Here’s another piece of great news about the security of the US, after this morning’s exposure of the resumé of home-grown jihadi Abdirahmaan Muhumed as an airport worker at the Minneapolis-St. Paul Airport. Last night, Jake Tapper interviewed former CIA agent Bob Baer, who soothed the nation about the threat of infiltration by ISIS into the US. Well, not so much soothed as shrugging his shoulders and saying that it’s almost certainly happened already:

The terrorist group has gained strongholds in eastern Syria and northeastern Iraq, and, according to a former CIA operative, ISIS cells have already infiltrated the U.S.

“The people who collect tactical intelligence on the ground, day-to-day – and this isn’t Washington – but people collecting this stuff say they’re here, ISIS is here, they’re capable of striking,” said CNN national security analyst and former CIA operative Bob Baer.

“They don’t know what their plans and intentions are. But it’s a definite concern,” said Baer.

Last week, we noted a Fox News report that ISIS had plans to infiltrate across the southern border, but we’re not their only target, either. Indonesia has gone on alert in Bali, according to media there, worried about the potential for ISIS to establish “certain pockets” for its organization in the country:

The Karangasem district government in Bali is working with all organisations and religious institutions to anticipate possible infiltration of the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS)’s ideology, Indonesia’s Antara news agency reported.

Government spokesman I. Putu Arawa on Tuesday called on the public sector in the district to jointly counter the ISIS movement in Indonesia particularly in Karangasem district. …

He warned ISIS has the potential to develop its base in certain pockets in Indonesia, and urged community organisations, scholars and religious leaders to prevent the spread of its ideology in the country.

Bali has been the target of two major, successful terrorist attacks, where Western tourists make for easy targets. Closer to home, Kurds also worry that ISIS will infiltrate as a way to weaken their defenses against the frontal assaults of the terrorist army:

[T]he Kurdish region was dealt another blow this weekend by a rare string of explosions inside its territory, including a car bomb in the regional capital, Erbil.

Isis, which claimed the attacks, has shown that even if it cannot hold Kurdish territory, it will try its best to destabilise it. The question preoccupying locals is who might be helping from the inside. …

But it is not just Arabs who could be Isis sympathisers. Iraqi Kurds have their own homegrown militants. Areas along the Iranian-Iraqi border hosted jihadi groups in the 1990s. Their presence was crushed during the 2003 US invasion.

ISIS is a cancer that is metastasizing. Containment and management will not work for long, especially with Western patience and commitment in notoriously short supply over the last couple of decades and especially now. Unless the global community makes the effort to eradicate it, we will see it grow and present a clear and imminent danger to national and international security.