Video: The cloistered Carmelite choir

posted at 6:31 pm on August 26, 2014 by Ed Morrissey

Unlike most of these video memes which I find months later, this amazing project just came out last week. How does one assemble a choir of Carmelite singers when these nuns have dedicated themselves to a cloistered life? It takes technical prowess, provided here by the Virtual Musicians Group, to not just videotape nuns from all over the world, but to mesh the recordings as precisely and presented in such a compelling manner as seen here. Even if one isn’t into liturgical music, this rendition of Nada te Turbe will prove evocative, or at the very least intriguing from an engineering point of view:

Elizabeth Scalia provides the translation of the prayer:

The prayer — which is more of a sort of contemplative pulse — is this:

Let nothing disturb you,
Let nothing frighten you,
All things are passing away:
God never changes.
Patience obtains all things
Whoever has God lacks nothing;
God alone suffices.

We certainly need to remember that.

Indeed. The Virtual Musicians Group has another recording of a virtual Carmelite choir, which is plans to release shortly. In the meantime, perhaps with all of the bad news we’re seeing these days, a brief moment of calm might be appreciated.

Breaking on Hot Air

Blowback

Note from Hot Air management: This section is for comments from Hot Air's community of registered readers. Please don't assume that Hot Air management agrees with or otherwise endorses any particular comment just because we let it stand. A reminder: Anyone who fails to comply with our terms of use may lose their posting privilege.

Trackbacks/Pings

Trackback URL

Comments

Thanks for sharing that Ed.

HotAirian on August 26, 2014 at 6:38 PM

Yeah, beautiful. In this mad world that’s only getting more insane by the day, it’s a gentle reminder of what we’re throwing away.

Oh, and, of course, the American is the only one not wearing a habit.

Cleombrotus on August 26, 2014 at 6:39 PM

It would have been cool to get them to sing “Magic Carpet Ride”.

Bishop on August 26, 2014 at 6:41 PM

Reminds me of The Nun’s Story with Audrey Hepburn.

Cleombrotus on August 26, 2014 at 6:41 PM

Hmmmm. The sound recordings for the introductions sound to be of varying levels of quality. Why is that an issue there, but not during the musical piece?

bluegill on August 26, 2014 at 6:43 PM

Let nothing disturb you,
Let nothing frighten you,
All things are passing away:
God never changes.
Patience obtains all things
Whoever has God lacks nothing;
God alone suffices.

We certainly need to remember that.

Something tells me that prayer would be like trying to pound a square peg into a round hole among Christians in the middle east. Something in the spirit of Pope Urban II would be far more fitting.

VorDaj on August 26, 2014 at 6:43 PM

Very cool.

Bitter Clinger on August 26, 2014 at 6:44 PM

It gave me goosebumps. Thanks for sharing!

portlandon on August 26, 2014 at 6:45 PM

There is a reason why it was Charles Martel who was called the Savor of Christendom.

VorDaj on August 26, 2014 at 6:45 PM

That is lovely.
Thank you.

francesca on August 26, 2014 at 6:46 PM

Something similar was done during an Olympics opening ceremony, but it was done live.

bluegill on August 26, 2014 at 6:46 PM

Beautiful.

annoyinglittletwerp on August 26, 2014 at 6:47 PM

Very beautiful. Thanks, Ed.

SailorMark on August 26, 2014 at 6:49 PM

There is a reason why it was Charles Martel who was called the Savor of Christendom.

VorDaj on August 26, 2014 at 6:45 PM

Well, you have to first have morality in order for you to also have moral courage. Secularism doesn’t quite cut it.

Cleombrotus on August 26, 2014 at 6:49 PM

Well, you have to first have morality in order for you to also have moral courage. Secularism doesn’t quite cut it.

Cleombrotus on August 26, 2014 at 6:49 PM

It was the then reigning Catholic Pope who declare Charles Martel to be the Savor of Christendom.

VorDaj on August 26, 2014 at 6:52 PM

Ed – thank you for this. Just when the scourge of the slut-a-thon a.k.a. the VMAs was thrust upon us this week, along comes this group of beautiful women to sweep that trash out of my consciousness.

Ad Majorem Dei Gloriam, indeed!

dpduq on August 26, 2014 at 6:56 PM

It was the then reigning Catholic Pope who declare Charles Martel to be the Savor of Christendom.

VorDaj on August 26, 2014 at 6:52 PM

Yes. Your point?

Cleombrotus on August 26, 2014 at 7:03 PM

I wasn’t sure what to expect before I hit that “play” button. I was pleasantly surprised how good it was.

Every so often I sit at home and meditate to different sacred music pieces, like Miserere Mei Deus for example. It’s an awesome way to relax and reflect on God, life, those friends and family I’ve lost, and my place in this life.

JetBoy on August 26, 2014 at 7:12 PM

Ed,

Many thanks, we have a relative that is a Carmelite nun in the Vatican. A wonderful order of women serving God and their fellow man.

DanvilleMom on August 26, 2014 at 7:28 PM

This would have been so much better a cappella, the Spanish guitar was especially annoying. But the sisters did a grand job – the singing was beautiful.

whatcat on August 26, 2014 at 8:07 PM

Thanks Ed, very calming, if only even for a few moments.

Diluculo on August 26, 2014 at 9:00 PM

Do Foggy Mountain!

Jaibones on August 26, 2014 at 9:07 PM

Thanks, Ed.
Lovely.
Shared.

pambi on August 26, 2014 at 9:21 PM

Ed, you are a Blessing to all of us.

Thank you for this. Much needed.

A Lutheran

Key West Reader on August 26, 2014 at 10:13 PM

The comments above remind me of the theme: “Separating the wheat from the chaff”!

Some get it…..others, not so much. We must add these women to our prayer lists. Without worldly the affectations, temptations and distractions we all face, they are quietly, devoutly and piously praying for us. Thanks be to God!!

crankybutt on August 26, 2014 at 10:44 PM

A nice way to end a very long day.

Lovely. Thanks, Ed.

Ed, you are a Blessing to all of us.

Thank you for this. Much needed.

A Lutheran

Key West Reader on August 26, 2014 at 10:13 PM

Isn’t that the truth! How nice of you to say that. Thanks for reminding us of that truth.

Elisa on August 26, 2014 at 11:18 PM

I wasn’t sure what to expect before I hit that “play” button. I was pleasantly surprised how good it was.

Every so often I sit at home and meditate to different sacred music pieces, like Miserere Mei Deus for example. It’s an awesome way to relax and reflect on God, life, those friends and family I’ve lost, and my place in this life.

JetBoy on August 26, 2014 at 7:12 PM

Miserere Mei Dei ROCKS!!! I assuming you’re referencing the Allegri version. LOVE IT.

miConsevative on August 26, 2014 at 11:30 PM

I wasn’t sure what to expect before I hit that “play” button. I was pleasantly surprised how good it was.

Every so often I sit at home and meditate to different sacred music pieces, like Miserere Mei Deus for example. It’s an awesome way to relax and reflect on God, life, those friends and family I’ve lost, and my place in this life.

JetBoy on August 26, 2014 at 7:12 PM

Miserere Mei Dei ROCKS!!! I assuming you’re referencing the Allegri version. LOVE IT.

miConsevative on August 26, 2014 at 11:30 PM

I couldn’t agree more — I’ve actually performed it three times… an incredible experience.

dpduq on August 27, 2014 at 12:11 AM

Hmmmm. The sound recordings for the introductions sound to be of varying levels of quality. Why is that an issue there, but not during the musical piece?

bluegill on August 26, 2014 at 6:43 PM

They were apparently using Skype (or similar) as a sort of “talkback” system, and that might have been when those introductions were captured. I noticed a Blue Yeti mic in one shot. Perhaps once the introductions were made, the actual recording was done directly to a system on the nuns’ end for sound quality purposes, with the finished vocal track file sent back later. The intros might very well have been done much earlier, when the whole thing was being initially set up. They have a certain “behind the scenes” feel to them.

This is one of those things where, if you ask five engineers how to do it, you’ll get five different answers.

CurtZHP on August 27, 2014 at 8:36 AM