Infographic of the day: Canada explains Russia and Not Russia to Putin

posted at 8:51 pm on August 27, 2014 by Mary Katharine Ham

Perhaps all this Burger King stuff has put a spring in the step of our neighbor to the North. The Canada NATO delegation’s official Twitter account offered this for Putin’s Russia today upon recent reports that Russian troops have “accidentally” crossed into Ukraine— an act dubbed an “escalation,” by even Susan Rice.

Take it away, Canada:

Sure, hashtag activism and snarky tweets on their own don’t solve big geopolitical problems caused by nostalgic former KGB agents, but NATO is also deploying troops to some Easter European bases in response to Russia’s moves, so a cheeky display on social media is not all that’s going on. And, I’m not sure we should let troop movements or lack thereof inhibit our enjoyment of the trolling of Moscow. Reagan was famously great at culturally attuned mockery of the way of life Communism imposed on its people.

Nato is to deploy its forces at new bases in eastern Europe for the first time, in response to the Ukraine crisis and in an attempt to deter Vladimir Putin from causing trouble in the former Soviet Baltic republics, according to its secretary general.

Anders Fogh Rasmussen said the organisations’s summit in Cardiff next week would overcome divisions within the alliance and agree to new deployments on Russia’s borders – a move certain to trigger a strong reaction from Moscow.

He also outlined moves to boost Ukraine’s security, “modernise” its armed forces and help the country counter the threat from Russia.

Rasmussen said: “We will adopt what we call a readiness action plan with the aim to be able to act swiftly in this completely new security environment in Europe. We have something already called the Nato response force, whose purpose is to be able to be deployed rapidly if needed. Now it’s our intention to develop what I would call a spearhead within that response force at very, very high readiness.

“In order to be able to provide such rapid reinforcements you also need some reception facilities in host nations. So it will involve the pre-positioning of supplies, of equipment, preparation of infrastructure, bases, headquarters. The bottom line is you will in the future see a more visible Nato presence in the east.”

Ukraine is not part of NATO, and its members are therefore not required to take up arms on its behalf. NATO announced in 2008 it would not offer membership to Georgia and Ukraine, which had sought to accelerate that process—an announcement that pleased Putin and the more pro-Russia parts of the Ukraine public, which is split on the question. Ukraine remains in partnership with NATO and conducts joint exercises.

The NATO plan echoes the plan outlined by a former ambassador to NATO in this Foreign Policy piece, “How NATO could confront the Putin Doctrine:”

The Putin doctrine — the belief that Russia has the right to act to protect Russian-speakers, no matter where they are — puts NATO nations such as Estonia, Latvia, and Poland at risk. Each of these countries has citizens who speak Russian; the Kremlin has suggested it would penetrate those borders if Moscow thought those populations were threatened.

According to Kurt Volker, the U.S. ambassador to NATO from 2008 to 2009, the alliance is now in the middle of a delicate balancing act: It’s trying to show enough force to warn Russia away from NATO members that were part of the old Eastern Bloc, while not appearing openly hostile in a way that would provoke Russia’s territorial ambitions. The last thing NATO wants is a second Cold War.

“The higher we make the line for protecting allies, the worse it is for countries like Moldova and Georgia and Ukraine,” he said. “You’re telling Russians that if you’re not a NATO member, you’re fair game. That’s a dangerous signal.” …

“NATO could reconstitute an ace mobile force, a NATO response force,” he said. “The idea is that you have units that exist not just on paper — that are identified together and exercise together. They could exercise as a multinational force in Eastern Europe. It would be a strong show of multinational solidarity.”

As Noah notes, I may just be looking for the slightest kick from the leg of an already boiled frog, and calling it life. But like it or not, trolling Russia on Twitter is one way to get more of the Western public to pay attention to Ukraine. And, now far many more Americans probably know which country is Ukraine. I know, I’m not being encouraging.

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Never thought I’de live to see the day when the Canadian government has more balls and is more coherent than the US government.

I may just be looking for the slightest kick from the leg of an already boiled frog, and calling it life.

At least we have an answer to what happens with the boiling water and the frog test: Dead frog. Lets try to remember the lesson.

V7_Sport on August 27, 2014 at 9:05 PM


I know, I’m not being encouraging.

No, you’re being completely inane. Yes, it’s a funny tweet, and @JohnKerry’s #needmorehashtag! team could learn from it. But, seriously, if you want humour, follow the Russians on twitter: https://twitter.com/RussianTruth1/status/504091957308948480

casuist on August 27, 2014 at 9:10 PM

And, now far many more

Good grief MKH, how the heck did that slip past your filters?

oscarwilde on August 27, 2014 at 9:16 PM

Russia is the largest country in the world so they can be excused for thinking past conquered territory still belongs to them.

rbj on August 27, 2014 at 9:17 PM

Never thought I’de live to see the day when the Canadian government has more balls and is more coherent than the US government.

I may just be looking for the slightest kick from the leg of an already boiled frog, and calling it life.

At least we have an answer to what happens with the boiling water and the frog test: Dead frog. Lets try to remember the lesson.

V7_Sport on August 27, 2014 at 9:05 PM

As any parent can tell you, it is always easier for kids to be bold when they have the skirts of their mothers they can run to hide behind after things go wrong. Parents don’t have the luxury of being reckless. They have children to protect.

On that note. I think it was a funny map. It’s Ok Canada be bold. America’s skirt is wide and soft to your West and South. Feel free to get feisty once in a while, but not too often.

coolrepublica on August 27, 2014 at 9:26 PM

Reagan was famously great at culturally attuned mockery of the way of life Communism imposed on its people.

He also backed it up by running them broke. I saw the aftermath, in person. The rusting ships with no fuel.

wolly4321 on August 27, 2014 at 9:27 PM

The official start of WW III.

It’s good to know we have the right man for the job as President.

MichaelGabriel on August 27, 2014 at 9:30 PM

Ukraine remains in partnership with NATO and conducts joint exercises.

Wasn’t NATO set up because of the Warsaw Pact? Didn’t Reagan end the Cold War and destroy the Soviet Union? Isn’t the Warsaw Pact defunct and East Germany reunited with West Germany? Isn’t Russia now a democratic, capitalist country? Isn’t Russia’s military dilapidated?

Me thinks we’ve been lied to.

————-

And, now far many more

Good grief MKH, how the heck did that slip past your filters?

oscarwilde on August 27, 2014 at 9:16 PM

And

but NATO is also deploying troops to some Easter European bases

Don’t want to be mean here, but at least the HA staff has an edit function unlike us. LOL

Dr. ZhivBlago on August 27, 2014 at 9:31 PM

And, now far many more

Good grief MKH, how the heck did that slip past your filters?

oscarwilde on August 27, 2014 at 9:16 PM

And

but NATO is also deploying troops to some Easter European bases

Don’t want to be mean here, but at least the HA staff has an edit function unlike us. LOL

Dr. ZhivBlago on August 27, 2014 at 9:31 PM |

New levels of pendantry. Congrats, guys.

Mary Katharine Ham on August 27, 2014 at 9:33 PM

Would Putin’s Doctrine include Brighton Beach and Coney Island? If so I hope I have time to get to Nathan one more time.

xkaydet65 on August 27, 2014 at 9:34 PM


He also backed it up by running them broke. I saw the aftermath, in person. The rusting ships with no fuel.

We’re broke too. Getting broker. We just had a lot more wealth to squander at the outset of this grand experiment in central planning whether by means of polit bureaus or a regulatory-administrative state funded by debt administered by a politically unaccountable Federal Reserve.

casuist on August 27, 2014 at 9:34 PM

the official start of WW III. It’s good to know we have the right man for the job as President. MichaelGabriel on August 27, 2014 at 9:30 PM

Not quite yet. Maybe a winter or two from now when Europe has no energy fuels and are freezing.

wolly4321 on August 27, 2014 at 9:35 PM

Not Russia… I so often think this is not America.

MT on August 27, 2014 at 9:38 PM

The Krauts and the Nips had similar problems.

If it hadn’t been for British Inja, they’d have gotten lost all the way to the Western Hemisphere.

(and almost did anyway…)

formwiz on August 27, 2014 at 9:39 PM

Since Canada has taken on the responsibility of World Geography Teacher, could Canada please explain to Mexico and Central America and Obama and Rubio and the Chamber of Crony Corporatism, aka Fascism, and la Raza, U.S.A. and not U.S.A. I think that would be much more helpful right now.

VorDaj on August 27, 2014 at 9:42 PM

Good thing Clinton spent the proceeds from the Soviet Union’s downfall. Am I the only one who notices that the dems shut down defenses and national interests, then spend the money elsewhere, only to find out they were wrong; however, the money is long gone?

It seems to be a pattern: Jimmy Carter giving up the Panama Canal now held by China, Clinton spending the USSR money on his era of big government (which is over, in case you forgot), and Obama giving up all gains in Iraq and the Middle East for absolutely no reason I can fathom.

If we elect more dems, we can likely become part of England, again, after giving back the gains in Concord.

Wino on August 27, 2014 at 9:44 PM

we’re broke too. Getting broker. We just had a lot more wealth to squander at the outset of this grand experiment in central planning whether by means of polit bureaus or a regulatory-administrative state funded by debt administered by a politically unaccountable Federal Reserve. casuist on August 27, 2014 at 9:34 PM

No argument, here. I agree.

wolly4321 on August 27, 2014 at 9:45 PM

NATO is also deploying troops to some Easter European bases

I don’t know why those blasted Russians had to place their country so close to so many NATO bases. That alone is a blatant provocation.

VorDaj on August 27, 2014 at 9:46 PM

Not quite yet. Maybe a winter or two from now when Europe has no energy fuels and are freezing.

wolly4321 on August 27, 2014 at 9:35 PM

We might not have that long.

USA & UK power shortages

MichaelGabriel on August 27, 2014 at 9:46 PM

Remember in February when everyone was mouth-breathing about “this is just like what the Third Reich did in the late 30′s” and “this will start WW 3″. Hows that been working out? I still haven’t heard a good explanation why we should care what Russia and Ukraine do to each other?

jephthah on August 27, 2014 at 9:48 PM

The official start of WW III.

It’s good to know we have the right man for the job as President.

MichaelGabriel on August 27, 2014 at 9:30 PM

There might not even be enough left for Hillary to get us into WW IV.

VorDaj on August 27, 2014 at 9:48 PM

New levels of pendantry. Congrats, guys.
Mary Katharine Ham on August 27, 2014 at 9:33 PM

You like us! You REALLY like us! :-D

Newtie and the Beauty on August 27, 2014 at 9:49 PM

New levels of pendantry. Congrats, guys.
Mary Katharine Ham on August 27, 2014 at 9:33 PM

My pedantry is fully stocked.

MichaelGabriel on August 27, 2014 at 9:54 PM

The Putin doctrine — the belief that Russia has the right to act to protect Russian-speakers, no matter where they are — puts NATO nations such as Estonia, Latvia, and Poland at risk. Each of these countries has citizens who speak Russian; the Kremlin has suggested it would penetrate those borders if Moscow thought those populations were threatened.

Hmm. Back before even I was born, there was a guy in Europe who had the same attitude toward “ethnic Germans”, and he wasn’t even German himself.

Gee, now what was his name?…

If the Canadians want a meme’ for this, they might gently remind Russia just how much it cost them, in bounty and blood, to stop that would-be successor of Alexander the Great.

clear ether

eon

eon on August 27, 2014 at 9:56 PM

**EXCLUSIVE** First Photo of the Ukrainian Invasion of Russia. Shocking.

casuist on August 27, 2014 at 9:57 PM

remember in February when everyone was mouth-breathing about “this is just like what the Third Reich did in the late 30′s” and “this will start WW 3″. Hows that been working out? I still haven’t heard a good explanation why we should care what Russia and Ukraine do to each other? jephthah on August 27, 2014 at 9:48 PM

What other Countries are okay for expansionism?

You know about all the pipelines running through Ukraine into Europe, right?

You think it might be part of a larger plan?

wolly4321 on August 27, 2014 at 9:57 PM


I don’t know why those blasted Russians had to place their country so close to so many NATO bases. That alone is a blatant provocation.

Wiley freakin’ Russians used cosmic rays to force Victoria Nuland to admit U.S. connivance in Ukraine’s coup, too, the heathens.

casuist on August 27, 2014 at 10:01 PM

The Putin doctrine — the belief that Russia has the right to act to protect Russian-speakers, no matter where they are…

This worries me, as the apartment building I live in is full of Russians. Should I keep an eye out for tanks driving up to the Palm Jumeirah?

Wino on August 27, 2014 at 10:02 PM


You know about all the pipelines running through Ukraine into Europe, right?

So they intend to attack their own revenue generating energy infrastructure when what they lack most is not land but hard currency? Wow. They are so evil.

casuist on August 27, 2014 at 10:05 PM

Not quite yet. Maybe a winter or two from now when Europe has no energy fuels and are freezing.

wolly4321 on August 27, 2014 at 9:35 PM

We might not have that long.

USA & UK power shortages

MichaelGabriel on August 27, 2014 at 9:46 PM

All part of the plan for a non-technological Utopia. It’s the old “Starve the Beast” strategy. The “beast”, in this case, being Western civilization.

Deprive it of energy, it dies.

Tax its people (aka the grotty groundlings) to death, they die.

Utopia spontaneously blossoms from the ruins, and the enlightened get to live like Eloi, forever.

No, I don’t think any of them have ever actually f**king read The Time Machine by H.G. Wells. Anymore than Wells understood the lesson it really teaches, as opposed to the one he was trying to put across.

clear ether

eon

eon on August 27, 2014 at 10:09 PM

they intend to attack their own revenue generating energy infrastructure when what they lack most is not land but hard currency? Wow. They are so evil. casuist on August 27, 2014 at 10:05 PM

Didn’t they just cut deals with China?

So yea,, Putin misses Kiev that bad.

You disagree?

Besides,, stupid Europeans freezing to death will pay top dollar for drips at the spigot when the windmills and solar panels can’t keep up. Thier money won’t be worth anything.

wolly4321 on August 27, 2014 at 10:16 PM

Too funny,..score one for Canada, and I do remember getting
drilled in geography, throughout grades 3 to 7, and tested on
every continent, and countries locations!

Strange tho, I do remember the teacher spending extra time on
Germany, the Rhine/Rhur river systems, and I guess, in retrospect
the teacher,..Mr. Kerr, must of thought, if sh*t hit the fan during
the Cold War, us young-ons, were already intel equipped!!!!

canopfor on August 27, 2014 at 10:24 PM

Maybe we should make a map for Christian missionaries who are close to the Iranian border.

antifederalist on August 27, 2014 at 10:26 PM

New levels of pendantry. Congrats, guys.

Mary Katharine Ham on August 27, 2014 at 9:33 PM

Should be pedantry.

Ban me with the rest of them.

Bishop on August 27, 2014 at 10:28 PM

Hmmm…the US administration is upset for sure because the Canadians beat us to the punch. Obama had a similar idea but it was still in the mandatory 6-month study period before taking action.

abester on August 27, 2014 at 10:30 PM

You control from the Baltic to the Black Sea,, Europe is an Island.

wolly4321 on August 27, 2014 at 10:30 PM

What fits into Russia?

Bertram Cabot Jr. on August 27, 2014 at 10:40 PM

Easter European

Can a Ham have a Killer Rabbit moment?

faraway on August 27, 2014 at 10:51 PM

The whole Western world is run by 12 years olds.

WitchDoctor on August 27, 2014 at 11:09 PM

It’s the baddest thing Canada has ever done.

faraway on August 27, 2014 at 11:17 PM

It’s Ok Canada be bold. America’s skirt is wide and soft to your West and South. Feel free to get feisty once in a while, but not too often.

coolrepublica on August 27, 2014 at 9:26 PM

Please tell me of a time when Canada needed the protection of Americas skirt.

BL@KBIRD on August 27, 2014 at 11:39 PM

Sorry no cigar. Russia started in “Ukraine” (which literally means “borderland.”)

Kievan Rus’ (Old East Slavic Рѹ́сь,Рѹ́сьскаѧ землѧ, Greek Ῥωσία, Latin Rus(s)ia, Ruscia, Ruzzia, Rut(h)enia, Old Norse Garðaríki) was a loose federation of East Slavic tribes in Europe from the late 9th to the mid-13th century, under the reign of the Rurik dynasty. The modern peoples of Belarus, Ukraine, and Russia all claim Kievan Rus’ as their cultural inheritance.

During its existence, Kievan Rus’ was known as the “land of the Rus’” (Old East Slavic: Рѹ́сьскаѧ землѧ, from the ethnonym Рѹ́сь; Greek: Ῥώς; Arabic: الروس ar-Rus), in Greek as Ῥωσία, in Old French as Russie, Rossie, in Latin as Russia (with local German spelling variants Ruscia and Ruzzia), and later also as pseudo-antique Ruthenia.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kievan_Rus

Moron Labe on August 28, 2014 at 12:31 AM

Perhaps all this Burger King stuff has put a spring in the step of our neighbor to the North

Then again it just might be that our neighbor to the north has become acutely aware that its neighbor to the south has reneged on it’s established practice of using its world power status in order to stop the world’s bullies from misbehaving, and is taking matters into its own hands?

Political Correctness has a deadly global effect far more than carbon usage.

Don L on August 28, 2014 at 5:39 AM

Kudos to Canada for telling it like it is.

Wish we could see the same honesty from their neigbors to the south.

Norwegian on August 28, 2014 at 9:56 AM

This is simple logic that even California’s governor Jerry Brown should be able to understand.

TimBuk3 on August 28, 2014 at 10:07 AM

If Russia claims every country which has a population of Russian speakers… can we claim sovereignty in every country that has a population of English speakers, or can the UK?

I’m thinking we may want to rethink our opposition to the Putin doctrine, because we could come out pretty wealthy and powerful.

How many English speakers in Russia anyway? Enough that we could just claim it? Maybe parts of it.

Headline: KGB English language training comes back to bite KGB.

petunia on August 28, 2014 at 10:36 AM

Sorry no cigar. Russia started in “Ukraine” (which literally means “borderland.”)

Kievan Rus’ (Old East Slavic Рѹ́сь,Рѹ́сьскаѧ землѧ, Greek Ῥωσία, Latin Rus(s)ia, Ruscia, Ruzzia, Rut(h)enia, Old Norse Garðaríki) was a loose federation of East Slavic tribes in Europe from the late 9th to the mid-13th century, under the reign of the Rurik dynasty. The modern peoples of Belarus, Ukraine, and Russia all claim Kievan Rus’ as their cultural inheritance.

During its existence, Kievan Rus’ was known as the “land of the Rus’” (Old East Slavic: Рѹ́сьскаѧ землѧ, from the ethnonym Рѹ́сь; Greek: Ῥώς; Arabic: الروس ar-Rus), in Greek as Ῥωσία, in Old French as Russie, Rossie, in Latin as Russia (with local German spelling variants Ruscia and Ruzzia), and later also as pseudo-antique Ruthenia.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kievan_Rus‘

Moron Labe on August 28, 2014 at 12:31 AM

By this logic, Russia owes Mongolian a whole lot of back tribute money.

History moves on. The Vikings no longer rule the seas, the Mongols no longer rule the world… Alexander the Great is dead.

petunia on August 28, 2014 at 10:37 AM

Kudos to Canada for telling it like it is.

Wish we could see the same honesty from their neigbors to the south.

Norwegian on August 28, 2014 at 9:56 AM

I could see signs along the border: Mexico, Not Mexico

petunia on August 28, 2014 at 10:39 AM

New levels of pendantry. Congrats, guys.

Mary Katharine Ham on August 27, 2014 at 9:33 PM

No, MKH, it’s called publishing. (And the word is “pedantry”.)

GWB on August 28, 2014 at 11:03 AM

By this logic, Russia owes Mongolian a whole lot of back tribute money.

History moves on. The Vikings no longer rule the seas, the Mongols no longer rule the world… Alexander the Great is dead.

petunia on August 28, 2014 at 10:37 AM

Actually, by that logic, the Hungarians and Bulgarians own the Ukraine – the Cuman and the Kipchak were there long before the Rus. As those groups were pressed westward by the Mongols, they basically became Hungarians and Bulgarians. (It’s broader than just those borders, but it will do for the sake of argument.)

Oh, and the Hungarians are NATO members, I think. So, now you’ve opened a can of worms. ;)

GWB on August 28, 2014 at 11:15 AM

New levels of pendantry. Congrats, guys.

Mary Katharine Ham on August 27, 2014 at 9:33 PM

Words mean things. One would think that a person being paid to write would care enough about it to not make mistakes, or to at least clean it up after the fact. Share this with Noah, as well. He has at least one mistake/typo per article I read.

cptacek on August 28, 2014 at 3:05 PM

all this Burger King stuff

This is all very upsetting.

AlexB on August 28, 2014 at 7:52 PM

I, for one, would be very happy to cling to Mary Katharine Ham’s skirts like that stray sock that got lost in the laundry, you pendants. I’m not a pendant. I’m a skirt-klingon.

Cudas to you, MKH. (A cuda is the feminine (subject) version of a cudo, right?)

John Hitchcock on August 29, 2014 at 1:00 AM

test

John Hitchcock on August 29, 2014 at 1:01 AM

My comment got caught in the spam filter. My test shows my current vacation spot (Philippines) wasn’t it. Maybe my humorous comment talking about baubles hanging from necklaces, footwear worn inside shoes, laundry mishaps, Captain Kirk’s nemeses, and female draft-causing attire hit some hot buttons.

John Hitchcock on August 29, 2014 at 1:05 AM