Sunday reflection: Luke 4:1–13

posted at 11:31 am on February 14, 2016 by Ed Morrissey

“Sunday Reflection” is a regular feature, looking at the specific readings used in today’s Mass in Catholic parishes around the world. The reflection represents only my own point of view, intended to help prepare myself for the Lord’s day and perhaps spark a meaningful discussion. Previous Sunday Reflections from the main page can be found here.  For previous Green Room entries, click here.

This morning’s Gospel reading is Luke 4:1–13:

Filled with the Holy Spirit, Jesus returned from the Jordan and was led by the Spirit into the desert for forty days, to be tempted by the devil. He ate nothing during those days, and when they were over he was hungry. The devil said to him, “If you are the Son of God, command this stone to become bread.” Jesus answered him, “It is written, One does not live on bread alone.”

Then he took him up and showed him all the kingdoms of the world in a single instant. The devil said to him, “I shall give to you all this power and glory; for it has been handed over to me, and I may give it to whomever I wish. All this will be yours, if you worship me.” Jesus said to him in reply, “It is written: You shall worship the Lord, your God, and him alone shall you serve.”

Then he led him to Jerusalem, made him stand on the parapet of the temple, and said to him, “If you are the Son of God, throw yourself down from here, for it is written: He will command his angels concerning you, to guard you, and: With their hands they will support you, lest you dash your foot against a stone.” Jesus said to him in reply, “It also says, You shall not put the Lord, your God, to the test.” When the devil had finished every temptation, he departed from him for a time.

Earlier this week, a good friend asked me a question about Ash Wednesday that momentarily took me aback. She asked in total good faith about the readings that day and their potential conflict with the practice of having ashes placed in a cross on our foreheads. The reading came from Matthew 6, in Jesus’ instruction to remain humble in faith and joyful in practice, and the question has been on my heart ever since.

“Take care not to perform righteous deeds in order that people may see them,” Jesus instructs the disciples. “When you give alms, do not blow a trumpet before you, as the hypocrites do in the synagogues and in the streets to win the praise of others. … When you pray, do not be like the hypocrites, who love to stand and pray in the synagogues and on street corners so that others may see them.” Those who do that have already “received their reward” in the moment rather than in eternity, because that was their purpose all along — to impress others, rather than serve the Lord. Even when fasting, Jesus instructs His disciples to look festive in order to leave the sacrifice between themselves and God. “Your Father who sees what is hidden will repay you,” He promises.

If that is so, do not our ashen crosses proclaim our piety? Actually, they proclaim exactly the opposite — the ash proclaims our sinfulness, and our mourning of it.

Lent is a season of mourning our sin in preparation for Holy Week and the celebration of the Passion. The ashes come from the burnt fronds from the previous year’s Palm Sunday, the recognition of the celebration the Lord’s people provided Jesus on His entry into Jerusalem. In that instance, the people embraced Jesus but soon rejected Him when He did not meet their preconception of a Messiah. They did not want to be freed from sin, but rather made a mighty nation in worldly power.

So do we also when we embrace sin. We do not order our lives and form ourselves to salvation, but worldly power and pleasure. Unlike the people of Jerusalem, we know of the Lord’s salvation and can grasp its nature, but too often all of us cast the palm fronds to the ground and turn our back on the Lord.

The ashes, far from being a symbol of piety, actually symbolize our own individual and personal betrayal. The symbol of our welcoming of Jesus gets destroyed into ashes, and then placed on our forehead to remind us of our rejection of Him for sin. It is also a day of fasting, of penance, and reflection for the same reason. We mourn our sin so that we may recognize it and reject it more fully in the future.

Sin exerts a powerful force on us, and that temptation comes from our nature, whether one wants to call it “original sin” or not. The conclusion that “the doctrine of original sin is the only empirically verifiable doctrine of the Christian faith” is generally credited to Reinhold Niebuhr, and our long history emphatically underscores its existence. This is, however, why the scene that unfolds in today’s Gospel is so remarkable.

Jesus goes to the desert, isolated from others and apparently also from the Lord, who allows the devil to tempt Jesus. The three temptations of Satan encompass all of the sins of men: avarice, power, and immortality — or equality with God. Despite Jesus’ state of distress, He rejects sin three times by referring back to the Lord’s commands to the Israelites in Deuteronomy. Rather than scheme to have His fill of food, Jesus reminds Satan in Deut 8:3 of God’s promise that “man does not live on bread alone,” and that He will provide for those who love and obey Him. When tempted by worldly power, Jesus responds by committing Himself to serving God (Deut 6:13). And when Satan demands that Jesus cast Himself onto the stones to prove His divinity, Jesus rebukes him with Deut 6:16 — “You shall not put the Lord your God to the test.”

These temptations answer and redeem the previous great sins of men. Adam and Eve ate the fruit of the tree when tempted to make themselves equal to God. The Israelites repeatedly tested the Lord, including at Massah, when they nearly put Moses to death before God allowed Moses to bring water forth. Similarly, when Israelites revolted for lack of sustenance, the Lord brought forth manna in the desert to remind them to be faithful.

Jesus came to us with a fully human nature to reject sin and to lead the way to salvation. He urged all of humanity to repent of sin and break out of their selfish natures to embrace all as children of God. That propensity toward sin isolates us from each other and distances us from God just as surely as the singular act of disobedience in the Garden of Eden did. The only remedy for that is recognition of our sinful nature, mourning it, and repenting of our rejection of the Lord. The ashes do not recognize our piety, but our understanding of the distance we have from it, and Lent gives us a season to form ourselves toward salvation in order to live eternally in the fullness of joy with our Father.

The front-page image is “The Temptation of Christ on the Mountain,” by Duccio di Buoninsegna, circa 1308-1311.


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Comments

…thanks Ed!

JugEarsButtHurt on February 14, 2016 at 11:46 AM

I’m glad your friend asked that question because I always notice it and wonder myself on ash wednesday!

Thank you for your response to that question. And it really is the truth – I wept that morning at mass; we are all such a mess and in great need of His mercy.

Magnolia on February 14, 2016 at 11:50 AM

Bravo as usual Edward. “Man does not live on bread alone” has always been one of the simplest, yet relevant, qoutes in history, IMO.

Indiana Jim on February 14, 2016 at 12:50 PM

Jesus being hungry at the end of a 40 day fast means that the fast has become life threatening. This isn’t some minor test; Jesus is really being taken to the mat.

What’s the point? Why is Jesus being put through this? We get two hints in Hebrews.

For because he himself has suffered when tempted, he is able to help those who are being tempted. – Hebrews 2:18

For we do not have a high priest who is unable to sympathize with our weaknesses, but one who in every respect has been tempted as we are, yet without sin. – Hebrews 4:15

It’s striking that Jesus needed this kind of disciplining. He is without sin, not to mention infinitely smart and wise. Yet this training adds something. This could even be part of the purpose of incarnation – since he obviously couldn’t do this without it.

Remember that the next time you’re stuck in something really harsh. Even Jesus needed trials.

Pythagoras on February 14, 2016 at 1:25 PM

A great and thoughtful read. thank you, Ed.

dogsoldier on February 14, 2016 at 1:26 PM

It’s all Jesus, :) His life, His obedience, His sacrifice, once and for all.

NHElle on February 14, 2016 at 1:27 PM

The ashes do not recognize our piety, but our understanding of the distance we have from it, and Lent gives us a season to form ourselves toward salvation in order to live eternally in the fullness of joy with our Father.

True enough but I know plenty of “good Catholics” who almost view the mark as a badge of piety. They went to mass, why didn’t you?

I also find it curious that the leader of the Roman Catholic faith is taking this time of lent to politicize the migration of illegal aliens into the United States. Worst Pope since Pius XII who made deals with the Nazis and let the Jews of Europe die while Catholics remained silent.

Happy Nomad on February 14, 2016 at 7:34 PM

It’s all Jesus, :) His life, His obedience, His sacrifice, once and for all.

NHElle on February 14, 2016 at 1:27 PM

Yes. The message of Christ is far more than outward marks of piety. Far more than the dictates of the Roman Catholic Church.

I have many gripes against the Roman Catholic Church. Especially on a day when the news includes the fact that a child molester priest in Minnesota that gets reinstated to the priesthood once he gets back to his native India. But my biggest condemnation of Catholicism is the idea that you can’t really be a Christian if you don’t obey the dictates of their socialist Pope and the bureaucracy of the Vatican.

Happy Nomad on February 14, 2016 at 7:53 PM

A mark of piety? Only if the only people one comes into contact with are other believers. When I was an altar boy I always viewed it as a mortification of the primary drive of the flesh – to look good to and to be accepted by one’s fellow man – loving the praise of man more than the praise of God.

In today’s society, if you wear ashes on your forehead on Ash Wednesday, you’re not seen as pious but as ridiculous. I have respect for those Catholics who do so.

Cleombrotus on February 14, 2016 at 8:40 PM

Jesus being hungry at the end of a 40 day fast means that the fast has become life threatening. This isn’t some minor test; Jesus is really being taken to the mat.

What’s the point? Why is Jesus being put through this? We get two hints in Hebrews.

For because he himself has suffered when tempted, he is able to help those who are being tempted. – Hebrews 2:18

For we do not have a high priest who is unable to sympathize with our weaknesses, but one who in every respect has been tempted as we are, yet without sin. – Hebrews 4:15

It’s striking that Jesus needed this kind of disciplining. He is without sin, not to mention infinitely smart and wise. Yet this training adds something. This could even be part of the purpose of incarnation – since he obviously couldn’t do this without it.

Remember that the next time you’re stuck in something really harsh. Even Jesus needed trials.

Pythagoras on February 14, 2016 at 1:25 PM

Good points.

AesopFan on February 14, 2016 at 11:41 PM

True enough but I know plenty of “good Catholics” who almost view the mark as a badge of piety. They went to mass, why didn’t you?

Happy Nomad on February 14, 2016 at 7:34 PM

Well, that is your chance then to remind those Church goers not to be so boastful, since Ash Wednesday starts the Lenten season of inner reflection, atonement, sacrifice and of making a spirited effort to remove that Sin our lives that keeps us from God, and prevents one from living a truly Christian life.

I also find it curious that the leader of the Roman Catholic faith is taking this time of lent to politicize the migration of illegal aliens into the United States. Worst Pope since Pius XII who made deals with the Nazis and let the Jews of Europe die while Catholics remained silent.

I guarantee you the Pope’s boss is not political……but it really doesn’t help that you choose to spread anti-Catholic lies about Pius XII when a quick look on the inter-webs proves your claims to be propaganda and false.

FlaMurph on February 15, 2016 at 12:30 AM

Happy Nomad on February 14, 2016 at 7:53 PM

.
You really needn’t worry about someone else’s Faith, as we Sinners are all supposed to work out our own Salvation for ourselves.
With a healthy dose of forgiving trespasses………..of course.

FlaMurph on February 15, 2016 at 12:34 AM

I always found it challenging to wear the ashes all day instead of wiping them off right after Mass. It made me feel so self-conscious – and not in a “notice me, I’m so pious” way.

Beautiful piece as usual, Ed. I never made the connection before between the meaning of last year’s palms being converted to this season’s ashes. I’ll always think of that now.

Happy Nomad, it’s not papal dictates and Vatican bureaucracy we Catholics obey – it’s the law of God and His Son Jesus, unchanging for two thousand years. The centuries have seen some clarified/deepened definitions of aspects of that law and doctrine, but nothing has been added that was not there from the beginning. Among other things, the Pope is not “infallible” except when speaking “ex cathedra” – officially presenting a teaching in his capacity as universal shepherd of the Church a doctrine on a matter of faith or morals – and such pronouncements have actually been very rare. So I’m free to disagree with Pope Francis, as I do, about humanly-caused climate change, while still agreeing with him that it’s important to be good stewards of the planet.

Ed, you mentioned Niebuhr as author of the notion that original sin was the only verifiable Christian doctrine, but actually G.K. Chesterton beat him to it by several decades:

Certain new theologians dispute original sin, which is the only part of Christian theology which can really be proved. Some followers of the Reverend R.J.Campbell, in their almost too fastidious spirituality, admit divine sinlessness, which they cannot see even in their dreams. But they essentially deny human sin, which they can see in the street. – Orthodoxy, 1908

If anyone here hasn’t read Orthodoxy – do! It’s short, wonderfully readable and quotable, and so wise. My favorite book. And it’s in the public domain, free online: http://www.ccel.org/ccel/chesterton/orthodoxy.html

Some of my favorite passages:

Joan of Arc was not stuck at the cross-roads, either by rejecting all the paths like Tolstoy, or by accepting them all like Nietzsche. She chose a path, and went down it like a thunderbolt. Yet Joan, when I came to think of her, had in her all that was true either in Tolstoy or Nietzsche, all that was even tolerable in either of them … Tolstoy only praised the peasant; she was the peasant. Nietzsche only praised the warrior; she was the warrior. She beat them both at their own antagonistic ideals; she was more gentle than the one, more violent than the other. Yet she was a perfectly practical person who did something, while they are wild speculators who do nothing. It was impossible that the thought should not cross my mind that she and her faith had perhaps some secret of moral unity and utility that has been lost.

It is obvious that tradition is only democracy extended through time … Tradition means giving votes to the most obscure of all classes, our ancestors. It is the democracy of the dead. Tradition refuses to submit to the small and arrogant oligarchy of those who merely happen to be walking about … Democracy tells us not to neglect a good man’s opinion, even if he is our groom; tradition asks us not to neglect a good man’s opinion, even if he is our father.

So one elephant having a trunk was odd; but all elephants having trunks looked like a plot.

Because children have abounding vitality, because they are in spirit fierce and free, therefore they want things repeated and unchanged. They always say, “Do it again”; and the grown-up person does it again until he is nearly dead. For grown-up people are not strong enough to exult in monotony. But perhaps God is strong enough to exult in monotony. It is possible that God says every morning, “Do it again” to the sun; and every evening, “Do it again” to the moon. It may not be automatic necessity that makes all daisies alike; it may be that God makes every daisy separately, but has never got tired of making them. It may be that He has the eternal appetite of infancy; for we have sinned and grown old, and our Father is younger than we.

For our Titanic purposes of faith and revolution, what we need is not the cold acceptance of the world as a compromise, but some way in which we can heartily hate and heartily love it. We do not want joy and anger to neutralize each other and produce a surly contentment; we want a fiercer delight and a fiercer discontent. We have to feel the universe at once as an ogre’s castle, to be stormed, and yet as our own cottage, to which we can return at evening. No one doubts that an ordinary man can get on with this world: but we demand not strength enough to get on with it, but strength enough to get it on. Can he hate it enough to change it, and yet love it enough to think it worth changing?

Christianity is the only religion on earth that has felt that omnipotence made God incomplete. Christianity alone has felt that God, to be wholly God, must have been a rebel as well as a king … When the world shook and the sun was wiped out of heaven, it was not at the crucifixion, but at the cry from the cross: the cry which confessed that God was forsaken of God. And now let the revolutionists choose a creed from all the creeds and a god from all the gods of the world, carefully weighing all the gods of inevitable recurrence and of unalterable power. They will not find another god who has himself been in revolt. Nay, (the matter grows too difficult for human speech), but let the atheists themselves choose a god. They will find only one divinity who ever uttered their isolation; only one religion in which God seemed for an instant to be an atheist.

Catholic doctrine and discipline may be walls; but they are the walls of a playground. Christianity is the only frame which has preserved the pleasure of Paganism.

Christianity, so far from belonging to the Dark Ages, was the one path across the Dark Ages that was not dark. It was a shining bridge connecting two shining civilizations. If any one says that the faith arose in ignorance and savagery the answer is simple: it didn’t. It arose in the Mediterranean civilization in the full summer of the Roman Empire. The world was swarming with sceptics, and pantheism was as plain as the sun, when Constantine nailed the cross to the mast. It is perfectly true that afterwards the ship sank; but it is far more extraordinary that the ship came up again: repainted and glittering, with the cross still at the top. This is the amazing thing the religion did: it turned a sunken ship into a submarine. The ark lived under the load of waters; after being buried under the debris of dynasties and clans,
we arose and remembered Rome … In a word, the most absurd thing that could be said of the Church is the thing we have all heard said of it. How can we say that the Church wishes to bring us back into the Dark Ages? The Church was the only thing that ever brought us out of them.

Theosophists for instance will preach an obviously attractive idea like re-incarnation; but if we wait for its logical results, they are spiritual superciliousness and the cruelty of caste. For if a man is a beggar by his own pre-natal sins, people will tend to despise the beggar. But Christianity preaches an obviously unattractive idea, such as original sin; but when we wait for its results, they are pathos and brotherhood, and a thunder of laughter and pity; for only with original sin we can at once pity the beggar and distrust the king.

Man is more himself, man is more manlike, when joy is the fundamental thing in him, and grief the superficial. Melancholy should be an innocent interlude, a tender and fugitive frame of mind; praise should be the permanent pulsation of the soul. Pessimism is at best an emotional half-holiday; joy is the uproarious labour by which all things live … Christianity satisfies suddenly and perfectly man’s ancestral instinct for being the right way up; satisfies it supremely in this; that by its creed joy becomes something gigantic and sadness something special and small. The vault above us is not deaf because the universe is an idiot; the silence is not the heartless silence of an endless and aimless world. Rather the silence around us is a small and pitiful stillness like the prompt stillness in a sick-room. We are perhaps permitted tragedy as a sort of merciful comedy: because the frantic energy of divine things would knock us down like a drunken farce … So we sit perhaps in a starry chamber of silence, while the laughter of the heavens is too loud for us to hear.

Joy, which was the small publicity of the pagan, is the gigantic secret of the Christian. And as I close this chaotic volume I open again the strange small book from which all Christianity came; and I am again haunted by a kind of confirmation. The tremendous figure which fills the Gospels towers in this respect, as in every other, above all the thinkers who ever thought themselves tall. His pathos was natural, almost casual. The Stoics, ancient and modern, were proud of concealing their tears. He never concealed His tears; He showed them plainly on His open face at any daily sight, such as the far sight of His native city. Yet He concealed something … I say it with reverence; there was in that shattering personality a thread that must be called shyness. There was something that He hid from all men when He went up a mountain to pray. There was something that He covered constantly by abrupt silence or impetuous isolation. There was some one thing that was too great for God to show us when He walked upon our earth; and I have sometimes fancied that it was His mirth.

Rosmerta on February 15, 2016 at 1:25 AM

Just to show my ignorance of things of a religious nature, I though ashes on the forehead was linked to the significance of ashes that were saved from the burning of a red heffer.

I am an idiot.

Thanks Ed for this weekly education.

HonestLib on February 15, 2016 at 7:51 AM

Rosmerta on February 15, 2016 at 1:25 AM

The world, especially the Western world, could use a few good G. K. Chesterton’s these days.

Cleombrotus on February 15, 2016 at 8:01 AM

I just want to say good bye to all my friends here.

Tomorrow Hot Air will only have a Facebook comment section. I am not on Facebook and, even if I was, I am not putting my last name on the internet with my comments.

I want to thank you, Ed, for your wonderful reflections each week. I will continue to read them. Probably won’t be reading the comment sections anymore on any Hot Air articles. It won’t be the same. Not the forum for deep discussions and open to too many people who don’t take these discussions seriously. Whether we have agreed or disagreed, we all know we take these things seriously and are sincere.

I have grown to have love in my heart for you guys, whether we agree or disagree. My dear brothers and sisters in Christ and devoted seekers who aren’t sure about God and all those who love the one true God.

You will all remain in my prayers.

God bless you all and your families always.

Love,
Elisa

Elisa on February 15, 2016 at 10:01 AM

Elisa on February 15, 2016 at 10:01 AM

This^^

Soooo many here that I will miss greatly, despite strong differences of opinion. I have learned much, and have been ever more strongly confirmed in my faith by my interactions here.

To all who have sought to explore, expound, expand, & explain in these Sunday sessions, my prayers are with you and your family, that Yahweh, the Father of Yeshua ha Mashiach and all who are called by His Name, will bless you and keep you.

questionmark on February 15, 2016 at 10:12 AM

May the you Lord bless you and keep;
and make His Face to shine upon you;
and give you peace.

IDontCair on February 15, 2016 at 10:53 AM

Elisa on February 15, 2016 at 10:01 AM

.
Ditto.
.
God Bless You Elisa and everyone here for all the Contributions to keeping Christ at the center of our lives. It think it has been an excellent learning experience, for everyone. I will definitely miss the deeper level thinking from all you guys.
Will definitely continue to read Ed’s incisive commentary, and hope all here still do so.

Always,

And be not conformed to this world; but be reformed in the newness of your mind, that you may prove what is the good, and the acceptable, and the perfect will of God.

FlaMurph on February 15, 2016 at 11:28 AM

Thanks, Elisa, questionmark, IDontCair, FlaMurph, and all the rest here. Blessings on all Hot Air-ians!

Rosmerta on February 15, 2016 at 1:08 PM

Cleombrotus on February 15, 2016 at 8:01 AM

Thanks, Cleo. Got a little long-winded there, but it was a labor of love to go through the text quickly and find all my favorites for you. :-)

Rosmerta on February 15, 2016 at 1:12 PM

But my biggest condemnation of Catholicism is the idea that you can’t really be a Christian if you don’t obey the dictates of their socialist Pope and the bureaucracy of the Vatican.

Happy Nomad on February 14, 2016 at 7:53 PM

“Socialism” is what Jesus calls all of us to do. But He doesn’t want us to use the government as an instrument of that socialism, He wants us to do it outselves — privately. In the moment we defer to government to enforce our socialism is the moment in which we allow those in government to steal from both us and others.

Indeed, when Jesus separates the sheep from the goats, He’s already told us in Scripture what we are to do.

By the way, that Scripture was kept whole by the instrumentality of the Pope and that Vatican. There is no person alone who could have done that, which is why the Holy Spirit used legions of people gathered in community. If you do not understand a unified community assuring with the guidance of the Spirit that every word of Scripture, and every possible act of assuring that, from age to age, a people dedicated to keeping and spreading that Word arise… Well, it’s going to happen and keep happening whether you understand or not.

unclesmrgol on February 15, 2016 at 1:16 PM

True enough but I know plenty of “good Catholics” who almost view the mark as a badge of piety. They went to mass, why didn’t you?

Happy Nomad on February 14, 2016 at 7:34 PM

Well, why didn’t you? Here begins yet another liturgical season of reflectance (as they all are in some fashion or another), and why didn’t you have enough respect for the Lord to go there and be in community with your fellow believers?

We are told over and over in Scripture to worship both in community and alone, but on some days our Church demands that we gather in community. Since the Church is moved by the Holy Spirit to require this worldwide, we are remiss if we don’t.

Since I work at a hard job, the ashes are usually gone within an hour or so. I’ve never ever had another Catholic tell me that I should have gone to Mass, and I’ve never done the same to any other who does not have ashes. It’s not like we are supposed to shellac them into place…

As in the case of Saul, you misunderstand, and therefore you persecute. May your eyes be opened sooner rather than later.

unclesmrgol on February 15, 2016 at 1:26 PM

Dear Ed,
Each week I came here to read your thoughts on the scripture readings from your church service.
I trusted you as a Christian…but today I found out you are mocking and dissing the very people, as imperfect and more that we all are, who made this site a top 10 site for YOU…simply because they don’t want to move to FB.
I am so disappointed.
Rachel

NHElle on February 15, 2016 at 7:38 PM

NHElle on February 15, 2016 at 7:38 PM

I saw. Not Ed’s finest moment, but then we are all occasional sinners. Nothing he said there detracts from what he says here.

unclesmrgol on February 15, 2016 at 9:12 PM

I saw. Not Ed’s finest moment, but then we are all occasional sinners. Nothing he said there detracts from what he says here.

unclesmrgol on February 15, 2016 at 9:12 PM

You have always been a good sort and will be missed.

HonestLib on February 16, 2016 at 9:34 AM

These threads should get a lot more interesting with FB commenting…

DarkCurrent on February 16, 2016 at 1:59 PM

Dear Ed,
Each week I came here to read your thoughts on the scripture readings from your church service.
I trusted you as a Christian…but today I found out you are mocking and dissing the very people,
NHElle on February 15, 2016 at 7:38 PM

I saw. Not Ed’s finest moment, but then we are all occasional sinners. Nothing he said there detracts from what he says here.
unclesmrgol on February 15, 2016 at 9:12 PM

We’re accusing people of doing something sinful??? Accusing them of being “untrustworthy” on a Christian level??? Seriously ?? Really ???
Are – you friggin kidding me ? Get a grip here
THIS IS LENT – that HAS to mean something. Maybe not in the petulant whiny Trumpertantrum side of HA- but definitely with Reflections……which it appears the reflection part of the lesson is getting lost along the way.
I’ve looked at the 6500+ comments on the FB change post and am disgusted at the mindset of these “supposed” diehard HA’ers who act as if this is the end of the world – and so feel justified in trashing decent hard working people- with their offensive small mindedness.
But I figured……NOTIN.HERE.
Not in SR. I’m not an FB user either- but If this is the right move or change for the HA group- and I have to trust in that- then allow them to do what THEY feel is needed – put your “feelings” aside and trust that HA will remain strong and viable in the cyberworld – and possibly grow even larger, reaching more people. Ed and Co.at least deserve that.

FlaMurph on February 16, 2016 at 2:17 PM

THIS IS LENT – that HAS to mean something. Maybe not in the petulant whiny Trumpertantrum side of HA-
FlaMurph on February 16, 2016 at 2:17 PM

HonestLib on February 16, 2016 at 3:59 PM

Ed, was going to leave you a comment on the TEMS thread but could not, so hope you don’t mind me making it here.

I very much appreciate this weekly reflection and I still remember the email you sent me with links discussing Original Sin. Man, have I learned a lot since then. I hope the road you are on is good for you in every way.

If you every need anything from my just drop me an email and I will help out in any way.

I really have enjoyed my time here and wish all the best.

May God bless you and your family with joy and inner peace.

HonestLib on February 16, 2016 at 4:11 PM

I am not on Facebook and, even if I was, I am not putting my last name on the internet with my comments.

I want to thank you, Ed, for your wonderful reflections each week. I will continue to read them. Probably won’t be reading the comment sections anymore on any Hot Air articles.
Love,
Elisa

This^^

questionmark on February 15, 2016 at 10:12 AM

Ditto.

FlaMurph on February 15, 2016 at 11:28 AM

Ditto, too!

I’m not getting involved with FB, either.

Blessings!

tiptopsaidhe on February 16, 2016 at 4:26 PM

Wish I could give you all a big hug.

Thank you, Ed, from the bottom of my heart.

Love to you all.

God bless us all here, our families and our country.

Elisa on February 16, 2016 at 5:54 PM