The ad is good, but what’s better is the reaction from the national Democratic Senatorial committee about the ad. This is not the behavior of a winning team.

First, the ad. It’s a good ad, tapping into the idea that Sen. Mark Udall has been a creature of Washington for far too long, and that he comes from a family whose aspirations and careers live there, too. Unlike Gardner, who touts his tractor-building Coloradan past and family. It uses Gardner’s engaging truly nice-guy charm to score a point on his opponent while keeping it positively sunshiney on the political ad scale. Stipulated that the “nice guy” has a hint of a “bless your heart” feel, but this is not an outrage-inspiring ad.

The DSCC disagrees, and their reaction to it is so very out of sync with the content of the ad that it really. Here’s the statement:

“It’s clear Congressman Cory Gardner’s campaign is struggling to overcome the damage done by his support for laws that could block a woman’s access to common forms of birth control, take away women’s personal health care decisions even in cases of rape or incest, and roll women’s health care rights back decades. It’s disgusting that Congressman Gardner would stoop as low as attacking Senator Mark Udall’s late father and it is beneath a candidate running for the U.S. Senate. Congressman Gardner should apologize to Senator Udall and his family and pull the ad off the air.”

An “attack” on Udall’s father, you see. Mentioning a rather standard point in his biography is a “disgusting” “attack” “beneath a candidate running for the U.S. Senate” that should be pulled off the air. This ad.

Uh huh:

Susan Davis, a reporter with USA Today, seems a tad confused, along with the rest of us:

Hate speech is anything uttered by a Republican, don’tcha know? And, now career politicians are apparently a protected class:

Read the whole Twitchy feed on this freak-out, here.