Green Room

Judicial Home Invasion

posted at 11:13 am on September 4, 2009 by

This story utterly nonplusses me; not that a judge would want to make a bigotted, anti-Christian decision — I expect that — but that she would have the reasonable belief that she’d be allowed to do so by the appellate courts in New Hampshire, or any other state. (Full disclosure: I am not now, nor have I ever been a Christian, a religious or observant Jew, or even a believer in God; nor am I a disbeliever.)

If this story in the Washington Times is at all accurate, a judge has just ruled that a little girl must be removed from homeschooling and sent to a government school — because the judge hoped that would cause her to lose her religious faith:

A New Hampshire court ordered a home-schooled Christian girl to attend a public school this week after a judge criticized the “rigidity” of her mother’s religious views and said the 10-year-old needed to consider other worldviews as she matures….

On Tuesday, the girl, Amanda Kurowski, started fifth grade at an elementary school in Meredith, N.H., under court order. Amanda’s “vigorous defense of her religious beliefs … suggests strongly that she has not had the opportunity to seriously consider any other point of view,” District Court Judge Lucinda V. Sadler said.

Perhaps the Times got some elements wrong; but unless reporter Julia Duin fabricated the tale out of thin cloth, which is possible but very improbable, there’s no way to spin this decision as other than appalling. None of the normal confounding factors appear to apply here; Judge Sadler herself ruled that the child was well-adjusted, academically ahead of her grade level, and not isolated from other children:

The course load, except for the Bible study, is similar to what public students get and the mother’s home schooling has “more than kept up with the academic requirements of the [local] school system,” the judge’s statement said. The child also takes supplemental public school classes in art, Spanish, theater and physical education and is involved in extracurricular sports such as gymnastics, horseback riding, softball and basketball.

I must assume that each of these extracurriculars involves interacting with other children and with adults who may not share Amanda’s and her mother’s religion and religiosity, giving Amanda plenty of opportunity to seriously consider other religious points of view. But even if she did not have such activities, what business is it of a judge to judge that element of their religion? Would Judge Sadler order a Moslem girl not to wear a veil, or a Hassidic boy not to wear the distinctive clothing, hat, and hairstyle of that sect of Judaism? Yet such religious uniforms not only have the effect of isolating believers from infidels or goyim, that is the whole idea.

If I understand this ruling, Judge Lucinda Sadler would have been perfectly happy with Amanda’s homeschooling if the religious instruction hadn’t “taken,” if Amanda rejected her mother’s Christianity and become a Moslem, Jew, or atheist. For that would prove that Amanda had “considered [another] point of view,” you see.

The First Amendment to the United States Constitution begins, “Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof.” This fundamental right has absolutely, “no bout adout it,” been incorporated to the states, meaning that state law cannot violate it anymore than can Congress.

Is this not a textbook example of a state judge prohibiting the free exercise not only of Mom’s religion, but of Amanda’s as well? Even ten year old children have that right, so long as the belief does not physically endanger them (rejecting urgent medical treatment, for example). Nothing of the sort is involved in this case. One would imagine that a judge in a state whose very motto is “Live free or die” would think a second time before ordering a child into the government schools precisely in order to diminish her religious faith.

And by the way, isn’t it an eye-blowing admission against liberal interest that one of the functions of the government school system, deliberate or incidental, is to damage the religious faith of its students? Were I an advocate of compulsory government educational propaganda (which you may infer from my phraseology I am not), I would be aghast that some dork of judge came right out and let the beans out of the bag.

Lest anyone mistake Judge Sadler’s motivation, she made it even more explicit, if that’s possible:

“[Mr. Kurowski] believes that exposure to other points of view will decrease Amanda’s rigid adherence to her mother’s religious beliefs and increase her ability to get along with others and to function in a world which requires some element of independent thinking and tolerance for different points of view,” Judge Sadler’s ruling said.

The ruling quoted Mrs. [Janice] McLaughlin [court appointed “guardian of the child’s legal interests“] as saying the child “appeared to reflect the mother’s rigidity on questions of faith.” The child would “be best served by exposure to different points of view at a time in her life when she must begin to critically evaluate multiple systems of belief and behavior,” it added.

How thoughtful of the court (a previous court) to pick a guardian of Amanda’s “interests” who is clearly in complete disagreement with her over those interests. Perhaps if I were in a coma, and some wacko relative was suing to pull the plug so he could collect the insurance, the court would appoint the president of the Hemlock Society to speak for me.

I cannot imagine a state appellate court allowing this ruling to stand; in fact, I suspect it will end up in the United States Court of Appeals for the First Circuit for a ruling on the First Amendment question. And I wonder… is it possible this case will come up in the First Circus shortly before the 2010 elections?

If so, Democrats across the country will be forced to take a stand on federal control of religion — to supplement federal control of banking, the auto industry, energy, and health care. (Republicans too; but it will be a lot harder for Democrats to avoid infuriating either the liberal nutroots or real Americans.) The Squeaker, the Majority Leader, the chairmen of the two Judiciary Committees, and even the Big B.O., Barack H. Obama himself, will have to opine for the record.

To maintain party discipline and solidarity against homeschooling (which liberals despise, as it interferes with “proper socialization” of children), Democrats will have to tell American parents that their children’s religion will henceforth be controlled by the federal government — and convince them that this is for their own good.

What could possibly go wrong?

Cross-posted on Big Lizards

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Comments

This is absolutely appalling. As you have pointed out, this ruling is completely unconstitutional. If this family hasn’t already contacted Jay Sekulow and the ACLJ, they need to.

The ACLU probably wouldn’t want to get its hands “dirty” defending Christians, but how would they feel if this was done to an athiest’s child, on the claim that the child should be exposed to religious points of view?

theotherone on September 4, 2009 at 11:40 AM

Will homeschooled moslem and jewish children be required to “evaluate multiple systems of belief and behavior”? Doesn’t the court, in fairness, need to review the religious beliefs of ALL homeschooled children to make sure they are not too “rigid” in their faith?

DamnCat on September 4, 2009 at 11:56 AM

Appalling, yes but mildly misleading, this decision was made as part of a SAPCR–i.e. custody battle. It’s not like the woman and child were brought in on some kind of anti-homeschooling law; the lady’s disgruntled ex sought to force the kid to attend public school and the judge agreed. The real lesson here–don’t get divorced b/c (in addition to many other good reasons) it gives the state a huge amount of additional power over you and your kids.

exlibris on September 4, 2009 at 8:07 PM