Asked Wednesday whether or not she had seen any evidence of collusion between the Trump campaign and Russia, Senator Dianne Feinstein said she hadn’t.

“I know that you and some of your colleagues from the Senate Intelligence Committee drove over to Langley, Virginia yesterday to CIA headquarters and you were briefed,” CNN host Wolf Blitzer said. He continued, “You don’t have to provide us with any classified information, Senator, but do you believe, do you have evidence that there was in fact collusion between Trump associates and Russia during the campaign?”

“Not at this time,” Feinstein replied. Here’s a video of the exchange clipped by the Free Beacon:

It’s possible Feinstein knows something that she’s not prepared to share yet, i.e. maybe the proof is classified and she can’t talk about it. Still, it’s worth noting that Democrats have been suggesting for months now that an investigation will reveal evidence of collusion between the Trump campaign and Russia but for all that talk, so far there is no proof. Here’s a brief chronology:

March 3 – Sen. Coons says he believes the FBI has transcripts (which he hasn’t seen) which could provide evidence of collusion.

March 6 – Sen. Coons clarifies “I don’t have and I don’t know of any conclusive proof one way or the other.” He adds, “I have no hard evidence of collusion.”

March 9 – Buzzfeed reports Democrats on the Intel committee are worried the “collusion” probe isn’t going to pay off. “I don’t think the conclusions are going to meet people’s expectations,” one unnamed source tells Buzzfeed.

March 22 – Speaking of collusion, Rep. Adam Schiff tells MSNBC’s Chuck Todd, “There is more than circumstantial evidence now.”

April 2 –  Asked by CNN’s Jake Tapper if there is “definitive evidence” of collusion, Rep. Adam Schiff says, “I don’t think we can say anything definitively at this point.”

Add Sen. Feinstein’s comments yesterday to that list and you have two months of Democrats hinting but not offering any proof. And that’s just the elected politicians. Progressive media people like MSNBC’s Rachel Maddow have been much less restrained. From the Intercept:

The Intercept conducted a quantitative study of all 28 TRMS episodes in the six-week period between February 20 and March 31. Russia-focused segments accounted for 53 percent of these broadcasts.

That figure is conservative, excluding segments where Russia was discussed, but was not the overarching topic.

Here’s what that sounds like: