Nuclear winter descends upon Scott Walker supporters

posted at 10:01 pm on September 24, 2015 by Matt Vespa

Walker is gone. His presidential candidacy has been nuked, and his supporters are now left dealing with impact winter. So, what the hell happened? As I wrote in a previous post, Walker had the backstory and legislative record to formulate a narrative to carry a national campaign, or at least that’s what it seemed on paper. Alas, that wasn’t the case. And from what has been reported; this campaign certainly had its fair share of problems, ranging from ignorance on the issues, staffing, fundraising, and, of course, The Donald.

Politico reported that Walker simply wasn’t ready for the national stage. His record of invincibility over the concerted political efforts of the left to destroy him overshadowed the fact that just five years ago he was just a county executive. That’s quite the political leap. The piece also noted that the governor knew little about immigration, the Export-Import bank, and foreign policy–three issues that proved to be red meat for conservatives. On immigration, Walker should be given some latitude; Wisconsin isn’t necessarily on the front line of curing illegal immigration, nor is it as big a problem than in, say, Arizona or Texas. Walker’s shakiness on the issues was encapsulated with his changing positions. He had three positions on birthright citizenship in a week, walked a waffled line on immigration, punted on evolution, and gave an awkward answer regarding Obama’s religious background. These are things that Republican primary voters, and donors, don’t want to see.

What about staffing?

It evidently grew too big, supported by a fundraising network that would never be able to sustain it consistently. By the end of his presidential bid, Walker had around 90 salaried staff. Additionally, these staffers didn’t know Walker well, or his Wisconsin roots. Most disconcertingly was the reported marginalization of Walker staffers who were responsible for putting the governor in the mansion–and keeping him there. Former Walker aide Liz Mair took to Twitter for a lengthy autopsy on why the Walker candidacy died a quick death; Walker’s staff being some of those observations in that postmortem thread. We’ll get back to this in a second. Back to staffing, Walker’s wife, Tonette, also didn’t find her husband’s campaign manager–Rick Wiley– all that impressive either. In fact, there was chatter among Walker’s donors that Riley should be booted from the campaign, or have his duties split by hiring other operatives:

Campaign sources said Tonette Walker, the Wisconsin first lady, had never warmed to Wiley. During a visit to campaign HQ shortly after the first debate, she wanted to know why her husband hadn’t used all his allotted time in answers (a mistake he repeated in the second debate). She made it clear she saw the lapse as a staff failure, which aides took as a shot at Wiley.

Walker advisers said they were considering bringing back longtime aides, Gilkes or R.J. Johnson, to replace or layer Wiley. Tonette Walker, along with Grebe, then began reaching out to a small group of longtime Walker supporters and inviting them to a meeting at the governor’s mansion on Monday morning — the session that resulted in the campaign’s end.

Wiley wasn’t invited. Two Walker confidants said his future was among the agenda items in the two-hour meeting.

One person close to Tonette Walker said she recognized the deficiencies on the campaign staff and was willing to speak out about them. “People mistake her honesty for combativeness,” this person said. “I’m sorry the staff didn’t like her reality check.” Aly Higgins, Tonette Walker’s personal aide during the campaign, said: “She is protective of her family and has strong instincts, and a clear view of right and wrong.”

Money became a huge issue. To shake up the campaign Riley did plan on reducing staff to 20 people, moving the campaign headquarters from Madison to Des Moines, and mounting a last stand in Iowa, according to Mike Allen and Alex Isenstadt:

Walker, floundering in debates and on the stump, was facing such a sudden drought in donations that even those drastic moves wouldn’t have guaranteed solvency.

We built the machine that we needed to get a governor in just phenomenal shape to take a stage in a presidential debate,” Wiley said. “I think sometimes it’s lost on people the largeness of the job. I think people just look at it and say, ‘Wow! Yeah, you know, it’s like he’s a governor and he was in a recall’ and blah, blah, blah — he’s ready.

“It’s just not like that. It is really, really difficult. … I’m just saying, you know, like it’s a f—ing bitch, man. It really is.”

After the first Republican debate, the money faucet began to tighten, evident when their Labor Day fundraising push which the Walker campaign hoped would rake in $500,000 only brought in $184,000 (via WaPo):

In a little more than two months, his presidential bid had amassed a debt of roughly $700,000, campaign manager Rick Wiley told the governor in a call Sunday night. A pared-down effort focused on staying afloat in Iowa would still cost around $1 million a month because of ongoing costs associated with ballot access, accounting and vendor contracts.

“It’s going to be tough to raise that million a month, I’ll be honest with you,” Wiley said he told Walker, according to an account he gave The Washington Post on Tuesday evening.

[…]

Donations began dwindling in mid-August after Walker’s tentative performance in the first Republican debate, according to several people familiar with the figures. The campaign tried to ramp up fundraising over Labor Day, with a series of events that officials hoped would bring in $500,000. In the end, they netted $184,000, Wiley said.

Another yuge factor was Donald Trump. Trumpmentum has swept the GOP field, and the Donald remains the king of the castle at present. Walker was leading in the polls in Iowa, but the combination of not understanding the Republican base–another Mair observation–a lackluster debate performance, and his inability to use the media attention that was thrust upon him when Walker announced led his numbers to sink rapidly. As Tom Bevan wrote on Real Clear Politics, “Donald Trump ate his lunch.” It also doesn’t help that you deal with Trump by trying to out-Trump him, or be in a similar vein as he is on the issues:

Walker seemed to be the candidate who was most unnerved by Trump, and was among the most willing to modify his positions (specifically immigration and China) in reaction to Trump’s overt nativism. This made Walker look like a waffler at best and an unprincipled politician at worst, which undermined the very rationale of his candidacy. At the same time, Trump managed to steal Walker’s “outsider” appeal as well.

Jonathan Last at The Weekly Standard also noted the Trump factor in contributing to Walker’s demise. On the other hand, Noah Rothman of Commentary disagreed, saying that Walker’s serial flubbing on the issues is more to blame.

“At a certain point, it’s not them; it’s you,” he wrote.

Nate Cohn of The New York Times agreed with Rothman, adding that Walker’s departure from the 2016 ring shows “the difficulty of maintaining a broad coalition in a party deeply divided between conservatives and moderates, populists and business interests, the grass-roots and the elites.” Walker was well positioned to reach voters from all of those groups, but simply was not quick enough to adapt:

Mr. Walker faltered so quickly because he simply was not skilled enough to navigate the competing pressures of appealing to the party’s establishment at the same time as arousing its base. It was much like the story of Rick Perry.

Though the entry of Donald Trump into the race made things harder for all the Republican candidates, Mr. Trump can’t be blamed entirely for Walker’s troubles. Mr. Walker was tied with Mr. Bush for second place in national polls heading into the first debate, long after Mr. Trump took a lead in those polls.

[…]

Mr. Walker, to put it gently, did not handle this pressure well. His instinct was to move to the right as fast as possible at any point of vulnerability. He staked out a conservative position on birthright citizenship and a fringe position on considering a wall at the Canadian border. These moves alienated party elites and weren’t credible to conservative voters. He quickly reversed positions; in the end, he reassured no one.

Certainly, the combination is fatal; not being able to deal with the media on questions about policy, while your opponent can turn even the worst story about him into gunpowder for his supporters, which leads to boosting poll numbers. Yet, perhaps the case could be made that Walker’s reported unpreparedness saved the party a lot of trouble if he started to fall to pieces later on in the campaign.

As Reihan Salem wrote in Slate, regarding policy–Trump has one thing on his side that’s proving to be a yuge advantage over his opponents: no one really expects him to say anything substantive on how he will make America great again, or how he will become the greatest jobs creator God has ever put forth on this Earth. Yet, he also added that Walker isn’t out of the 2016 orbit yet; there’s still the matter of picking a running mate. Liz Mair added that he could be a solid pick for a cabinet position, but not Labor Secretary or a slot on the National Labor Relations Board. She did say that agriculture was a possibility, citing the time during the 2012 recall how dairy farmers told her how they loved Walker, and his campaign devoted time to the subject of agriculture. As for vice president or running again in 2020, Mair wrote that they’re long shots, albeit with positive angles to make an argument for each scenario. Then again, the latter is sort of a punch to the gut given that it’s predicated on a Republican defeat in 2016. She did say Walker would be better than Romney, who was able to win the nomination during his second shot at the nomination, since Walker won’t have Romneycare hanging around his neck. Walker may be out, but he still has a future. His career isn’t done. What he does is up to him.

What do you think about Walker, his campaign, and potential future in the party?

UPDATE: Walker’s reportedly nixing the idea of taking a cabinet post.


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Comments

Walker … Texas Ranger?

funny there was a lot less post mortem on the Perry candidacy.

PolAgnostic on September 24, 2015 at 10:06 PM

And from what has been reported; this campaign certainly had its fair share of problems, ranging from ignorance on the issues, staffing, fundraising,

Two of those three (issues and fundraising) are directly his fault on his immigration position.

If he had taken and stuck with a harder policy, then he would have lost big donors only (the grassroots would have stuck with him longer). Instead he took all positions and that cost him both of those camps. The blame for those flops is (in)directly the fault of who he had on his staff.

So no, Donald didn’t do him in.

nobar on September 24, 2015 at 10:11 PM

Walker was being touted and pushed as a savior by desperate Republicans for years. You gotta expect a lengthy autopsy.

And what universe is Noah Rothman getting quoted?

Dongemaharu on September 24, 2015 at 10:13 PM

I’m sorry to see him go. I liked him a lot and, based upon his career so far, thought he would have been a good president.

As for “nuclear winter” – nah. I doubt anyone is losing sleep over his withdrawal – including him. In fact he’s probably sleeping better now than he has in months.

Rod on September 24, 2015 at 10:13 PM

…better luck next time!

JugEarsButtHurt on September 24, 2015 at 10:13 PM

The piece also noted that the governor knew little about immigration… On immigration, Walker should be given some latitude; Wisconsin isn’t necessarily on the front line of curing illegal immigration, nor is it as big a problem than in, say, Arizona or Texas

I don’t buy that. I mean I don’t think that Walker was “so innocent” and knew nothing about immigration. The fact is that the average Joe on the street knows fully about the immigration problem.

And, the Wisconsin Dairy Farm supported CoC is a big pusher of lax immigration, and that’s exactly the policies Walker advocated for years: http://dailycaller.com/2013/11/22/gov-walker-wants-to-open-the-door-to-immigrants/

But, after New Years, Walker was getting excoriated on his lax immigration position, and so in April Walker did “a 180° flip” on immigration, people got excited, except Walker’s donors weren’t so excited, and told Walker to be quiet on the issue or walk it back, and the people noticed that Walker was not following through in any enthusiastic way on his immigration flip, so they got unexcited about Walker.

Walker had some other issues too, notably not wanting to answer questions about the issues. Oh well.

anotherJoe on September 24, 2015 at 10:15 PM

The ironic thing is that he made more enemies than anyone as a governor, righteously so, but dreaded making a single enemy at all as a presidential candidate. Not even “enemy”, it’s like he dreaded saying anything that might make someone consider supporting a different candidate. The irony of doing that is that you end up with no one supporting you.

There is a great political lesson there.

Buddahpundit on September 24, 2015 at 10:17 PM

Walker would have been better off hiring a few drunken sailors on leave to run his campaign; he was paying for a personal photographer?

Redstone on September 24, 2015 at 10:23 PM

On the other hand, Noah Rothman of Commentary disagreed, saying that Walker’s serial flubbing on the issues is more to blame.

“At a certain point, it’s not them; it’s you,” he wrote.

Let’s see them do the same analysis on O’Malley.

The field is too big and Trump is sucking up all the media coverage. Just like Clinton, Sanders and Biden are sucking up all the D coverage.

Walker … Texas Ranger?

funny there was a lot less post mortem on the Perry candidacy.

PolAgnostic on September 24, 2015 at 10:06 PM

Perry was never viable this cycle, but I am very pissed Walker wasn’t given any exposure.

If you look at the D side and count Biden in and look at the R side, you can probably come up with some kind of formula including debate exposure and number of media stories to calculate projected poll numbers. It probably has less to do with the actual candidates and their positions than the amount of exposure. Given the amount of media coverage Trump gets, and that he got 44% of the second debate focus, he is relatively underperforming. Someone in the media must have the time to do this, but they probably don’t want to admit the truth about how much they are skewing the results by blocking coverage of certain candidates. Just ask the R that completed all the paperwork, that they refuse to even include in the polls. No, I don’t know his name. No one mentions it.

talkingpoints on September 24, 2015 at 10:23 PM

What do you think about Walker, his campaign, and potential future in the party?

Not much. I was hoping for far more from Walker, but clearly he wasn’t ready for the leap to the national stage. He has time on his side.

I’m more concerned with the rest of the candidates, and quite honestly there’s only one man I can see left standing.

Cody1991 on September 24, 2015 at 10:23 PM

Walker was fired by his donors. He was the first casualty in the revamped GOP Inc. strategy to consolidate the field and save Jeb!, now that the splitter strategy has failed.

Rick Perry, on the other hand, took himself out. I think he got tired of being made fool of.

Interesting that there have been no stories about where Perry’s people and money ended up: with Jeb!.

I don’t think Jeb! has any intention of dropping out. I think GOP Inc. will let Rubio and Maxine Headroom have their little moments in the sun, and then we will start seeing critical stories dribble out.

Maxine Headroom has no money and no ground game. Rubio is spending more time talking to donors than to voters.

I still think Florida is the key. Rubio needs to be gone by Florida. Jeb! cannot lose Florida. GOP Inc. cannot afford to let Trump have it, either. It’s a winner take all state.

Joseph K on September 24, 2015 at 10:24 PM

Another yuge factor was Donald Trump. Trumpmentum has swept the GOP field, and the Donald remains the king of the castle at present. Walker was leading in the polls in Iowa, but the combination of not understanding the Republican base–another Mair observation–a lackluster debate performance, and his inability to use the media attention that was thrust upon him when Walker announced led his numbers to sink rapidly. As Tom Bevan wrote on Real Clear Politics, “Donald Trump ate his lunch.” It also doesn’t help that you deal with Trump by trying to out-Trump him, or be in a similar vein as he is on the issues:

I still think that Trump is being given way, way too much credit for the downfall of Walker.

The bottom line is Walker did not have his finger on the pulse of the conservative voters. He did not understand how angry they were at the GOP and he especially did not understand how furious they were over immigration and years of betrayals. Then when he did start trying to move to the right, no one believed him and the donors tugged his leash and made him step back into line anyway.

Ultimately, he needed to decide before the campaign really started which “party” he supported; the GOP or the conservatives.

This lack of understanding of the “moment” led him to make terrible strategic mistakes.

Doomberg on September 24, 2015 at 10:25 PM

Walker has already decided on how he’s going to run in 2020.

Given that he likes to take every side of issues he is planning on running as the pro-union candidate next time out.

Redstone on September 24, 2015 at 10:26 PM

Walker would have been better off hiring a few drunken sailors on leave to run his campaign; he was paying for a personal photographer?

Redstone on September 24, 2015 at 10:23 PM

Are you noticing the subtext to a lot of these stories; that Walker was basically letting his mom wife run his campaign?

Joseph K on September 24, 2015 at 10:27 PM

A pared-down effort focused on staying afloat in Iowa would still cost around $1 million a month because of ongoing costs associated with ballot access, accounting and vendor contracts.

And we wonder why there are no good, honest politicians from backgrounds that can relate to average Americans running for President.

That is ridiculous.

A million a month for a pared down Pre-primary Presidential campaign.

talkingpoints on September 24, 2015 at 10:29 PM

Are you noticing the subtext to a lot of these stories; that Walker was basically letting his mom wife run his campaign?

Joseph K on September 24, 2015 at 10:27 PM

Does he have an older wife?

I vaguely remember hearing something like that or else I made it up.

In this article at least it seems like the wife was correct to bash the morons like this guy Wiley.

Redstone on September 24, 2015 at 10:32 PM

Too bad. Nice man, horrible campaign.

katy the mean old lady on September 24, 2015 at 10:32 PM

1. No spine
2. No personality
3. Poor hiring choices
4. Big spender

Aside from that this story reads like an exercise in name dropping of the usual crew of circle jerking GOPe smartset fluffers. Why in the shit does Noah Rothman ever deserve a mention for his insipid and grammatically horrifying observations?

Sugarbuzz on September 24, 2015 at 10:34 PM

Walker would have been better off hiring a few drunken sailors on leave to run his campaign

Redstone on September 24, 2015 at 10:23 PM

Lol!

And yes, his wife Tonette is 12 years older than him, a month away from being 60 (Oct 19th). Her birthday being the milestone of 60 would have gotten some media attention, so I can’t rule out that in the back of Walker’s mind was a desire to avoid that attention.

anotherJoe on September 24, 2015 at 10:40 PM

I honestly think that Walker felt he needed to be/sound moderate on the campaign trail and would have been a rock-ribbed conservative once he got into office (just like Reagan), but ultimately chose to go hard right (once it was too late) in reaction to Trumpmania.

So, did Trump defeat Walker? Technically, yes, but not intentionally. Walker basically defeated himself by trying to be someone/something he wasn’t, and it cost him badly. The other problem was that Walker had total losers (Trumpspeak) as campaign staff who were apparently so amateurish that they couldn’t tell their client to stop waffling and trying to please every group simultaneously.

I would have been happy to support Walker, but it just didn’t work out in the end. Hope the governor is getting some rest, at least.

Aizen on September 24, 2015 at 10:50 PM

When you live in a place where politics is dominated by the left, like Wisconsin, and some places I have lived, the differences in the Republican Party seem small and petty compared to what you go up against daily with people on the left.

It is difficult to understand how some people are so far from where the left dominates that the little issues make so much difference to them.

People on Hot Air for example, are just so nit picky about every little word any Republican says (With the except of Trump) and it leaves many of us scratching our heads.

That had to contribute to Walker’s failure. The complaints really make no sense when the outcome is what we have endured the last 7 years.

Being from a Blue state Walker knows the stupid stuff the “base” gets all worked up over is nothing in the big picture.

It really is stupid.

I’m talking to you Trump hypocrites who fillet any difference in all but the one who really has nothing in common with Conservative principles at all.

–and is the guy’s name Wiley or Riley? You called him both.

petunia on September 24, 2015 at 10:53 PM

Oh, enough already! The constant bashing of Walker under some phony BS that it is analysis doesnt fool anyone.

Blake on September 24, 2015 at 10:58 PM

…This lack of understanding of the “moment” led him to make terrible strategic mistakes.

Doomberg on September 24, 2015 at 10:25 PM

I think you’re right, but geez, what a bunch of sophomoric mistakes.

Fenris on September 24, 2015 at 10:59 PM

anotherJoe on September 24, 2015 at 10:40 PM

Mickey Kaus said that his speech when he ended his campaign and told everyone else to drop out and band together against Trump had the feel of a hostage video; it was definitely odd.

Redstone on September 24, 2015 at 10:59 PM

He didn’t realize that he needs to put on a dog and pony show to get elected. That’s more on the American electorate than it is on him.

V7_Sport on September 24, 2015 at 10:59 PM

Walker Turns Out To Be Nothing But A Petulant ELITIST LOSER!!!

williamg on September 24, 2015 at 11:01 PM

Does he have an older wife?

I vaguely remember hearing something like that or else I made it up.

In this article at least it seems like the wife was correct to bash the morons like this guy Wiley.

Redstone on September 24, 2015 at 10:32 PM

Yes, and she’s a lib. She and the kids were getting in Walker’s face over gay marriage.

The impression I get is that Wiley was Walker’s guy, basically did as he was told.

The more I read the more impression I get is that Walker had a major case of big head going into the race. Seems to have believed his own press, and that by acting like the front runner would be the front runner.

Joseph K on September 24, 2015 at 11:02 PM

I am reminded of a scene from flight training in…what, ‘Officer and a Gentleman’, maybe? The recruit is about to be dunked upside down in the tank, wherein he has to extricate himself from his harness.
He asks the instructor in a tremulous voice, “Is this just like going down in a jet?”
The trainer gives him a look, and says “Son, this is NOTHING like going down in a jet.”
And then he hits the release.

Think the opposition, or Russia, or China, or Big Labor, or the NYT is going to handle a Republican president gently? Trump’s bombast is just a warmup for the real world, and if the other contenders can’t take it: Then they shouldn’t be there.

Excellent governor.
Unprepared for the National Leagues.
Life is like that.

orangemtl on September 24, 2015 at 11:02 PM

I think you’re right, but geez, what a bunch of sophomoric mistakes.
Fenris on September 24, 2015 at 10:59 PM

And these “experts” I’m sure have already signed on w/ other campaigns.

What a great gig, you literally don’t need to have any ability, no accountability; just spend other people’s money, cut yourself a big check and move on to the next job, win or lose.

Redstone on September 24, 2015 at 11:02 PM

Walker was under-served by his advisors. Plain and simple.

He was one of only three of the GOP candidates who may have been able to talk me into giving him my vote. As it turned out- he couldn’t talk anyone into it.

Ah well, I wish him good luck in his next endeavor.

lynncgb on September 24, 2015 at 11:03 PM

He hired a GOPe staff who had no idea that immigration was a big concern among the base.

Valiant on September 24, 2015 at 11:03 PM

He didn’t realize that he needs to put on a dog and pony show to get elected. That’s more on the American electorate than it is on him.

V7_Sport on September 24, 2015 at 10:59 PM

Blaming the voters for everything, a surefire path to success in democratic politics.

Redstone on September 24, 2015 at 11:06 PM

Joseph K on September 24, 2015 at 11:02 PM

I think he was a big time Charlie in his state and felt like he was already basically the president; I think a lot of these governors seem to think this.

Redstone on September 24, 2015 at 11:09 PM

He didn’t realize that he needs to put on a dog and pony show to get elected. That’s more on the American electorate than it is on him.

V7_Sport on September 24, 2015 at 10:59 PM

Oh, please, spare us the “he was too good and pure for the voters” nonsense.

Walker was a horrible candidate. Inept, weak, waffling, and stumbling. No one entered the race with a bigger stock of good will than Scott Walker, and he blew it.

The single biggest shock of this election season, besides the rise of Trump, is the fact that the Scott Walker who appeared on the national stage in no way, shape, or form resembled the mighty conservative warrior we had heard so much about.

Talk about a missed opportunity.

Joseph K on September 24, 2015 at 11:09 PM

As a presidential candidate – Walker was a complete dud. He failed miserably, and lost a lot of credibility in a very short time. And now, he has launched an effort to take down Trump and (apparently) pump up GOPe losers like Rubio and Jeb – very sad – Walker is a lost cause.

Pork-Chop on September 24, 2015 at 11:16 PM

Two words: Brad Dayspring

Fortyback on September 24, 2015 at 11:17 PM

I figured Walker didn’t know what he was doing when he hired Jazz’s galpal Liz Mair. When his PAC hired Brad Daystream, it was the kiss of death.

bw222 on September 24, 2015 at 11:41 PM

All I know is that I tweeted to Gov. Walker that his squishy stance on Common Core(I mean, giving the leftist administrators in schools the choice of whether to use Common Core or not… come on! What do you think they are going to choose?!) was the one big reason why I could not support him fully for President. And then I unfollowed him.
A couple days later, I learned he was packing up and going home.

So yes, I may have single-handedly caused Scott Walker to give up trying to be President. Who should I tweet to next? ;-)

Sterling Holobyte on September 24, 2015 at 11:43 PM

“Nuclear winter descends upon Scott Walker supporters”

You mean he had more than one?! He was polling at an asterick * 0.5% I doubt there are that many supporters to feel sorry for. In fact I think most Walker fans had already migrated to Trump. People liked that Walker stood up for himself & fought the unions. Trump stands up and fights, too.

Aslans Girl on September 24, 2015 at 11:44 PM

So is this the corollary to Godwin’s Law where thetimer starts until the “Kardashian” name is invoked in comparison instead of Adolf’s?

dissent555 on September 24, 2015 at 11:53 PM

He didn’t realize that he needs to put on a dog and pony show to get elected. That’s more on the American electorate than it is on him.

V7_Sport on September 24, 2015 at 10:59 PM

Attacking and rejecting its voters like this is like the #1 problem right now with the GOP.

It has nothing to do with a “dog and pony show” and everything to do with nobody really believing Walker was telling the truth about anything (which in fact turned out to be true).

Doomberg on September 24, 2015 at 11:55 PM

How much was Wiley’s salary?

I don’t see that mentioned and it should be at the head of a paragraph all by itself.

I could tell that Walker wasn’t comfortable with his campaign. He wasn’t being allowed to be himself for one. With few or none of the staff people he was used to and trusted, I can understand now how he felt.

Why is it when a campaign fails that the manager isn’t immediately blamed. It’s there deal and they’re the ones responsible but they always seem to slide into the weeds and no one goes after them and makes them own their failure.

Too many so called “experts” out there who don’t know what they’re doing or have failed in the past and no way to really vet them because they hide they’re failures quite well.

jake1246 on September 25, 2015 at 12:18 AM

I’m talking to you Trump hypocrites who fillet any difference in all but the one who really has nothing in common with Conservative principles at all.

petunia on September 24, 2015 at 10:53 PM

Yes, borders and national sovereignty are just pet peeves that mean nothing.

Realize that all your precious “Conservative principles” will be outvoted in almost every election once we become a “majority minority” country!

What I said may be called “hate” but it is also “true!” Please pay attention to truth!

Thresher on September 25, 2015 at 12:32 AM

hmmm. my comments aren’t showing up.

Asok Asus on September 25, 2015 at 12:33 AM

“We built the machine that we needed to get a governor in just phenomenal shape to take a stage in a presidential debate,” Wiley said. “I think sometimes it’s lost on people the largeness of the job. I think people just look at it and say, ‘Wow! Yeah, you know, it’s like he’s a governor and he was in a recall’ and blah, blah, blah — he’s ready.

“It’s just not like that. It is really, really difficult. … I’m just saying, you know, like it’s a f—ing b!tch, man. It really is.” ”

Uh, ok.

Whereas, on the other hand, Donald Trump just goes on a few late night shows and holds a few rallies a few hours before he finally shows up on the debate stage, and he’s ready to rumble. Just like that. No fuss, no muss.

So, yeah, I think I see Walker’s problem: he’s simply a puppet of his “handlers”, but apparently not a very adept puppet since it’s such a “really, really difficult job like it’s a f-ing b!tch” to fluff the Walker puppet sufficiently to get him ready to go on the national debate stage. After all, Walker is JUST a Governor. (Jeez, the dysfunctionalness of the campaign operation putatively headed by Walker appears to be mind-boggling.)

Asok Asus on September 25, 2015 at 12:34 AM

ok,i see the problem. i’m not allowed to use the word b!tch even though it’s used in the article. gotta love it.

Asok Asus on September 25, 2015 at 12:35 AM

IF we end up with jebbyclown as the nominee, we very well may end up with a president sanders.

((shudder))

Andy__B on September 25, 2015 at 12:35 AM

Told you guys a while ago that things were going south when he demoted his WI advisers/staff to his Super PAC and brought in Wiley. Immediately, Walker floundered and made his missteps.

By the end, he was bringing in zero money from WI. Fundraising had dried up to nothing.

And he would have been better served if his wife was in charge than Wiley.

warriorgreg on September 25, 2015 at 12:36 AM

One of Walker’s consistent weak spots in his WI tenure is that he has some awful hires. Liz Mair was one of those.

warriorgreg on September 25, 2015 at 12:38 AM

Walker was leading in the polls in Iowa, but the combination of not understanding the Republican base–another Mair observation

Too rich for words.

FadeToBolivia on September 25, 2015 at 12:50 AM

Sigh.

I really don’t have the time to correct all the errors here, and it’s becoming more of an annoyance to look at all.

“just a county executive” for Milwaukee County, the #29 Combined Statistical Area in the country, ain’t beans, and is nearly as populous as Arkansas. Walker’s problem wasn’t his executive experience, it was a lack of national experience and mainly the fact that 90% or more of the media coverage went to Trump, leaving the field to divide the rest – which usually meant asking them a Trump question.

~

The media is blacking out most coverage for other candidates, force-feeding us Trump because they know he is the one who can be beaten by any Democrat.

And our side’s pundits are cooperating with it. If Trump can sneak into March with all the winner-take-all states, his minority of disgruntled losers, gullible rubes, and white supremacists could well carry him to the nomination, and cost us seats in Congress and state races as well. Which seems to have been the plan.

Adjoran on September 25, 2015 at 1:16 AM

Walker’s problem wasn’t his executive experience, it was a lack of national experience and mainly the fact that 90% or more of the media coverage went to Trump, leaving the field to divide the rest – which usually meant asking them a Trump question.

That about sums it up. Once Trump and his phoney-baloney “Build-A-Wall courtesy of Mexico” promises took center stage by storm, Walker either had to outdo a billionaire troll (fat chance of that!) or hope the right figured out that he was leading them around like a jacka$$ chasing a carrot. And when it became clear that wasn’t going to happen, coupled with some disastrous financial moves for his campaign, it was time to close up shop.

It’s a bitter blow and it couldn’t come at a worse time for our nation but the man had less chance than Rand Paul – and when you’ve hit THAT point you really are out of the fight.

LawfulGood on September 25, 2015 at 3:52 AM

Walker was timid, bland, and had nothing to say to voters on issues that mattered to them.

Stoic Patriot on September 25, 2015 at 5:14 AM

Walker was under-served by his advisors. Plain and simple.

lynncgb on September 24, 2015 at 11:03 PM

Anybody who allows himself to be defeated by his advisors isn’t qualified to be President of the United States. Plain and simple.

Younggod on September 25, 2015 at 5:34 AM

The number one problem was Trump’s existence.

the number 2 problem was his tendency to try to outtrump Trump

gerrym51 on September 25, 2015 at 7:51 AM

Meh.

Walker didn’t succeed in his first campaign for governor either.

Star Bird on September 25, 2015 at 9:16 AM

I blame conservatives and their irrational desire to see minor issues like illegal invasion and colonization front and center in the national debate, and their disdain of someone who tries to pander to 3 different groups at once.

I also blame Donald Trump for even existing.

So the truth is that voters and other candidates are the reason that Walker failed to gain traction. I mean, how pointless that a bunch of citizens gets to decide who is or is not our President?
/

Dolce Far Niente on September 25, 2015 at 10:01 AM

He just wasn’t ready. I’m hoping he has a bright political future, someday.

Ward Cleaver on September 25, 2015 at 10:34 AM

He hired crummy staff who helped him make bad decisions. “Not ready” is the CW and it’s probably correct.

That said, there really aren’t enough good campaign managers/advisors/staff to go around in a field this size. The candidates may end up with people who don’t even have the GOP’s best interests at heart, let alone their own.

Re: Walker’s wife – Lyn Nofziger, a Reagan veteran, said that no matter what, the candidate’s wife is always going to have a big say, which is as it should be (because she knows the candidate best and she helped get him to where he is). Campaign staff may not like it, but they have to deal with it intelligently or they will harm the candidate and/or their careers.

I’m glad he’s young – he has a chance to improve and try again. Very few Repubs make it through the gauntlet on their first try.

Missy on September 25, 2015 at 12:04 PM