was filled with bright shiny yellow light).

Graybark on May 25, 2010 at 8:21 PM

splink on May 25, 2010 at 8:15 PM

Yeah, the universe must be a moron for having created such a waste of particles and energy.

Niko on May 25, 2010 at 8:22 PM

I didn’t expect the narrative to make total sense…the writers make it up as they go along. And I always find the answer is never that satifying…the important thing is to enjoy the ride and be entertained.

Seriously who was in awe when you found out the smoke monster was created by jacob throwing his brother into the glowcave…or that Hurley is the final candidate. Most of the answers they did give were always “meh”.

The cliffhanger is always more interesting than the resolution.

Pablo Honey on May 25, 2010 at 8:25 PM

They lost me when there was supposedly a polar bear in a tropical forest. When was that? Episode 2 of Season 1? I only watched the end of the series show to see if my fears were well-founded. Yup.

Myno on May 25, 2010 at 8:31 PM

I didn’t like the finale but the scene with Vincent and Jack at the end was very touching.

Rose on May 25, 2010 at 8:32 PM

They did explain the polar bear in Season 3 I think.

Pablo Honey on May 25, 2010 at 8:33 PM

I loved the finale. I got enough of an explanation to satisfy me, although this may be because I never expected everything to be explained anyway.

As AP said in his post, it would have been impossible to cover all the convoluted twists and turns of the show. Instead the focus was on the characters and how their personal destinies were resolved.

I thought it was beautifully done and deeply touching, and would not have been improved by pseudo-scientific blather about quantum entanglement, wormholes, and the multiverse.

And I thought some of Doc’s questions were answered, by implication. For instance, we can assume that the fertility problems were caused by the island’s powerful magnetic field, and that this same field helped heal certain people.

The shots of the island underwater presumably looked ahead to the finale, when large parts of the island did drop into the water. I wouldn’t call it a cheat. Significant parts of the island were submerged forever at the climax.

I could criticize some things, but overall I enjoyed the ride and was happy with the way it turned out.

sauropod on May 25, 2010 at 8:47 PM

Two words that made “Lost” bearable for the few episodes I actually saw:
Hot Desmond.

Case Closed.

mjk on May 25, 2010 at 8:51 PM

I don’t understand how people think the alternate reality arc in this last season was a waste of time or pointless. It was about coming to grips with what the characters thought were their fatal flaws in their lives. Jack had a relationship with his father, was a father and took care of Claire. He needed to learn to ‘let go’ of the fact that he didn’t have this so he could ‘move on’ to ‘the light’(heaven). I thought it all came together nicely from season 1. Jacob brought them all to the island because they were flawed and accepting their flaws is what gave them peace in the end. I loved it.

sammypants on May 25, 2010 at 8:52 PM

This is so off the mark, and though I’m sick of trying to illuminate the blind, I guess I will once more. LOST is even more special for it though, and the ending even more meaningful for those who understood and appreciated it (hint: among other things, it was a message TO and ABOUT you, and you missed it entirely).

It reminds me of a lot of other things in life, like politics: the truth doesn’t matter. Facts don’t matter if they are not known and understood. I say this because the “answers” for most of your questions are right there, in front of you, and you missed that too.

The Numbers, The Hatch, the island’s fertility issues, the “sickness”, the frozen donkey wheel, the “special” children, and countless other plot twists

All pretty much solved, save the neatly bowed ribbon. I would say use your brain, but instead I will say latch on to the thinking previously done by others who have intensely examined the show — and found reasonably conclusive answers to most of what you think they didn’t address. Lostpedia is a good place to start.

I’ve got no problem with sorcerers, demons, and magic caves as elements of a heroic fantasy. I do have a problem with a story that pretends to be something rational

Here it is less about getting “answers” as opposed to not liking what was answered. They never claimed to be out to explain gravity/fill in the blank science or pseudo science theory. As they have proven, the actual answers are almost never as good as the question and the subsequent speculation. They can and often do ruin it.

The show lied to its viewers, repeatedly

False. Just because a character says something, does not make it canon. Also, just because the fanbase builds up a mystery for themselves, does not make it significant to the storytellers. But characters contradicted themselves often, including in the finale with Desmond telling Jack “none of this matters” and Jack responding “No, I understand the stakes, and it most definitely matters.” And though there was no explicit statement, in writing, on your television screen, that “Jack was right” — Christian Shephard made it very clear that it was all real, and it all mattered. The writers weren’t lying to you, they were just making you think, and still wonder what was going on, and what it all meant. That was answered.

Remember Juliet saying “it worked” after the atomic bomb went off, followed by the last season’s opening shot of a submerged island in what appeared to be an alternate timeline?

Oh looky, another thing that was answered for you, you just didn’t like it. Guess what? She was wrong (in the context we thought, of creating a new “timeline”) but right for her. She was about to die — she was leaving to the other side, with Sawyer (as explicitly referenced in their incredibly touching reunion, with the coffee line).

Jughead was ALWAYS part of the Incident. What Happened, Happened. This was in fact a rule hammered into us, that you can’t change the past. Faraday tried, and failed. But it was not clear at the time whether it worked, hence the Sideways (and mystery solved). The island underwater was in their collective Heaven Sideways, in which they imagined the island to be underwater, fittingly since the island was NOT a part of their Sideways (after) life.

Just as you remember Juliet at the end of Season 5, do you remember Season 5 as a whole? You know, the incoherent clusterfark that sacrificed everything that made the show great so numbskulls could ZOMG LEARN ABOUT TEH TIME TRAVEL AND THE FRENCH WOMAN AND THE MONSTER AND THE HISTORY OF TEH ISLAND AND THE DHARMA INITIATIVE… Yet those storylines/answers weren’t all that great, were they? Oh, and remember “Across the Sea” with the dopey light in the cave, the corny acting and story … you know, the MYTHOLOGICAL DUMP episode …that, if the entire show was like, WOULD HAVE SUCKED DONKEY WHEEL?!!!! Sorry to tell you, but that’s what answers look like.

It was always about the characters, within this mysterious environment. It did all matter, but ultimately because of how it was relevant to their journey.

You may not like it but that IS what Lost is, and always was. Because you and others do not recognize that is on you — not the writers. They told the story they wanted to tell, and it was beautiful.

jjraines on May 25, 2010 at 8:57 PM

We old farts got over the final episode of “The Prisoner.” You’ll get over this.

tbrosz on May 25, 2010 at 9:08 PM

… The more I read about lost the more I’m glad I never watched it.

Stuck on an island. With other people. Who have evil powers? There’s a smoke monster? Flash forward?

Seriously, for best show in the ‘verse I’d go with something simpler: Firefly. Want to know what it is? It’s a sci-fi western. No wizardy, no smoke monsters, no stuck on an island for five years. Done.

Rightwingguy on May 25, 2010 at 7:30 PM

+1

I really liked Lost but Firefly was something else.

RAB on May 25, 2010 at 9:11 PM

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