Thursday two PACs supporting Donald Trump filed a federal lawsuit seeking to halt the recount in Wisconsin. From the Associated Press:

The Wisconsin lawsuit and motion for a temporary restraining order was filed late Thursday in U.S. District Court in Madison by the Great America PAC, the Stop Hillary PAC and a Wisconsin voter, Ronald R. Johnson. The legal filings contend that the recount is unconstitutional because it doesn’t satisfy equal protection requirements under the law and may not get done by the Dec. 13 federal deadline to certify the vote, putting Wisconsin’s electoral votes in jeopardy.

No court hearings had been scheduled as of Friday morning. The Wisconsin Department of Justice was reviewing the lawsuit, said Johnny Koremenos, spokesman for Attorney General Brad Schimel…

There is a “realistic risk” the recount may not be done in time of the deadline and the “chaotic rushing necessary” to meet the deadline “creates an imminent unreasonable risk of error that can lead to votes being erroneously counted, disregarded, or diluted,” the motion for a temporary restraining order in Wisconsin contends.

The recount in Wisconsin began Thursday. This morning, in response to the lawsuit, a Twitter account associated with the Wisconsin Elections Commission (but lacking a check mark) tweeted this message:

So far, one county has completed the recount:

Trump won the state by about 22,000 votes. Stein’s reported reason for requesting the recount was concern about possible hacking of voting machines. Since the effort was launched, Stein has had a splash page on her site which says in part:

To give you a sense of the problem, some voting machines used in Wisconsin were banned in California after they were shown to be highly vulnerable to hacking and malicious programming due to lacking security features.

And last weekend Stein posted a video promoting the recount effort on Facebook in which she said, “Wisconsin uses voting machines that have been outlawed. They are illegal to use them because they are so prone to tampering and hacking. They are an invitation, really, for malfeasance. Those are used in the state of Wisconsin.”

That claim is false and Politifact has rated it “Pants on Fire” since the touch-screen machines Stein is talking about are legal in Wisconsin. More importantly, as her own website indicates, only about 10% of Wisconsin uses touch-screen voting machines. Those machines are not connected to the internet, meaning they would need to be individually tampered with to change the vote.

This is a rushed recount based on a conspiracy theory, driven by bitter disappointment and a self-aggrandizing candidate who got 1% of the vote in the state.