When is a dog worth more than a quarter million dollars?

posted at 12:41 pm on January 27, 2016 by Jazz Shaw

Out in Colorado we learned the answer to the question in the title of this post. A dog can be worth a lot of money if somebody shoots it for no good reason, and that includes police officers. (Yahoo News)

A Colorado dog owner received $262,000 in a settlement over a police shooting of his dog, one of the largest-ever settlements in this type of case.

Officer Robert Price of Commerce City, Colo., shot and killed a dog in 2012 during response to a report of a “loose, vicious dog” while the owner, Gary Branson, was out of town, Allison Sylte reported for USA Today. The officer was found not guilty of animal cruelty, but a neighbor filmed the encounter, and the resulting video showed the dog, Chloe, cowering before three officers.

The large, monetary settlement comes as society is demonstrating a decreased tolerance for offenses against animals – and police use of excessive force generally. Earlier in January, the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) began the collection of data on animal abuse, The Christian Science Monitor reported. The FBI points to research showing criminals who harm other humans egregiously often begin by hurting animals.

This case was outrageous when it first hit the news and it’s no less disgusting now. The cop involved in the shooting was charged with animal cruelty, but was acquitted. I have no idea why. There’s a video out there of the shooting (filmed by a neighbor) but I won’t even link to it here because it’s so disturbing. The dog in this case was not attacking the officer or anyone else and, in fact, was cowering in fear. I understand that some dogs are raised improperly and can be extremely aggressive or territorial. While that’s the owner’s fault and not the dog’s, there will still unfortunately be times when a dog has to be dispatched. That wasn’t the case here.

What’s more interesting is the size of the settlement and whether or not this signals an emerging trend around the nation. As the report points out, there are now 46 states where severe animal cruelty is punishable as a felony, marking a rather rapid change from the days when dogs and cats (as well as other animals) were simply considered property. I’ve never been one to advocate for animal “rights” because they don’t really have any in the same way that people do, but that’s no excuse for wanton cruelty and causing the needless suffering of a defenseless animal.

As a side note, when I was discussing this case with a couple of friends one of them remarked that I seem to have more sympathy for dogs than I do for criminal suspects and I come down harder on the cops in defense of an animal than some human beings. I can’t really argue with that one. I’ve never known an evil dog but there are plenty of evil people out there. There are far more cases of humans getting shot by cops where it’s totally justified.

Also from the article, there are some resources out there which might make unfortunate events such as this one less common.

To provide a similar resource to police, the National Canine Research Council published an hour-long training video. With help from the Department of Justice, the New York-based think tank produced videos to avoid, communicate with, or respond to dog encounters in the line of duty, according to its website.

“First and foremost, Police and Dog Encounters is about staying safe,” according to a news release. “It gives officers hands-on skills and information to protect themselves, the residents nearby, and the dogs they encounter in the line of duty.”

There’s some good stuff in there and I hope more police departments look into these types of training resources.

Bubble Wrap Dog


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katy the mean old lady on January 27, 2016 at 12:44 PM

Poor Beagle…

OmahaConservative on January 27, 2016 at 12:45 PM

Interesting note on this, a local radio station was talking about this yesterday. A woman called in, saying she had been in the courtroom during the case against the officer. While the report says the dog was “cowering,” she said that when they slowed down the image frame by frame, it looked like the dog was NOT cowering, but rather beginning to engage.

Not saying this was right or wrong, but just thought I’d point out that the news story isn’t necessarily 100% (per one secondhand witness).

RblDiver on January 27, 2016 at 12:46 PM

I know how cops will respond (in considering what’s happening with the Planned Parenthood case, seems more likely) – they’ll make it a crime to film the police.

Ukiah on January 27, 2016 at 12:49 PM

I’ve never known an evil dog but there are plenty of evil people out there.

There are definitely very evil people around … but this sentiment of yours about dogs is truly ridiculous. They’re friggin dogs. You know … NOT people.

ThePrimordialOrderedPair on January 27, 2016 at 12:51 PM

This case was outrageous when it first hit the news and it’s no less disgusting now. The cop involved in the shooting was charged with animal cruelty, but was acquitted. I have no idea why. There’s a video out there of the shooting (filmed by a neighbor) but I won’t even link to it here because it’s so disturbing. The dog in this case was not attacking the officer or anyone else and, in fact, was cowering in fear.

So the cop was acquitted, but did he get fired? Because he should’ve.

Bitter Clinger on January 27, 2016 at 12:52 PM

It’s a sad story, and I’m glad the owner is getting some justice. That poor dog deserved better.

However, we have live children being butchered and their parts sold, and the people who brought it to our attention have been indicted.

libfreesMom on January 27, 2016 at 12:53 PM

whatever happened to animal control using bite sticks and lassos?

dmacleo on January 27, 2016 at 12:53 PM

she said that when they slowed down the image frame by frame, it looked like the dog was NOT cowering, but rather beginning to engage.

Frame by frame images from video can be highly misleading. Most of us have seen a still image taken from a frame of video that makes a person look like they are grimacing in anger or rage and then when you see the whole video you discover they were only yawning or getting ready to sneeze.

tommyboy on January 27, 2016 at 12:55 PM

I think the mental distress caused by an unnecessary and cruel loss of the dog justifies that compensation.

MJBrutus on January 27, 2016 at 12:56 PM

Good. Yes, taxpayers get stuck with the bill in the end, but this killing was unacceptable, and the settlement sent a clear message.

Rusty Nail on January 27, 2016 at 12:57 PM

Anyone who kills an innocent dog has to do penance by killing 100 evil cats.

Yeah, and pay a quarter million bucks.

kcewa on January 27, 2016 at 12:59 PM

I personally know of a dog that, if it’s ‘cowering,’ one wrong move on your part and you get attacked.

Ricard on January 27, 2016 at 12:59 PM

whatever happened to animal control using bite sticks and lassos?

dmacleo on January 27, 2016 at 12:53 PM

Probably considered to dangerous and/or physically rigorous for our brave officers. You wouldn’t want them to not go home safe at night, would you? Or all tuckered out?

Leonidas Hoplite on January 27, 2016 at 1:02 PM

There are definitely very evil people around … but this sentiment of yours about dogs is truly ridiculous. They’re friggin dogs. You know … NOT people.

ThePrimordialOrderedPair on January 27, 2016 at 12:51 PM

The point is that when police engage with a person, there is a distinct possibility that person – especially having engaged with the police in the first place – could be acting out of malice and could, in fact, be “evil”.

Not the case with a dog. As Jazz points out, a dog could be corrupted by a bad owner, but they’re not going to consciously react out of malice because they’re
evil”.

That’s not a variable you need to account for with a dog.

deadrody on January 27, 2016 at 1:05 PM

I good time to repeat my favorite bumper sticker.

“THE MORE PEOPLE I MEET THE MORE I LIKE MY DOG”

Becomes more true with every passing day. People are annoying.

fogw on January 27, 2016 at 1:06 PM

bubble wrap??

That’s some animal neglect right there.

WryTrvllr on January 27, 2016 at 1:07 PM

whatever happened to animal control using bite sticks and lassos?

[dmacleo on January 27, 2016 at 12:53 PM]

Cops don’t call animal control when they go to shooting practice.

Dusty on January 27, 2016 at 1:08 PM

Note the incident last year when the cop showed up at a family dispute (wasn’t violent), and tried to shoot the family dog. Instead he killed the wife. Oh yeah, and he and his buddy prevented the husband, a trained combat life saver, from administering aid to her. Oddly enough, that “vicious” dog the cop was trying to shoot didn’t inflict any injuries on the cop….

quikstrike98 on January 27, 2016 at 1:08 PM

whatever happened to animal control using bite sticks and lassos?

dmacleo on January 27, 2016 at 12:53 PM

The dog was actually on a bite stick when it was shot and killed by the cop. It was in a garage, cornered by animal control and cops. Cop tazed it, it was then looped around the neck with a bite stick. Dog was then outside the garage kinda jumping around, pulling, trying to get free (as many dogs on these do) and the cop just walked up fairly calmly and shot and killed it. No where near biting anyone, and was definitely secured on the stick.

Jazz, come on, it wasn’t a beagle that was shot. Why post a pic of obviously the wrong dog?

nextgen_repub on January 27, 2016 at 1:08 PM

Prefer the company of dogs over most humans

Dogs are incredibly loyal and trustworthy

Some dogs will protect you to the end and beyond

(Still recall video of a dog defending his masters space as the man had collapsed on city sidewalk. Idiot cop
Shoots mans dog because was too dumb and uncaring to out think the dog) ps a shield or garbage can cover would have done the trick to ward off dog.

BigSven on January 27, 2016 at 1:12 PM

My only beef on this is the taxpayer is getting the bill instead of the guy who actually gunned down someone’s pet.

whatcat on January 27, 2016 at 1:12 PM

Good

celt on January 27, 2016 at 1:13 PM

whatever happened to animal control using bite sticks and lassos?

dmacleo on January 27, 2016 at 12:53 PM

Exactly. I don’t remember the police gunning down dogs, even if they were aggressive.

Ironic that the more we talk about “animal rights” and other such phony concepts, the more I seem to hear stories about cops shooting people’s dogs. Back when pets were considered to be “only property”, it seems that people had more respect for that “property.” Every story I hear about the cops raiding someone’s house, if they have a dog and it barks at them, it gets gunned down in front of the family, even kids. Is it the worst thing that’s going on? Nah, but it is a pretty obvious indicator of societal decline.

dkmonroe on January 27, 2016 at 1:13 PM

Question: did they ever go back to the person who reported “vicious dog on the loose” to see why they made a false report?

Animals are animals. They don’t have rights, but they humans do have a duty of care. There is something especially evil about anyone who wantonly kills, tortures, or maims an animal out of depraved indifference or because they are sadistic.

I hunt and fish, but like most everyone else I know who hunts and fishes we are responsible toward the game, much as ranchers are responsible toward their cattle, pigs, or sheep.

What I have seen is neighbors, who are just filled with hate for animals, going out of their way to make an animal a problem. Granted, there are plenty of owners who are irresponsible and fail to take care of their animals.

Still, how do we know this wasn’t deliberate. How do we know this wasn’t some Mrs. Kravitz-like busy-body upset Chloe was on escaped her back yard and decided to falsely report to the police an almost rabid dog was on the prowl?

If so, it wouldn’t be the first time a neighbor falsely reported a violent crime in progress to get the police to show up in full battle-rattle. I don’t think the story is complete until we know more about the catalyst and who started the chain of events.

TXGRunner on January 27, 2016 at 1:15 PM

Jazz, come on, it wasn’t a beagle that was shot. Why post a pic of obviously the wrong dog?

nextgen_repub on January 27, 2016 at 1:08 PM

What breed was it?

OmahaConservative on January 27, 2016 at 1:16 PM

This happens quite often. Apparently some cops really enjoy shooting dogs.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/news/puppycide/

quikstrike98 on January 27, 2016 at 1:17 PM

My only beef on this is the taxpayer is getting the bill instead of the guy who actually gunned down someone’s pet.

whatcat on January 27, 2016 at 1:12 PM

Agreed.

Athos on January 27, 2016 at 1:17 PM

In Colorado Claire Davis’ life was worth nothing.

Lee Jan on January 27, 2016 at 1:18 PM

As the report points out, there are now 46 states where severe animal cruelty is punishable as a felony,

I hope when those muslims are found having sex with goats, camels and sheep that the book is thrown at them.

Don’t let them off with the ‘It was consensual’ defense

txdoc on January 27, 2016 at 1:22 PM

Very sad

SpongePuppy on January 27, 2016 at 1:22 PM

In defense of the officer, he thought the dog was a liberal.

Tom Servo on January 27, 2016 at 1:26 PM

And yet millions of postal workers and delivery drivers are able to do there jobs with out shooting any dogs. I’m glad they are introducing some training videos on how to handle animals.

Shtetl G on January 27, 2016 at 1:27 PM

whatcat on January 27, 2016 at 1:12 PM

The community that pays the tax to pay the culprit cop needs to PAY. Then maybe the community
will demand the police, mayor, council to hire thinking responsible cops, give them training, and fire those
that fail in normal standards of decency toward animals.

The community should get the message to clean up their act

BigSven on January 27, 2016 at 1:28 PM

What breed was it?

OmahaConservative on January 27, 2016 at 1:16 PM

It was a pitbull mix of some kind, looked to weigh about 60 pounds best guess.

Question: did they ever go back to the person who reported “vicious dog on the loose” to see why they made a false report?

It was a pit bull mix walking around the neighborhood, no clue why the vicious part was added, but also don’t know what the dog did before cops showed up.

All, dog was on the leash pole when it was shot. That’s the worst part of it to me, dog was at that point feet away from being able to bite when shot.

nextgen_repub on January 27, 2016 at 1:31 PM

You’d think that with all these cops shooting dogs, they were a serious danger to cops.

No police officer has been killed by a dog in over a century.

A few have been killed by cows, however.

quikstrike98 on January 27, 2016 at 1:31 PM

The community that pays the tax to pay the culprit cop needs to PAY. Then maybe the community
will demand the police, mayor, council to hire thinking responsible cops, give them training, and fire those
that fail in normal standards of decency toward animals.

The community should get the message to clean up their act

BigSven on January 27, 2016 at 1:28 PM

Typical BS, that trial lawyers like to use..Send a message to that nasty corporation in NYC or LA or wherever by a huge settlement over a non-issue.

Sure he shouldn’t have shot the dog, but 1/4 million. Give me a break.

txdoc on January 27, 2016 at 1:31 PM

Good. Yes, taxpayers get stuck with the bill in the end, but this killing was unacceptable, and the settlement sent a clear message.

Rusty Nail on January 27, 2016 at 12:57 PM

Clear message to whom about what? The community pays the quarter million, although most of those on the hook are horrified by what happened. Did the police department have an unreasonable policy on using lethal force on dogs that permitted what the officer did?

Or was the bad act purely on the officer himself?

The dog owner’s loss was mostly not financial. The award was severely punitive. Those paying the award did nothing to deserve punishment.

How is it possible that the officer was acquitted of cruelty to animals when his act was video-taped? That’s the interesting question and perhaps makes sense of this strange story.

Immolate on January 27, 2016 at 1:32 PM

The jury did a good job on this one —– there is a growing problem among many police departments around this country with gun-happy police officers. There is absolutely no reason to shoot a dog under any circumstances, unless it happens to be rabid and in the process of chomping down on somebody’s body parts. The cop who did this should be hit, and hit hard. Personally I’m sick and tired of the growing militarization of police departments — cops in full riot gear look like a bunch of guys who flunked out of Army boot camp and have an overwhelming need to regain their egos.

E.Normus.Balzac on January 27, 2016 at 1:32 PM

The large, monetary settlement comes as society is demonstrating a decreased tolerance for … police use of excessive force generally.

That is just an outright lie by the LSM.

earlgrey on January 27, 2016 at 1:32 PM

Nah, but it is a pretty obvious indicator of societal decline.

[dkmonroe on January 27, 2016 at 1:13 PM]

Maybe. I don’t know. With the Internet now we get to hear about Every-single-last-one of these stories. We didn’t use to. We used to only hear about the close ones, the ones in our own communities and neighboring ones.

I’ve got the best police department in the whole world. I’d never worry about it happening here. I think the kind of attitude that presents itself in these cases comes from the top — the people who run the department. They green light this stuff with their hiring attitude, their mission statement attitude, their briefing attitude, their defense of their officers egregious conduct, the whole shebang. And if you have that kind of attitude, you are more likely to hire that kind of person and the next thing you know you have a whole department full of them and they are out shooting up the neighborhood.

Dusty on January 27, 2016 at 1:33 PM

A few have been killed by cows, however.

quikstrike98 on January 27, 2016 at 1:31 PM

That’s bull.

Immolate on January 27, 2016 at 1:34 PM

In Colorado Claire Davis’ life was worth nothing.

Lee Jan on January 27, 2016 at 1:18 PM

What’s your point?

earlgrey on January 27, 2016 at 1:38 PM

deadrody on January 27, 2016 at 1:05 PM

“evil” is a quality that is assessed apart from actions. When you confront somebody you don’t consider whether that person is evil or not; you consider whether that person is dangerous, and act accordingly.

To assign moral judgments, such as “evil” to animals is ridiculous. Yes, most of us use that term occasionally for emphasis when discussing such things but it isn’t serious. Animals are not “evil” or “good”. They are not moral creatures and they aren’t given to moral judgments. To think, seriously, that animals should be considered this way is to make a mockery of morality.

I have had dogs all my life and like them very much. But, in the end, they are just dogs. They aren’t people. They aren’t “evil” or “good”. And the idea that dogs are given to personalities but couldn’t possibly be “evil” unless corrupted by their owner … is really just the classic “noble savage” sort of thinking applied to lower animals.

Anthropomorphizing is fine and serves a purpose often but people have to be aware of its limits.

I don’t defend whatever might have happened in this case but that doesn’t mean that it makes sense to blow it all out of proportion and react as if this had been a human shot. And the judgment of a quarter million dollars is insane.

ThePrimordialOrderedPair on January 27, 2016 at 1:38 PM

txdoc on January 27, 2016 at 1:31 PM

It wasn’t YOUR dog was it pal?

That’s obvious

BigSven on January 27, 2016 at 1:38 PM

$262,000.00 for taxpayers to pay for the owner’s mental distress?

Whatever the facts were, that’s way too much.

fadetogray on January 27, 2016 at 1:41 PM

How is it possible that the officer was acquitted of cruelty to animals when his act was video-taped? That’s the interesting question and perhaps makes sense of this strange story.

[Immolate on January 27, 2016 at 1:32 PM]

I didn’t watch the vid, so I’d just note if he did it in one or two shots and did it rapidly, as a juror I’d acquit because it wasn’t “cruel”.

On the other hand, if they tried him for depraved indifference, or pox on society, or 3rd degree chickensh!t, I might vote guilty, as the cruelty was and is to the owner and puts the fear into all animal owners in the community.

Dusty on January 27, 2016 at 1:49 PM

Maybe. I don’t know. With the Internet now we get to hear about Every-single-last-one of these stories. We didn’t use to. We used to only hear about the close ones, the ones in our own communities and neighboring ones.
Dusty on January 27, 2016 at 1:33 PM

It’s that way with all news. The older folks here, like me, never knew of the crimes taking place across the globe because back in the day they just reported local news. Now I read about all kinds of crime happening in every backwater village of third world countries and think the world is going to Hell in a handbasket.

Dr. Frank Enstine on January 27, 2016 at 1:49 PM

The jury did a good job on this one —– there is a growing problem among many police departments around this country with gun-happy police officers. There is absolutely no reason to shoot a dog under any circumstances, unless it happens to be rabid and in the process of chomping down on somebody’s body parts. The cop who did this should be hit, and hit hard. Personally I’m sick and tired of the growing militarization of police departments — cops in full riot gear look like a bunch of guys who flunked out of Army boot camp and have an overwhelming need to regain their egos.

E.Normus.Balzac on January 27, 2016 at 1:32 PM

I disagree.

1) Dog menaces my child or my wife.
2) Dog attacks my livestock.
3) Dog attacks my pet when it is in a place it has a right to be, unprovoked.
4) Dog is running toward me aggressively.

When I was a kid coming up on the farm in Minnesota, a neighbor’s dog go loose and was chasing our sheep. My father shot it, then plowed it under where it fell. He returned the dog’s collar to the owner so he’d know where his dog was.

Now I love dogs, and I would gladly get bitten if it would enable me to avoid killing one. But that’s me. I would never ask another person to assume those risks, and I’d never accept those risks to another person.

Also, unless you have evidence that the problems you suggest were problems with the particular police force in question, then you’re assuming facts not in evidence.

Immolate on January 27, 2016 at 1:50 PM

A few have been killed by cows, however.
quikstrike98 on January 27, 2016 at 1:31 PM

Cops should refrain from running into cows with their patrol cars.

Another Drew on January 27, 2016 at 1:57 PM

There is just one condition I can think of where that kind of sum might be warranted – if that police department has casually killed pets before and the taxpayers had to pay out lesser amounts, and the behavior hasn’t changed.

In that case sending a message might make sense. Get the taxpayer’s attention.

fadetogray on January 27, 2016 at 1:58 PM

I have had dogs all my life and like them very much. But, in the end, they are just dogs. They aren’t people. They aren’t “evil” or “good”. And the idea that dogs are given to personalities but couldn’t possibly be “evil” unless corrupted by their owner … is really just the classic “noble savage” sort of thinking applied to lower animals.

ThePrimordialOrderedPair on January 27, 2016 at 1:38 PM

I’ve known some rotten dogs in my time.

Immolate on January 27, 2016 at 1:59 PM

So, the officer was acquitted for the shooting, but will he face departmental discipline for his actions bringing disrepute upon the department?
I suppose it all depends on what the City Manager and Council have to say to the Chief?

Another Drew on January 27, 2016 at 2:02 PM

A dog, after being approached by strangers in its territory, is tazed and dragged by its neck, and it tries to get away… what a vicious animal.

evergreen on January 27, 2016 at 2:19 PM

Buffalo police shot 92 dogs between Jan. 2011 and Sept 2014. That’s twice as many dogs as the NYPD shot. Nope, there’s no dysfunction with the entire Buffalo PD. None at all. Nothing to see here people, move along….

http://legacy.wgrz.com/story/news/local/buffalo/2014/11/14/buffalo-pd-dog-shootings/19012631/

quikstrike98 on January 27, 2016 at 2:19 PM

The settlement seems a bit excessive but… you do have a policeman who likes to shoot house pets under the control of an animal control officer(it was in a bite stick) when he gets nervous.

elgeneralisimo on January 27, 2016 at 2:20 PM

my prediction: If it already hasn’t happened, this officer will be involved in some excessive use of force cases. He clearly wants to shoot something/somebody. He should never have a gun again–he will kill someone and claim it was in self defense.
Just call animal control, dumb ass.

Doc Holliday on January 27, 2016 at 2:25 PM

The settlement seems a bit excessive but… you do have a policeman who likes to shoot house pets under the control of an animal control officer(it was in a bite stick) when he gets nervous.

elgeneralisimo on January 27, 2016 at 2:20 PM

It’s time that police get the message that we as a society won’t tolerate gratuitous cruelty to our family members (and most dog owners consider them a member of their family) just so Barney Fife can see what his nifty little gun can do to another living creature.

You’ve got cops shooting dogs who are safely enclosed in fences. Cops conducting raids ON THE WRONG HOUSE who calmly blow the dogs away the minute they walk in the door. Cops who are called due to a dog running loose and instead of waiting for Animal Control, just shoot the thing. Heck, there’s dash cam video of two cops in a patrol car responding to a loose dog, and one of the cops says “I’m just gonna shoot it. I hate dogs.” He’s still got a badge and gun, “Serving and protecting” a community near you.

quikstrike98 on January 27, 2016 at 2:26 PM

Why reward the owner for letting the dog run loose? It was owner’s negligence that led to shooting. Better that the settlement be paid to shelters, animal health charity, etc.

quraina on January 27, 2016 at 2:31 PM

As a side note, when I was discussing this case with a couple of friends one of them remarked that I seem to have more sympathy for dogs than I do for criminal suspects and I come down harder on the cops in defense of an animal than some human beings. I can’t really argue with that one. I’ve never known an evil dog but there are plenty of evil people out there.

Jazz this is a disturbing admission. A criminal is a human being, and from a Christian perspective, a bearer of God’s own image. It is on that basis that murder is condemned in the Hebrew scripture. Thus he is always deserving of a higher level of consideration, respect and sympathy than an animal. A man may be depraved (and all men are to some extent) and even evil – but he is still a man. When humans are valued as less than animals (or even some humans valued less than some animals) we are on the same path as the eugenicists and ethnic-cleansers.

theblackcommenter on January 27, 2016 at 2:32 PM

What are two women delivering newspapers is a cop sucker of a DA worth?

corona79 on January 27, 2016 at 2:32 PM

[Immolate on January 27, 2016 at 1:50 PM]

No surprise on the sheep chasing dog. The stress from what some call dog worrying when they are chased can cause sheep to die and pregnant ewes to miscarry their lambs. I’ve never been cautioned by my sister and B-I-L about my dog bothering their horses, cows or goats, but they sure warned me about my dog chasing their sheep.

Dusty on January 27, 2016 at 2:34 PM

The officer was found not guilty of animal cruelty, but a neighbor filmed the encounter, and the resulting video showed the dog, Chloe, cowering before three officers.

If you are a cop or other public official and you don’t not act like you are being caught on video every minute you are doing your job, you are stupid. Plain, pure and simple stupid, and you deserve everything you get.

Every single minute of every day when you are out in public is being caught on video of some sort.

Johnnyreb on January 27, 2016 at 2:39 PM

A few have been killed by cows, however.

quikstrike98 on January 27, 2016 at 1:31 PM

heh maybe they need 4 wheelers
excerpt from Vacation movie 2015 on my dropbox

dmacleo on January 27, 2016 at 2:46 PM

Personally I’m sick and tired of the growing militarization of police departments — cops in full riot gear look like a bunch of guys who flunked out of Army boot camp and have an overwhelming need to regain their egos.

E.Normus.Balzac on January 27, 2016 at 1:32 PM

About 15 years ago, a friend of my Dad’s resigned from his rural Missouri Sheriff’s Department, after around 25 years on the job. The reason for his resignation was the new guys coming on the job. They ran around with high and tights like they were Marines, wore combat boots, had a fetish for all the new “tacticool” crap. Conversation in the locker room was regarding the hilarity that could be had by screwing with people and making their lives miserable, for no real good reason. These guys wanted to run around like they were patrolling the streets of Fallujah, rather than serving and protecting the community, and building good relations with the people by whom they were employed. He saw the nature of policing changing fundamentally, and he wanted no part of it. The phenomenon of dog shootings is a symptom of this.

quikstrike98 on January 27, 2016 at 2:47 PM

Jazz this is a disturbing admission. A criminal is a human being, and from a Christian perspective, a bearer of God’s own image. It is on that basis that murder is condemned in the Hebrew scripture. Thus he is always deserving of a higher level of consideration, respect and sympathy than an animal. A man may be depraved (and all men are to some extent) and even evil – but he is still a man. When humans are valued as less than animals (or even some humans valued less than some animals) we are on the same path as the eugenicists and ethnic-cleansers.

theblackcommenter on January 27, 2016 at 2:32 PM

I think what he meant by his statement is that a scared dog lashing out is more sympathetic than a robbery suspect pulling a gun on a cop. One has a lot more understanding of the situation and is intelligent enough to know the outcome of their actions. While a cop should understand a cornered dog is scared and doesn’t need to be blown away just cause.

nextgen_repub on January 27, 2016 at 3:13 PM

fogw on January 27, 2016 at 1:06 PM

Or how about this one:
MY GOAL IN LIFE IS TO BECOME THE KIND OF PERSON MY DOG THINKS I AM

leftamark on January 27, 2016 at 3:24 PM

The jury did a good job on this one

E.Normus.Balzac on January 27, 2016 at 1:32 PM

(The jury acquitted the officer. The money came from the city settling out of court.)

RblDiver on January 27, 2016 at 3:39 PM

As a long time beagle owner I’m 99% sure this dog posed no threat to these 3 police officers. I guess anything is possible, but I’m not buying it.

Beagles, and hounds in general, are pretty docile toward people. They have a very loving disposition and live to please their owner.

Dick Richard on January 27, 2016 at 3:51 PM

…during response to a report of a “loose, vicious dog” while the owner, Gary Branson, was out of town…

Who was watching the dog? Wouldn’t they be liable? It’s truly horrible that the dog was shot but… the amount of the settlement is just stupid.

Fallon on January 27, 2016 at 3:55 PM

Dick Richard on January 27, 2016 at 3:51 PM

Apparently, the photo is not of the dead dog. From earlier…

It was a pit bull mix of some kind, looked to weigh about 60 pounds best guess.

Question: did they ever go back to the person who reported “vicious dog on the loose” to see why they made a false report?

It was a pit bull mix walking around the neighborhood, no clue why the vicious part was added, but also don’t know what the dog did before cops showed up.

All, dog was on the leash pole when it was shot. That’s the worst part of it to me, dog was at that point feet away from being able to bite when shot.

nextgen_repub on January 27, 2016 at 1:31 PM

Fallon on January 27, 2016 at 3:59 PM

When humans are valued as less than animals (or even some humans valued less than some animals) we are on the same path as the eugenicists and ethnic-cleansers.

theblackcommenter on January 27, 2016 at 2:32 PM

I agree. Fur babies? Pet parents? I think we’ve taken this animals as children thing way too far.

Fallon on January 27, 2016 at 4:03 PM

And, I am an animal lover. I’m just not an animal lover.

Fallon on January 27, 2016 at 4:04 PM

Speaking of that, Jazz….what’s the status of Willy? Did you find him a home or are you going to ship him to me?

Solaratov on January 27, 2016 at 4:04 PM

The community that pays the tax to pay the culprit cop needs to PAY. Then maybe the community
will demand the police, mayor, council to hire thinking responsible cops, give them training, and fire those
that fail in normal standards of decency toward animals.

The community should get the message to clean up their act

BigSven on January 27, 2016 at 1:28 PM

But “the community” didn’t kill the pet. My thinking is that if individuals know there are (costly) consequences for their actions, it not only impacts the individual in question, but also serves as a warning to others.

whatcat on January 27, 2016 at 4:09 PM

she said that when they slowed down the image frame by frame, it looked like the dog was NOT cowering, but rather beginning to engage.

RblDiver on January 27, 2016 at 12:46 PM

So was this RoboCop encountering the dog? I don’t know any non-cyborg human cops who are able to slow down real-time eyeball video and evaluate it frame-by-frame.

And here I was like a fool, thinking RoboCop was some fictional action flick, instead of a real life documentary!

s1im on January 27, 2016 at 4:51 PM

It wasn’t YOUR dog was it pal?

That’s obvious

BigSven on January 27, 2016 at 1:38 PM

No dog is worth a quarter million unless a show champion out for breeding.

Ludicrous award.

Probably got if for 50 bucks at the pound

txdoc on January 27, 2016 at 5:11 PM

Punitive damages are meant to send a message. Fining the city/department 50 bucks for gross misconduct on the part of the officer would be a joke.

quikstrike98 on January 27, 2016 at 5:15 PM

Poor pup

Jason58 on January 27, 2016 at 5:47 PM

When is a dog worth more than a quarter million dollars?

Never, not under any circumstances, it’s only a dog.

MrsGsBoyTommy on January 27, 2016 at 6:55 PM

Or how about this one:
MY GOAL IN LIFE IS TO BECOME THE KIND OF PERSON MY DOG THINKS I AM

leftamark on January 27, 2016 at 3:24 PM

A sugar daddy?

WryTrvllr on January 27, 2016 at 7:15 PM

Crap like this is why Black Lives Matter exists. This cop should have been at the very least fired. When you don’t hold people accountable for little things, eventually those transgressions start getting larger, and the people committing them become more brazen.

When you don’t hold sworn agents of the state accountable, then they act like they are above the law. They begin to see themselves as a separate and distinct group of people – good old tribal mindset kicking in. That’s why they circle the wagons or “thin blue line” crap. They’re just acting exactly how a cultural tribe would act. Add in to this the fact that police typically have a union that fights tooth and nail to not only ensure that laziness, sloppiness, and general incompetence aren’t punished, but also actively engage in politics and extracting the greatest amount of resources from the people they serve, and you begin to understand why people react negatively to cops.

flashoverride on January 27, 2016 at 8:36 PM

Good. Yes, taxpayers get stuck with the bill in the end, but this killing was unacceptable, and the settlement sent a clear message.

Rusty Nail on January 27, 2016 at 12:57 PM

Two remedies:

1) Instead of the tax payers having to underwrite this mischief, the settlements should come from the union pension funds. This sort of thing will end over night.

2) It is pretty clear that police just can’t resist shooting things. Like teen-age sex, we are told, they are going to do it any way so we just need to make it safer. In the case of the police, they should carry nothing more than .22LR. They can still continue to get their jollies gunning down various people and critters, yet the victims stand a better chance to survive these assaults.

If the person of interest truly needs killing, it is pretty clear fellow gang bangers are more than willing and able to take out the trash without getting the city treasury involved.

Reuben Hick on January 28, 2016 at 6:50 AM