Obama “strongly” urges Senate to get back to D.C. and renew surveillance powers

posted at 10:01 am on May 27, 2015 by Gabriel Malor

President Obama is still pounding the drum for NSA surveillance powers that have been hung up in Congress. Without legislation, key portions of the PATRIOT Act, including the section that NSA argues authorizes cellphone metadata collection, will expire at midnight on Sunday night. Obama wants a partial replacement created by the House to get a vote in the Senate:

“The House of Representatives did its work and came up with what they’ve called the USA Freedom Act, which strikes an appropriate balance; our intelligence communities are confident that they can work with the authorities that are provided in that act; it passed on a bipartisan basis and overwhelmingly. It was then sent to the Senate. The Senate did not act.”

Sen. McConnell is calling the Senate back into session on Sunday, but it does not look like he can actually move legislation in time to prevent a lapse. He would need unanimous consent to proceed, but why would Sen. Paul go along with that? This and drones are Paul’s top 2016 issues, and he has broad support for killing the PATRIOT Act even if there is no replacement for surveillance powers. Here’s Paul:

“Five days,” Paul wrote in a Tuesday message to supporters. “That’s how long you and I have until the U.S. Senate meets in a rare Sunday session on May 31st where surveillance state apologists will do everything they can to RAM through an extension of the so-called ‘PATRIOT Act’s’ ILLEGAL and unconstitutional domestic spying programs.”

“I’m not backing down. I’m not going to compromise. I’m going to stand and fight until the very last moment — regardless of the smears and attacks I face,” Paul wrote in the email.

Oh, by the way, the telephone companies will continue to store and preserve cellphone metadata even if the PATRIOT Act is allowed to expire. It just won’t be immediately turned over to NSA for storage as well. I’m sure it’ll be no problem for NSA to reacquire that information when the House and Senate eventually work out a compromise—perhaps even in the cutely-named USA Freedom Act.

While we’re talking about Paul, he had a fun comment at a book store in New York yesterday: “Snowden and Clapper should be in the same cell, talking about liberty and security.” This has long been a theme for Paul, who insists that Clapper’s misleading testimony to Congress is a worse crime than Snowden’s.


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Comments

McConnell is running to you, Obama. No problem.

Decoski on May 27, 2015 at 10:06 AM

Right after Obamacare, the Patriot Act is arguably the next worst piece of legislation ever produced…

PatriotRider on May 27, 2015 at 10:07 AM

McConnell and Boner are rushing to commit Treason for you, Mr President.

ZERO terrorists caught due to special PATRIOT Act powers. NONE.

This law is not needed for the purpose it allegedly serves.

ConstantineXI on May 27, 2015 at 10:09 AM

Right after Obamacare, the Patriot Act is arguably the next worst piece of legislation ever produced…

PatriotRider on May 27, 2015 at 10:07 AM

Amendment XIX was far worse.

ConstantineXI on May 27, 2015 at 10:09 AM

Thank you, Rand.

We need many more Americans like him, who actually care about our Constitution, to be involved in our government.

KMC1 on May 27, 2015 at 10:12 AM

NSA is a military organization.

It is tasked with defending the Nation from enemies abroad, and in times of war or insurrection, defending from domestic enemies.

Routinely using US military units and assets to violate the Rights of US citizens, or to be used to prevent US citizens from freely exercising their Rights…well, we’ve embarked down a sloppy slippery slimey slope.

Let the Patriot Act die.

Want to spy on civil communications of US citizens to somehow prevent criminal acts? Isn’t this why we have an FBI??

Get the US military out of our homes.

coldwarrior on May 27, 2015 at 10:17 AM

Congress should let all these law expire. They are George Bush laws.
Enough said

weedisgood on May 27, 2015 at 10:20 AM

Obama singing the Blues is music to my ears…

oscarwilde on May 27, 2015 at 10:20 AM

Want to spy on civil communications of US citizens to somehow prevent criminal acts? Isn’t this why we have an FBI??

Get the US military out of our homes.

coldwarrior on May 27, 2015 at 10:17 AM

There is only one way to authorize surveillance and searching of citizens. And it’s called Amendment IV.

It’s the Law Of The Land as libtards are so fond of waving in our faces these days concerning Obamacare.

ConstantineXI on May 27, 2015 at 10:24 AM

Does Obama not have a pen and phone?

locomotivebreath1901 on May 27, 2015 at 10:24 AM

Amendment XIX was far worse.

ConstantineXI on May 27, 2015 at 10:09 AM

You know it was the GOP that pushed it through Congress and a Republican lawmaker in TN who cast the deciding ratification vote. Just sayin….

libfreeordie on May 27, 2015 at 10:25 AM

It amuses me when Paul makes these statements. Given that there isn’t a bit of difference between Paul and Obama when it comes to foreign affairs, this little lover’s spat between the two of them over national security makes for good theater.

Happy Nomad on May 27, 2015 at 10:25 AM

Congress should let all these law expire. They are George Bush laws.
Enough said

weedisgood on May 27, 2015 at 10:20 AM

It’s OK, folks. Little weedie is 4 inches shorter than most men and is just lashing out.

Serious Drivel on May 27, 2015 at 10:26 AM

Obama singing the Blues is music to my ears…

oscarwilde on May 27, 2015 at 10:20 AM

The Patriot Act hasn’t caught a single terrorist or prevented a single attack in 14 years. So clearly it’s not doing what it was supposed to do. So what IS it doing? Allowing The Capital to spy on every American. That is Unconstitutional. George Washington shouldn’t have that kind of power, much less the current dipshit in chief.

ConstantineXI on May 27, 2015 at 10:26 AM

Congress should let all these law expire. They are George Bush laws.
Enough said

weedisgood on May 27, 2015 at 10:20 AM

Some would suggest doing that with Social Security…

That was a Roosevelt Law, enough said….

Have you ever extracted your head out of your Rectum long
enough to apply Responsibilty to the Current President,
and what he wants enacted??

ToddPA on May 27, 2015 at 10:29 AM

Congress should let all these law expire. They are George Bush laws.
Enough said

weedisgood on May 27, 2015 at 10:20 AM

So were TARP and the auto bailouts, yet Obama not only continued them, he took credit for them (while of course passing the blame onto his predecessor).

What’s your point?

Are you so blinded by juvenile personal hatred that you can’t see anything political unless it’s through a partisan lens?

How about Medicare Part D? Can we let that expire since it was a “George Bush law”? How about No Child Left Behind? The many farm/ethanol subsidies? McCain-Feingold?

Oy vey.

Aizen on May 27, 2015 at 10:31 AM

oscarwilde on May 27, 2015 at 10:20 AM

The Patriot Act hasn’t caught a single terrorist or prevented a single attack in 14 years. So clearly it’s not doing what it was supposed to do. So what IS it doing? Allowing The Capital to spy on every American. That is Unconstitutional. George Washington shouldn’t have that kind of power, much less the current dipshit in chief.

ConstantineXI on May 27, 2015 at 10:26 AM

I completely agree, there is no excuse for placing citizens not accused of committing a crime under surveillance and using a supposed court with no judicial review of its decisions as the basis for that surveillance.

Like so many other laws passed by various and sundry congresses, the so called Patriot Act has nullified the 4th and 5th amendments. Gun regulation laws passed by various and sundry congresses have nullified the 2nd amendment, likewise hate crimes laws have nullified the 1st amendment.

America’s number one worst enemy is the Fifth Column Treasonous Media, but it is becoming painfully obvious that America’s number two most dangerous enemy is Mordor on the Potomac (Congress).

oscarwilde on May 27, 2015 at 10:38 AM

Aizen on May 27, 2015 at 10:31 AM

Here is a quiz for you….

How many terrorists have been apprehended because of the “patriot act”?

weedisgood on May 27, 2015 at 10:43 AM

oscarwilde on May 27, 2015 at 10:38 AM

I actually think the WORST Treason of the PATRIOT Act are the secret court orders that can get you arrested for REVEALING that you’ve been searched.

Oh, and OT: The Blonde Spokesidiot has been promoted. World War III now imminent.

ConstantineXI on May 27, 2015 at 10:43 AM

Go Rand Paul go! The people got your back! Even the statist author of this article trashes you, but they cant stop the power of a government for the people that is by the people, so get bent Gabriel and the rest of your statist Nazis!

paulsur on May 27, 2015 at 10:46 AM

You know it was the GOP that pushed it through Congress and a Republican lawmaker in TN who cast the deciding ratification vote. Just sayin….

libfreeordie on May 27, 2015 at 10:25 AM

And a Republican destroyed the Constitution at the cost of 640,000 lives along with instituting a new form of slavery to the State (conscription) as well. Ever notice I’m not a huge fan of the Republian Party?

ConstantineXI on May 27, 2015 at 10:50 AM

Here is a quiz for you….

How many terrorists have been apprehended because of the “patriot act”?

weedisgood on May 27, 2015 at 10:43 AM

You might have missed my posts on this in the past, but I’m opposed to the PATRIOT Act. I think it’s a horrible law that circumvents the Fourth and Fifth Amendments. But I want it gone because it’s a bad law, not simply because it’s a “George Bush law” as you stated.

Aizen on May 27, 2015 at 10:55 AM

You guys have the Act all wrong, they don’t “listen” to any tapes, any conversations, without a warrant, a specific warrant.

What they gather, what they want, is who is contacting whom…they accumulate phone numbers, not conversations. Even Rand admitted that.

Since 9/11, the feds want to know who is calling in from out of the country into the country. No one is giving up any “freedom”, and they could care less about you or me…unless we are receiving an abnormal amount of calls from Iran…

Truthers, of course, will never believe that, but they (and Rand) could not point out a single incident where a conversation was illegally recorded, without a warrant.

And remember this is the Rand who when asked for a subpoena to identify who falsified Senate records regarding healthcare, refused to vote for a subpoena…he doesn’t want criminals to be exposed or caught.

Frankly, he is just as brilliant of a nut case has his father…

right2bright on May 27, 2015 at 10:58 AM

right2bright on May 27, 2015 at 10:58 AM

You clearly have more faith in this government than I do.

ConstantineXI on May 27, 2015 at 11:02 AM

President Obama is still pounding the drum for NSA surveillance powers that have been hung up in Congress.

Bang The Drum All Day – Todd Rundgren

I don’t want to work
I want to bang on the drum all day
Hey, why not?
I don’t want to play
I just want to bang on the drum all day

Pelosi Schmelosi on May 27, 2015 at 11:06 AM

The Patriot Act hasn’t caught a single terrorist or prevented a single attack in 14 years.

ConstantineXI on May 27, 2015 at 10:26 AM

It’s not designed to “catch” terrorists, it intercepts communications from our enemies to their faithful in the U.S.

That’s like saying a forensic examiner has never caught a singer criminal…they are there to provide evidence for the FBI and others to follow up on.

Why is a terrorist group communicating with someone in the U.S.? What is a group in Detroit raising money and wiring it to Iran, or to Paris, than to Iran?

You may not care, or want to know, but the FBI wants to know who is communicating to our enemies…

right2bright on May 27, 2015 at 11:08 AM

You clearly have more faith in this government than I do.

ConstantineXI on May 27, 2015 at 11:02 AM

On this particular subject, I obviously do…this is where good conservatives do have a differing opinion. And that is okay.

I don’t mind them wire tapping overseas phone numbers to find a pattern, to make it more difficult for terrorists to move about and communicate. But then I don’t communicate with people in those parts of the world, and 70% of my communication is with family and the other 30% with business. Pretty mundane stuff.

Their is not enough resources in the U.S. to track “everything and everybody”, so I know, just form the ineptness of the government, they have to keep it focused.

right2bright on May 27, 2015 at 11:13 AM

These clowns are amazing. Reauthorizing these programs is supposedly critical to the security of the nation. Yet where are they today? On vacation.

McConnell could have skipped the vacation entirely. Or he could have called the Senate back into session yesterday. Instead, he’s waiting until Sunday when we will be in full “crisis” mode where “something, anything” has to be done to save our nation.

Oh, and guess what else? President Obama, who is “strongly” encouraging the Senate to reconvene… he actually has the power under Article II, Section 3 to reconvene them on his own. But will he do that, since this is such a dire emergency? No.

The fact that the Senate considers their vacation more important than the PATRIOT Act should tell you everything you need to know about that act’s actual importance to the security of our nation.

Shump on May 27, 2015 at 11:15 AM

It amuses me when Paul makes these statements. Given that there isn’t a bit of difference between Paul and Obama when it comes to foreign affairs, this little lover’s spat between the two of them over national security makes for good theater.

Happy Nomad on May 27, 2015 at 10:25 AM

Sure sounds like it is you, Barack Obama and Lindsey Graham on one side, vs Rand Paul and the opinion of the American people.

But then, I’m sure you are quite comfortable in that little threesome…

JohnGalt23 on May 27, 2015 at 11:18 AM

ConstantineXI on May 27, 2015 at 10:09 AM

Zero stopped that we know of. Like Garland and Boston. They admit they haven’t stopped any.

dogsoldier on May 27, 2015 at 11:19 AM

You may not care, or want to know, but the FBI wants to know who is communicating to our enemies…

right2bright on May 27, 2015 at 11:08 AM

If they want it that freaking bad, let them go and get a warrant…

JohnGalt23 on May 27, 2015 at 11:20 AM

Well done Rand.

cat_owner on May 27, 2015 at 11:26 AM

If they want it that freaking bad, let them go and get a warrant…

JohnGalt23 on May 27, 2015 at 11:20 AM

Exactly. And if they can’t get a warrant, tough shit.

That’s the risk we assume to have Liberty.

Law Enforcement isn’t perfect. And no one would WANT to live in a world where it was.

ConstantineXI on May 27, 2015 at 11:46 AM

I love Rand, but Snowden should be awarded a medal and a position in Rand’s cabinet for his service, and that’s just for starters. One minute in a prison cell is one too many, and an absolute disgrace on any nation that deigns to treat its heroes with such contempt.

thirtyandseven on May 27, 2015 at 11:53 AM

Obama “strongly” urges Senate to get back to D.C. and renew surveillance powers

Not if Rand can help it! There is one man in Washington D.C. standing between the 4th Amendment and a taxpayer-purchased paper shredder.

TBSchemer on May 27, 2015 at 12:08 PM

If they want it that freaking bad, let them go and get a warrant…

JohnGalt23 on May 27, 2015 at 11:20 AM

I could explain why they can’t be done without something like this act, but I doubt you really care about facts.

So this is for the others who are not sure.

They do want it “that bad” that is why they passe this law.

To get a warrant you need a specific name, and reason…now how do you know a terrorists name, and the reason for the call, if you don’t know about the call…get it? They use a different phone every week, so how do you get a warrant?

This isn’t about citizens to citizens, that is not covered by this act (you still need a warrant), it’s about foreigners who are not citizens, have no rights, calling into our country or entering out country and communicating with others.

Once they have that information, if it is valid (they have reason), than they go to the judge and get a warrant to obtain more information, where they can record the calls, trace them and whatever the FBI does…but they need a warrant to do that.

right2bright on May 27, 2015 at 12:39 PM

You guys have the Act all wrong, they don’t “listen” to any tapes, any conversations, without a warrant, a specific warrant. right2bright on May 27, 2015 at 10:58 AM

NSA collects word-for-word every domestic communication.

Akzed on May 27, 2015 at 12:41 PM

Exactly. And if they can’t get a warrant, tough shit.

That’s the risk we assume to have Liberty.

Law Enforcement isn’t perfect. And no one would WANT to live in a world where it was.

ConstantineXI on May 27, 2015 at 11:46 AM

Yes, but this is against foreign nationals, how do you get a warrant of Mohammed if he is in France?

If it’s a citizen of the U.S., they do need a warrant and “reason”.

This doesn’t infringe our our liberty, it infringes on the liberties of foreigners…and primarily from terrorist countries, I could care less about infringing on their freedoms or liberty.

That’s like saying we shouldn’t ask Mexicans to provide proof of being a citizen without a warrant…b.s., they are not a citizen and they don’t receive the benefit of being a citizen.

right2bright on May 27, 2015 at 12:43 PM

How many terrorists have been apprehended because of the “patriot act”?

weedisgood on May 27, 2015 at 10:43 AM

Why, none. Why don’t we just let the poor thing expire?

Of course, your pResident – the SCOAMF – really wants it renewed…no matter how ineffectual it has been at its intended purpose.

I wonder why he wants it so badly.

Solaratov on May 27, 2015 at 12:51 PM

NSA collects word-for-word every domestic communication.

Akzed on May 27, 2015 at 12:41 PM

Pal, you obviously will believe anything…there is no way they could collect word for word every domestic communication…

Just my kids alone would fill up every computer in the world…

There isn’t enough memory to save that much communication…that is billions of hours a day of communication, and how do you sort through billions of hours, not millions, but billions, every day.

They collect “metadata” not word for word…and the key metadata are tied to a terrorist list.

right2bright on May 27, 2015 at 12:51 PM

Pal, you obviously will believe anything…there is no way they could collect word for word every domestic communication…
right2bright on May 27, 2015 at 12:51 PM

Well that’s certainly a logical argument.

“I just saw the inputs were including hundreds of millions of records of phone calls of U.S. citizens every day. So it was virtually — there wasn’t anybody who wasn’t a part of this collection of information.” –Bill Binney, NSA Whistleblower, but what’s he know compared to you?

Akzed on May 27, 2015 at 12:59 PM

To get a warrant you need a specific name, and reason…now how do you know a terrorists name, and the reason for the call, if you don’t know about the call…get it? They use a different phone every week, so how do you get a warrant?

How do we know that criminals are criminals if you don’t have police officers stationed in their homes to catch their crimes?

TBSchemer on May 27, 2015 at 1:00 PM

They collect “metadata” not word for word…and the key metadata are tied to a terrorist list.

right2bright on May 27, 2015 at 12:51 PM

20% of Americans get wrapped up in that list. That’s 60 million people. Those are certainly not all terrorists, or even related to any sort of terrorist activity.

Metadata is a dangerous thing. You can’t honestly argue that it’s simultaneously harmless and effective at catching terrorists.
If the 18th century British government had access to the same sort of metadata, this is what they could’ve done:
http://kieranhealy.org/blog/archives/2013/06/09/using-metadata-to-find-paul-revere/

TBSchemer on May 27, 2015 at 1:03 PM

This doesn’t infringe our our liberty, it infringes on the liberties of foreigners…and primarily from terrorist countries, I could care less about infringing on their freedoms or liberty.

That’s like saying we shouldn’t ask Mexicans to provide proof of being a citizen without a warrant…b.s., they are not a citizen and they don’t receive the benefit of being a citizen.

right2bright on May 27, 2015 at 12:43 PM

I would have no problems with the PATRIOT Act if it included one clause: “Does not apply to American Citizens”

But it doesn’t. Hence all the spying on Americans revealed by Snowden. They could use this to spy on mosques where domestic terrorists organize but that wouldn’t be politically correct would it?

So the one place where this could do some good domestically they REFUSE to use it. So the whole damn thing should be scrapped.

ConstantineXI on May 27, 2015 at 1:10 PM

“I just saw the inputs were including hundreds of millions of records of phone calls of U.S. citizens every day. So it was virtually — there wasn’t anybody who wasn’t a part of this collection of information.” -Bill Binney, NSA Whistleblower, but what’s he know compared to you?

Akzed on May 27, 2015 at 12:59 PM

There is a big difference, a huge difference between “word-for-word” and metadata…
Where did he say “word for word”, he said “records”, well yeah, we know those are kept because any crime committed they can review that data.

So I guess you just didn’t read it so well, it was more important getting your snarky comment in, than to actually understand what he was stating.

right2bright on May 27, 2015 at 1:29 PM

Reagan did not re-invade Vietnam. He fought the Communists economically, peacefully.

Reagan did not invade Iran to end the hostage crisis. He convinced them it was in their best interests to avoid conflict.

Reagan did not try to invade and overthrow countries in the Soviet sphere of influence. He led our country by example so that others would willingly follow.

Reagan supported a strong defense, not imperialistic ambitions.

Reagan supported firm negotiations and aid of allies, not brinksmanship and military interventionism.

Reagan supported SDI and economic growth to compete against our enemies, not perpetual war.

Ronald Reagan’s foreign policy had everything in common with Rand Paul’s, and NOTHING in common with Bush’s, McCain’s, Christie’s, Walker’s, or Rubio’s.

TBSchemer on May 27, 2015 at 1:31 PM

Dang it, wrong thread.

TBSchemer on May 27, 2015 at 1:31 PM

I would have no problems with the PATRIOT Act if it included one clause: “Does not apply to American Citizens”

But it doesn’t. Hence all the spying on Americans revealed by Snowden. They could use this to spy on mosques where domestic terrorists organize but that wouldn’t be politically correct would it?

So the one place where this could do some good domestically they REFUSE to use it. So the whole damn thing should be scrapped.

ConstantineXI on May 27, 2015 at 1:10 PM

I get it, but it does apply to “American Citizens” if they are receiving the phone calls…or they are calling the foreigners phone.

But the details cannot be obtained from a citizen without a warrant…just the metadata, which show where and to whom the calls were made, not any transcriptions or recordings.

And they do and have on the Mosques…and don’t rely too much on Snowden. If he has data to back up what he says, great, but at his word? I wouldn’t give him that much credence.

right2bright on May 27, 2015 at 1:33 PM

There is a big difference, a huge difference between “word-for-word” and metadata…
Where did he say “word for word”, he said “records”, well yeah, we know those are kept because any crime committed they can review that data.

So I guess you just didn’t read it so well, it was more important getting your snarky comment in, than to actually understand what he was stating.

right2bright on May 27, 2015 at 1:29 PM

“I just saw the inputs were including hundreds of millions of records of phone calls of U.S. citizens every day. So it was virtually — there wasn’t anybody who wasn’t a part of this collection of information.” –Russell Tice, same article, different whistleblower

Akzed on May 27, 2015 at 1:58 PM

You want the NSA surveillance powers back?

Deliver Louis Lerner’s and Hillary’s emails and communications thereby proving the NSA’s usefulness and then we will be happy to renew the NSA programs.

RJL on May 27, 2015 at 3:04 PM

“I just saw the inputs were including hundreds of millions of records of phone calls of U.S. citizens every day. So it was virtually — there wasn’t anybody who wasn’t a part of this collection of information.” -Russell Tice, same article, different whistleblower

Akzed on May 27, 2015 at 1:58 PM

Okay, I will try one more time…I was responding to the post that said every communication “word-for-word” was collected. And I said that was BS, nothing could hold that much data.

And you keep quoting people saying they are collecting data of every citizen. That is metadata, completely different, there are no “transcripts”…

Now do you understand…I was responding to “word-for-word”…I know they collect data, every crime they can pull that information of who called whom…I already stated that. I get that information on my phone bill every month, and can pull up the past year and look at every phone message and the number of minutes. But they don’t have my phone call recorded, that takes a warrant.

Sheeeshhh…do you understand now?

right2bright on May 27, 2015 at 3:23 PM

Ronald Reagan’s foreign policy had everything in common with Rand Paul’s, and NOTHING in common with Bush’s, McCain’s, Christie’s, Walker’s, or Rubio’s.

TBSchemer on May 27, 2015 at 1:31 PM

Until that last paragraph you were correct…Reagan believed in a strong military, and a strong commitment to use the military to make a stand…hence the attack on Kadifi’s compound, Rand would never do that.
And Rand changed his position on military spending just recently when he decided to run.

Reagan also believed in a strong military presence overseas…although Reagan spent less than any other president on conflicts, his spending and belief in a strong military abroad, along with making sure our allies were well equipped, and the absolute resolution that he would use it in support, is much different from Rand.

Rand’s military policy has nothing to do with Reagan’s except he changed his position to be more “moderate” and not as much anti-military.

I know you are a supporter of Rand, and that is great, but don’t try to make him out as some Reagan…he is nothing close.

right2bright on May 27, 2015 at 3:32 PM

I was responding to the post that said every communication “word-for-word” was collected. And I said that was BS, nothing could hold that much data…. Sheeeshhh…do you understand now? right2bright on May 27, 2015 at 3:23 PM

RUSSELL TICE: Well, two months ago, I contacted some colleagues at NSA. We had a little meeting, and the question came up, was NSA collecting everything now? Because we kind of figured that was the goal all along. And the answer came back. It was, yes, they are collecting everything, contents word for word, everything of every domestic communication in this country.

Akzed on May 27, 2015 at 3:45 PM

I said that was BS, nothing could hold that much data…. Sheeeshhh…do you understand now? right2bright on May 27, 2015 at 3:23 PM

Utah Data Center –

An article by Forbes estimates the storage capacity as between 3 and 12 exabytes in the near term, based on analysis of unclassified blueprints…

5 Exabytes: All words ever spoken by human beings.

Akzed on May 27, 2015 at 4:03 PM

If ISIS is only a few bad members, who only get upset because of lack of jobs and cartoons, then why do we need the surveillance? This needs to be asked to the President. He also insists Iran is peaceful and we are making huge strides in the war. So, force him to say what he refuses to say. Otherwise, it’s just another weapon against conservative Americans who question the liberal ideology. His other weapons include the IRS, DOJ, the MSM.

djaymick on May 27, 2015 at 4:41 PM

right2bright on May 27, 2015 at 12:39 PM

Did you ever stop to consider why the founding fathers put those protections in place? They lived it under the redcoats, they know what all they did to subvert the British. Yet when they got their own country and started writing the rules, they put in all the protections that could have protected them but ostensibly would now protect future enemies of the state. Now why would they do that? Because they saw government as a greater evil than a bunch of rebels. As in if some people are reveling, maybe they have a point.

That said, the Constitution is not a suicide pact and when dealing on a war footing, POTUS has the responsibility to decide what to protect and what to keep.

This war on terror is a convenient tool to keep the boot on we the people. No, it has to be a clear case of war, else shove the Patriot act where the sun don’t shine. Make the case, bring the evidence or shut up.

I’m willing to roll all of this nonsense back to 1960 in exchange for more liberty. If the terrorists think this provides opportunity, they’ll find out how dead wrong they are.

AH_C on May 27, 2015 at 8:44 PM

You want the NSA surveillance powers back?

Deliver Louis Lerner’s and Hillary’s emails and communications thereby proving the NSA’s usefulness and then we will be happy to renew the NSA programs.

RJL on May 27, 2015 at 3:04 PM

This a 100 times.

AH_C on May 27, 2015 at 8:48 PM

Amendment XIX was far worse.

ConstantineXI on May 27, 2015 at 10:09 AM

I sense that whole war on women thing is coming back for another reprise…

Tlaloc on May 28, 2015 at 11:39 AM

It’s not designed to “catch” terrorists, it intercepts communications from our enemies to their faithful in the U.S.

That’s like saying a forensic examiner has never caught a singer criminal…they are there to provide evidence for the FBI and others to follow up on.

right2bright on May 27, 2015 at 11:08 AM

Sorry, no. I’m pretty sure anyone here (except you) would say that if a forensic examiner provided the key evidence used to put a criminal away then that examiner “caught” the criminal, despite not being physically responsible for apprehending them. Same with the NSA. If the NSA is the one that tells the FBI about a plot then the NSA would get the win.

But they haven’t gotten any wins using the PATRIOT Act.

Tlaloc on May 28, 2015 at 11:46 AM

Okay, I will try one more time…I was responding to the post that said every communication “word-for-word” was collected. And I said that was BS, nothing could hold that much data.

right2bright on May 27, 2015 at 3:23 PM

You are so wrong here it isn’t even going to be fun to mock you.

Tlaloc on May 28, 2015 at 11:49 AM