Boom: North Korea claims to have detonated a hydrogen bomb

posted at 8:01 am on January 6, 2016 by Jazz Shaw

North Korea has been threatening this for a while and now, at 10 am local time, they claim to have detonated a hydrogen bomb. The only real indication that something happened thus far is that they managed to trigger a 5.1 magnitude earthquake. (CNN)

The South Korean defense ministry said it too could not immediately confirm the test’s success, but the country’s foreign ministry hastily convened an emergency meeting. Officials in Japan were also holding discussions.

The test took place at 10 a.m. local time, the regime said in a televised statement.

The seismic event, which measured the event at a magnitude of 5.1, occurred 19 kilometers (12 miles) east-northeast of Sungjibaegam, the United States Geological Survey said.

If it’s true, this would be a significant upping of the ante in an already tense area of the world. Their previous tests were all of plutonium based fission weapons with yields measured in kilotons. A hydrogen bomb can produce blasts measured in megatons and do a lot more damage. But did they really pull it off? It’s apparently going to take a couple of days before all the data is analyzed, but some experts are already expressing doubts. (Time Magazine)

Notably, the prior atomic tests in North Korea resulted in seismic activity of a similar force as Wednesday’s explosion, rather than a more powerful tremor that might be associated with a hydrogen payload. “I doubt the ability of North Korea to conduct a real hydrogen-bomb test,” says Cai Jian, of the Center for Korean Studies at Fudan University in Shanghai. “In the past, they always exaggerated their power.”

Pyongyang’s nuclear experimentation has angered its only political ally, Beijing, which has signed off on U.N. sanctions punishing North Korea for its weapons program.

There was a time when it looked like China might finally get tired of North Korea’s provocations and bluster and throw them under the bus. As long as their biggest concern was shipping enough products to sell in the United States and ensuring we were healthy enough to keep paying the interest on the massive debt they hold over our heads it was a sound move to stay on our good side. Lately, though, relations between Washington and Beijing have been pretty much in the toilet and they’ve been growing increasingly bold in their military expansion. China may be North Korea’s only true remaining “friend” in the world right now, but Kim Jong-un is a useful stick to poke in Barack Obama’s eye if China feels like stirring the pot a bit.

With that in mind, I’m not quite as hopeful as some folks at the Atlantic and elsewhere who seem to think that Kim has finally “gone too far” and that the Chinese might at last get on board with the idea of choking off the little nation’s supplies. They may as well keep them on the playing field if things are going to get tense with the west again. But all of that comes back to the question of whether or not this was a real test or just vaporware to celebrate Kim’s birthday. (Which is coming up shortly.) As noted by the analysts above, their older, fission bombs generated earthquakes of about the same size as this one. If this was actually a megaton size hydrogen bomb, shouldn’t there have been a bigger boom? I’m not familiar enough with all of the technology involved to say precisely how we will make the final determination, but I’m sure there’s some sort of a “signature” for a hydrogen bomb explosion that we’ll be looking for.

In the end, though, North Korea was already a nuclear state. This doesn’t really seem to change the geopolitical landscape all that much and it won’t until Kim decides to actually use one on somebody. And that would spell the immediate end of his nation, so it’s probably not time to panic over this.

HBomb


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Comments

Thanks Bill and Madeline.

fossten on January 6, 2016 at 8:03 AM

Thank you Bill and Hillary. And Madeline as Fossten pointed out, maybe an even WORSE Secretary of State than Her Royal Thighness was.

Nuclear North Korea was the Clinton Legacy. Nuclear Iran is Obama’s.

ConstantineXI on January 6, 2016 at 8:07 AM

(I keep moving this post all around HA)

I have a problem with this coverage in the Daily Mail…

North Korea ‘begins 2016 with the thrilling sound of our first hydrogen bomb’ but experts say test FAILED because resulting quake was too small – as UN Security Council meet to discuss response.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3386367/Magnitude-5-1-earthquake-detected-close-North-Korean-nuclear-test-site-trigger-concerns-country-conducted-new-atomic-explosion.html

Or I should say I have a problem with some of the reporting.
Look at this image that Daily Mail has with the article…

http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2016/01/06/07/2FD53ED000000578-3386367-image-a-54_1452064525999.jpg

It is described in the lede to the article as ” Punggye-ri nuclear test site.”
The picture shows a small mushroom cloud in a partly cloudy sky. Supposedly this is a picture of the blast.

The picture seems to be a screen grab from a YTN news video. YTN is a 24-hour news channel in South Korea and it appear to be from a Chinese news broadcast.

The screen grab has a Xinhau/Rex/Shutterstock water mark at the bottom left-hand corner. This photo comes to the stock photo service of Shutterstock by way of way of Xinhau News Agency (China). But bottom line, it’s a archived stock image from Shutterstock, not (as captioned by Daily Mail) a image of the Jan. 6, 2015 test.

Remember I mentioned the sky was partly cloudy in the mushroom cloud picture? The nearest town to the North Korean Punggye-ri nuclear test site is Kimchaek, 54 miles away. The weather forecast for Kimchaek today is clear skies.

I cannot find this image released by any other current news outlet other than the Daily Mail and the YTN China news service..

They may have detonated something, below ground, one of their standard nuclear toys that they have been playing with, but the photo with the mail article (which will probably get populated throughout blogs and other media outlets) has nothing to do with this incident.

Don’t believe everything you read or view.

(This analyst is my own)

Walter L. Newton on January 6, 2016 at 8:07 AM

Thanks Bill and Madeline.

fossten on January 6, 2016 at 8:03 AM

Try to keep up. The newly minted troll over here says it was BOOOOSH!!!

The moderators really need to start checking IP traffic on this site. We’ve had a few newbies show up out of nowhere (no open registration in a while…), spouting crap we’ve heard before, almost word for word.

Recycled trolls stink.

CurtZHP on January 6, 2016 at 8:07 AM

It’s all good.

Dennis Rodman is on the way over there to set his little buddy straight.

BacaDog on January 6, 2016 at 8:10 AM

Just North Korea feeling ignored, what with AQ, ISIS and the coming Saudi Arabia – Iran war.

rbj on January 6, 2016 at 8:14 AM

The moderators really need to start checking IP traffic on this site. We’ve had a few newbies show up out of nowhere (no open registration in a while…), spouting crap we’ve heard before, almost word for word.

Recycled trolls stink.

CurtZHP on January 6, 2016 at 8:07 AM

You think half the trolls aren’t Ed, Allah, and leftist morons they’ve had as writers here before like Rothman and Millard?

Jazz Shaw is the closest thing to a conservative here.

ConstantineXI on January 6, 2016 at 8:14 AM

Just North Korea feeling ignored, what with AQ, ISIS and the coming Saudi Arabia – Iran war.

rbj on January 6, 2016 at 8:14 AM

I wonder what kind of terrorist act Obama will pull to get attention after next 1/20 once he realizes he can be ignored?

(assuming, of course, that he leaves)

ConstantineXI on January 6, 2016 at 8:16 AM

Lil Kim just ate a breakfast jack burrito.

Younggod on January 6, 2016 at 8:19 AM

basing validity of the claim (which I also doubt) on the size of the blast is misleading.
it assumes the physical package was same size as plutonium/fission based ones which would then be an increase in blast/seismic delivery.
it would also, most likely, be too powerful to test in the manner they have been testing.
if you consider that they used a smaller package the resulting blast/seismic COULD be the same as the physically larger fission devices.
however I am very leery of this claim.

dmacleo on January 6, 2016 at 8:22 AM

CurtZHP on January 6, 2016 at 8:07 AM

I’ll keep an eye out for him, thanks.

You think half the trolls aren’t Ed, Allah, and leftist morons they’ve had as writers here before like Rothman and Millard?

Jazz Shaw is the closest thing to a conservative here.

ConstantineXI on January 6, 2016 at 8:14 AM

I know, I never thought that would be the case. MM would be ashamed.

fossten on January 6, 2016 at 8:26 AM

If Kim stays in power, one day we are going to have to nuke them.

oh well.

captnjoe on January 6, 2016 at 8:26 AM

Hydrogen bomb at 6kt?

Smells rotten fish in this story.

Limerick on January 6, 2016 at 8:27 AM

“…a useful stick to poke in Barack Obama’s eye if China feels like stirring the pot a bit”. I’m of divided opinion – is that a mixed metaphor, or if it is the same stick going in the eye as stirring the pot, is it not a mixed metaphor?

Surellin on January 6, 2016 at 8:28 AM

well past time to gift nukes to Japan and South Korea.

WryTrvllr on January 6, 2016 at 8:29 AM

MM would be ashamed.

fossten on January 6, 2016 at 8:26 AM

Michelle Malkin contributes to Breitbart every now and then. Not this place. What does that tell you?

ConstantineXI on January 6, 2016 at 8:30 AM

they managed to trigger a 5.1 magnitude earthquake

No. Causing a 5.1 magnitude event is absolutely not the same thing as “triggering an earthquake”.

No atomic test I know of ever “triggered an earthquake”.

Bat Chain Puller on January 6, 2016 at 8:31 AM

well past time to gift nukes to Japan and South Korea.

WryTrvllr on January 6, 2016 at 8:29 AM

Obama would “solve” this problem by gifting nukes to Indonesia.

ConstantineXI on January 6, 2016 at 8:31 AM

Thanks Bill and Madeline.
fossten on January

They’re already rationalizing it; if they’re thinking about it at all.

Cleombrotus on January 6, 2016 at 8:32 AM

As to the issue of how strong of an earthquake the blast generated, I would like to point to two tests that the US conducted in the early 60’s in Mississippi. The goal of the tests were to determine if it is possible to cheat on underground testing. They drilled into the largest salt dome in the US and set off a relatively small nuke. Two years later they drilled into the void created by the first test and suspended another device in the approximate center of the void and detonated it. The intent was to determine if setting off a device suspended in an open cavity would muffle the blast enough to give a false sense of the size of the blast and indicate a much smaller device. We learned that that is indeed the case. It is my understanding that the area in which they set off the device is riddled with large caverns, so it is entirely likely that they used the same trick to muffle this device.

Rorschach on January 6, 2016 at 8:33 AM

Hydrogen bomb at 6kt?

Smells rotten fish in this story.

Limerick on January 6, 2016 at 8:27 AM

The yield is pitiful even for a fission device. I wouldn’t be surprised if North Korea has been running a con for decades just to extort funds and concessions from the West.

NotCoach on January 6, 2016 at 8:33 AM

Hydrogen bomb at 6kt?

Smells rotten fish in this story.

Limerick on January 6, 2016 at 8:27 AM

It fizzled. So did ours early on…

ConstantineXI on January 6, 2016 at 8:35 AM

Hydrogen bomb at 6kt?

Smells rotten fish in this story.

Limerick on January 6, 2016 at 8:27 AM

It will take a few days to verify, however, there are two indisputable physical characteristic of a hydrogen bomb detonation that cannot be hidden nor faked.

1) an enormous electromagnet pules detectable by satellites in orbit, and 2) an enormous release of Krypton gas, also detectable by satellites in orbit. These are the technological signature which allowed the US to monitor Soviet nuclear detonations back during the Cold War.

As for a 6kt hydrogen detonation, yea, very doable, the US has gotten them down to about .25kt.

oscarwilde on January 6, 2016 at 8:41 AM

A Miniature H-Bomb?
Must have been detonated by a miniature A-Bomb.

TimBuk3 on January 6, 2016 at 8:45 AM

they managed to trigger a 5.1 magnitude earthquake

No. Causing a 5.1 magnitude event is absolutely not the same thing as “triggering an earthquake”.

No atomic test I know of ever “triggered an earthquake”.

Bat Chain Puller on January 6, 2016 at 8:31 AM

Very true, nuclear explosions may produce 5.1 magnitude shockwaves, but seismographiclly those shockwaves look nothing at all like earthquakes.

oscarwilde on January 6, 2016 at 8:46 AM

oscarwilde on January 6, 2016 at 8:41 AM

Krypton is a fission byproduct, not fusion.

NotCoach on January 6, 2016 at 8:46 AM

ConstantineXI on January 6, 2016 at 8:07 AM

Not even close. As bad as Albright was she doesn’t hold a candle to the worldwide chaos of Madame Smart Power.

MJBrutus on January 6, 2016 at 8:48 AM

oscarwilde on January 6, 2016 at 8:41 AM

Krypton is a fission byproduct, not fusion.

NotCoach on January 6, 2016 at 8:46 AM

Are perhaps familiar with the initiation process of a fusion explosion? I’ll give you a hint… It involved a fission detonation.

oscarwilde on January 6, 2016 at 8:50 AM

In the end, though, North Korea was already a nuclear state. This doesn’t really seem to change the geopolitical landscape all that much and it won’t until Kim decides to actually use one on somebody. And that would spell the immediate end of his nation, so it’s probably not time to panic over this.

Want to bet?

Steve Eggleston on January 6, 2016 at 8:51 AM

In the end, though, North Korea was already a nuclear state. This doesn’t really seem to change the geopolitical landscape all that much and it won’t until Kim decides to actually use one on somebody. And that would spell the immediate end of his nation, so it’s probably not time to panic over this.

Want to bet?

Steve Eggleston on January 6, 2016 at 8:51 AM

Exactly, since North Korea is reputed to be doing the actual heavy lifting for the Iranian nuclear weapons program.

oscarwilde on January 6, 2016 at 8:53 AM

Are perhaps familiar with the initiation process of a fusion explosion? I’ll give you a hint… It involved a fission detonation.

oscarwilde on January 6, 2016 at 8:50 AM

Sigh. Evidence of a fission reaction is not evidence of a fusion reaction.

NotCoach on January 6, 2016 at 8:56 AM

Try to keep up. The newly minted troll over here says it was BOOOOSH!!!

CurtZHP on January 6, 2016 at 8:07 AM

.
He’s not new. He just hasn’t been around (in use) for a while. Check the site search and you will see that ArthurMachado has comments as far back as 2012. He must be primarily an election year commenter. I haven’t read any of his prior comments.
.
site:hotair.com “ArthurMachado on”

ExpressoBold on January 6, 2016 at 9:01 AM

North Korea has been threatening this for a while and now, at 10 am local time, they claim to have detonated a hydrogen bomb.

Big ba-da boom!

Johnnyreb on January 6, 2016 at 9:05 AM

ExpressoBold on January 6, 2016 at 9:01 AM

I stand corrected.

CurtZHP on January 6, 2016 at 9:06 AM

oscarwilde on January 6, 2016 at 8:50 AM

Sigh. Evidence of a fission reaction is not evidence of a fusion reaction.

NotCoach on January 6, 2016 at 8:56 AM

While this is true, it is also true that a fusion detonation still produces the same technological signature. At 6kt, it would be virtually impossible to distinguish the difference between the two. (you would need air samples of the radioisotopes released, and those have half-lifes rated between just a few minutes and a couple of weeks)

Had the detonation taken place underwater (in the ocean) it would be a whole lot easier to confirm whether it was a fission or a fusion detonation as fission and fusion detonation have completely different Deuterium and Tritium isotope release rates.

I used to be a Health Physics technician at San Onofre back in the 1980’s.

oscarwilde on January 6, 2016 at 9:07 AM

I used to be a Health Physics technician at San Onofre back in the 1980’s.

oscarwilde on January 6, 2016 at 9:07 AM

The titties! :)

artist on January 6, 2016 at 9:20 AM

oscarwilde on January 6, 2016 at 9:07 AM

The titties! :)

artist on January 6, 2016 at 9:20 AM

Radioisotopes don’t have titties. (Health Physics Technicians monitor radioisotope levels)

oscarwilde on January 6, 2016 at 9:25 AM

There’s an actual multistage fission-initiated fusion reaction, and then there’s a fizzle. The latter usually caused by impurities in the tritium in the “well”. (Age of same being the usual culprit in production weapons.)

One thing often overlooked is that you really can’t build a fusion device with a lower yield than your fission trigger. Meaning, even a “tactical” H-bomb will always leave the radiation byproducts, etc., of the initial-stage fission package.

A 5.1 magnitude earth tremor does not equal a 5+ megaton thermonuclear event. They are two entirely different things. Depending on rock strata, etc., a crustal or subcrustal shift (which is what an “earthquake” actually is) could be caused by any number of things, including a purely fission event in the right (or wrong) place.

Before I buy any nuclear event being responsible, I’d want to see things like previous history of quake activity in the area, exact timing and “shape” of P and S wave output, duration of the tremors, etc., even before I started looking for fission remnants and such.

Not to mention how long the lag between the “bang” and the announcement from Pyongyang was. For all we know, they had a 5.1 quake and after half an hour decided to claim it was an H-bomb test.

Mini-Kim isn’t exactly noted for his honesty, nor is he noted for the solidity of his contact with reality. His minions, however, are noted for saying or doing anything it takes to keep him happy. Which generally involves lying their a$$es off.

clear ether

eon

eon on January 6, 2016 at 9:30 AM

Radioisotopes don’t have titties. (Health Physics Technicians monitor radioisotope levels)

oscarwilde on January 6, 2016 at 9:25 AM

But you might, if you get too close! ;-)

CurtZHP on January 6, 2016 at 9:32 AM

There’s an actual multistage fission-initiated fusion reaction, and then there’s a fizzle. The latter usually caused by impurities in the tritium in the “well”. (Age of same being the usual culprit in production weapons.)

One thing often overlooked is that you really can’t build a fusion device with a lower yield than your fission trigger. Meaning, even a “tactical” H-bomb will always leave the radiation byproducts, etc., of the initial-stage fission package.

A 5.1 magnitude earth tremor does not equal a 5+ megaton thermonuclear event. They are two entirely different things. Depending on rock strata, etc., a crustal or subcrustal shift (which is what an “earthquake” actually is) could be caused by any number of things, including a purely fission event in the right (or wrong) place.

Before I buy any nuclear event being responsible, I’d want to see things like previous history of quake activity in the area, exact timing and “shape” of P and S wave output, duration of the tremors, etc., even before I started looking for fission remnants and such.

Not to mention how long the lag between the “bang” and the announcement from Pyongyang was. For all we know, they had a 5.1 quake and after half an hour decided to claim it was an H-bomb test.

Mini-Kim isn’t exactly noted for his honesty, nor is he noted for the solidity of his contact with reality. His minions, however, are noted for saying or doing anything it takes to keep him happy. Which generally involves lying their a$$es off.

clear ether

eon

eon on January 6, 2016 at 9:30 AM

Yup, a 24 hour window view of seismic activity plus the seismic activity of the event in question would settle the issue. The P and S waves from a nuclear detonation are completely different from those produced by a earthquake.

Nuclear detonations produce near instantaneous waves that die away very abruptly, earthquakes do not. Earthquakes produce pre-event P and S waves as well as slowly trailing off P and S waves.

oscarwilde on January 6, 2016 at 9:40 AM

This doesn’t really seem to change the geopolitical landscape all that much and it won’t until Kim decides to actually use one on somebody. And that would spell the immediate end of his nation, so it’s probably not time to panic over this.

So you’re saying that the only thing preventing ‘local’ nuclear wars is the sanity of North Korean leaders. Oh Happy Day!

Fenris on January 6, 2016 at 9:52 AM

O/T: Seriously? The DJIA down 200+ points in the first 20 minutes for the second time in a week… C’mon, China, use some muscle with the hermit kingdom!
.
Yeah, I blame China

ExpressoBold on January 6, 2016 at 9:56 AM

Radioisotopes don’t have titties. (Health Physics Technicians monitor radioisotope levels)

oscarwilde on January 6, 2016 at 9:25 AM

Oy.

The view from I-5.

artist on January 6, 2016 at 10:00 AM

The view from I-5.

artist on January 6, 2016 at 10:00 AM

ROTFLMAO… OH… Those titties… (Yea we used to called the Dolly Partons titties)

oscarwilde on January 6, 2016 at 10:10 AM

China invented Hydrogen Bombs.

Oil Can on January 6, 2016 at 10:19 AM

China invented Hydrogen Bombs.

Oil Can on January 6, 2016 at 10:19 AM

Don’t be silly… <— in best Ensign Chekov voice, vas inwentede by little old lady from Moscow…

oscarwilde on January 6, 2016 at 10:36 AM

China may be North Korea’s only true remaining “friend” in the world right now

Uh…Cuba?
You know, that little island off our coast where they could easily launch a few high altitude nukes from and cripple the country.

LoganSix on January 6, 2016 at 10:39 AM

China invented Hydrogen Bombs.

Oil Can on January 6, 2016 at 10:19 AM

Fixed.

/darkcurrent

CurtZHP on January 6, 2016 at 10:51 AM

Will obama be angry when he reads about in the newspaper tomorow. I bet he tell everyone not to worry and the norks are under control and he is unhappy that cable tv making a big deal out of this.

jaywemm on January 6, 2016 at 11:03 AM

All this speculation is interesting but, in the end, useless. If they don’t have a bomb it is assured that they will get one. When they do get one then rest assured that Iran has it too. Iran is just using NoK as their test bed so it can’t be said that they’re developing nuke weapons. Iran is funding the Nork’s effort. Through inaction we have lost the ability to curtail weapon development of both Iran and North Korea. Their attainment of the holy grail of destruction is, at this point, certain. Remember though, we have nothing to worry about.

Oldnuke on January 6, 2016 at 11:28 AM

The moderators really need to start checking IP traffic on this site. We’ve had a few newbies show up out of nowhere (no open registration in a while…), spouting crap we’ve heard before, almost word for word.

Recycled trolls stink.

CurtZHP on January 6, 2016 at 8:07 AM

You don’t really understand how IP addresses work, do you?

DarkCurrent on January 6, 2016 at 12:27 PM

Sigh. Evidence of a fission reaction is not evidence of a fusion reaction.

NotCoach on January 6, 2016 at 8:56 AM

Dude, the guy’s not only a rock star but also a world class theoretical physicist. I’m sure he knows what he’s talking about.

/s

DarkCurrent on January 6, 2016 at 12:32 PM

Oldnuke is correct on all points, 80% of any engineering endeavor is knowing whether it can even be done or not. When we developed nukes, we did not know if it could be done for certain so we had to do a lot of basic research and make a lot of mistakes along the way in order to figure that out. Everyone since then has piggybacked on our basic research and they already know it is possible because we’ve already done it. Physics is Physics and you can’t hide that fact, so it is merely a matter of time before they work out the missing variables, so presuming that they will take the same developmental pathway as we did is foolish. They already know which pathway they want to follow, they don’t have to learn to crawl before they walk or run. They can go straight to run.

Rorschach on January 6, 2016 at 12:33 PM

China invented Hydrogen Bombs.

Oil Can on January 6, 2016 at 10:19 AM

China did invent bombs, but not the hydrogen bomb. They’ve only had those since the sixties.

DarkCurrent on January 6, 2016 at 12:38 PM

Rorschach on January 6, 2016 at 12:33 PM

From A bomb to H bomb:

US- 7 years

USSR- 4 years

UK- 4 1/2 years

China- 2 years 2 months

Oldnuke on January 6, 2016 at 1:09 PM

Through inaction we have lost the ability to curtail weapon development of both Iran and North Korea.

Oldnuke on January 6, 2016 at 11:28 AM

Oh, and you were doing so well before that.

There’s nothing we can do about any country that is really determined to acquire a nuclear weapon unless we are willing to invade and depose their government.

Tlaloc on January 6, 2016 at 1:23 PM

Will obama be angry when he reads about in the newspaper tomorow. I bet he tell everyone not to worry and the norks are under control and he is unhappy that cable tv making a big deal out of this.

jaywemm on January 6, 2016 at 11:03 AM

I expect a news conference about this tomorrow, with some Presidential tears in accompaniment.

To be followed by several days of comments from media ‘personalities’, various presidential candidates, multiple blog posts, etc., debating the sincerity of the tears, and the President’s EO issued to require a higher fee for background checks on anyone purchasing H-Bombs, in order to help reduce gun violence.

s1im on January 6, 2016 at 1:45 PM

Don’t worry. North Korea passed the Obama administration’s background checks so all is fine and dandy.

billrowe on January 6, 2016 at 3:09 PM

Boom: North Korea claims to have detonated a hydrogen bomb

BS. Same goes for their nuclear bomb.

Dr. ZhivBlago on January 6, 2016 at 3:25 PM

BS. Same goes for their nuclear bomb.

Dr. ZhivBlago on January 6, 2016 at 3:25 PM

Exactly. No way a country like NK could have developed 70 year old technology so quickly.

DarkCurrent on January 6, 2016 at 4:32 PM

dmacleo on January 6, 2016 at 8:22 AM

.
Pretty much agree here. If they have the Pu239 A package down to engineering, next step is working up a radiation implosion design for the B package. How some ever! a simple boosted fission package, no matter how much reduced in size would still likely make a bigger boom than their current marks. You still need all those zippy little fast neutrons, x-rays and gamma rays to make the B package light off, and they do increase the fissioning of the tamper/pusher.
.
All that considered, I’m skeptical, as no-one has reported that they saw a ‘double thump’ in the seismic data caused by something like a Teller-Ulam design. If you recall, both the Israelis and the South Africans tested weapons way out in the South Atlantic that were reported as ‘squibs’ because there was no second pulse reported by any of the Swift type satellites. They were not squibs.

‘Nuff said.

meerbock on January 6, 2016 at 6:04 PM

Are perhaps familiar with the initiation process of a fusion explosion? I’ll give you a hint… It involved a fission detonation.

oscarwilde on January 6, 2016 at 8:50 AM

.
Too, I’d suspect U239. Np238, Pu238and Pu240 along with maybe some Thorium isotopes, depending on engineering, but the double flash for the Swifts is the key item. Durned hard to get air samples out of a cave in the NORK. True for Krypton as well. Not difficult to have your fireball seal the emplacement tunnel, as with the salt dome shots mention up-thread.

meerbock on January 6, 2016 at 6:18 PM

Reality Check: We now are living in a world of “Things To Come” (1936). Where we stand the chance of being instantly incinerated on a moments notice. The mushroom could start to sprout. Dose my opinion matter? YES! Will it be headed? NO. Love Hot Air so here goes anyway.

Obama’s Middle East policies have draw so many ignored lines in the sand that it is becoming confused with the Suez Cannel. In my opinion we need to cut off all ties with all in the Middle East, with draw all troupes, all civilians and all business. Surround, surveillance, isolate and sanction until they are ready to become part of the world family. I know its a big area but with todays electronic means and a few true allies , a pretty good job of it can be done.

North Korea has been a repressive Government for generations. I believe that although there are those that escape from it that most have just excepted it as a way of life. This means that the majority of the country will most likely support their government if attacked. Bad news for regime change.

They have Saber Rattled almost every 4-6 months and declared war on us. We laugh it off and move on. This policy will ultimately cost lives, maybe in the millions. Next time they come even close to declaring war on us we need to hold an emergency joint session of congress and state that we except their declaration of war and within minutes bomb and strafe from the North to the
south with more ordnance then we used in WWII, Korea, Vietnam and the Middle East combined. Then let South Korea move North and pick up the peaces and let the world’s other despots know that their action will no longer be tolerated.

Tough call? YES! But the alternative is World break down with massive deaths on a scale that can not yet be imagined.

jpcpt03 on January 6, 2016 at 11:32 PM

… most have just excepted it as a way of life.

… hold an emergency joint session of congress and state that we except their declaration of war and within minutes bomb and strafe from the North to the
south

jpcpt03 on January 6, 2016 at 11:32 PM

The word is ‘accept’. No one will accept your opinion if you can’t even write your native language. (Assuming it’s your native language. If not well then such basic errors may be acceptable.)

DarkCurrent on January 7, 2016 at 2:12 PM