World Jewish Congress president asks, “Who will stand up for the Christians?”

posted at 12:01 pm on August 20, 2014 by Ed Morrissey

Good question. So far the Western nations have been slow to respond to the ethno-religious cleansing of Christians, and not just in Iraq, as World Jewish Congress president Ronald Lauder writes in his essay in today’s New York Times. Other than anodyne calls for tolerance and peace, the Western world of Christendom has had little to say or do about what John Allen called The Global War on Christians in his book of the same name. That bodes ill not just for Christians but for all oppressed minorities, Lauder writes, and calls on Jews to come to the defense of Christians:

The Middle East and parts of central Africa are losing entire Christian communities that have lived in peace for centuries. The terrorist group Boko Haram has kidnapped and killed hundreds of Christians this year — ravaging the predominantly Christian town of Gwoza, in Borno State in northeastern Nigeria, two weeks ago. Half a million Christian Arabs have been driven out of Syriaduring the three-plus years of civil war there. Christians have been persecuted and killed in countries from Lebanon to Sudan.

Historians may look back at this period and wonder if people had lost their bearings. Few reporters have traveled to Iraq to bear witness to the Nazi-like wave of terror that is rolling across that country. The United Nations has been mostly mum. World leaders seem to be consumed with other matters in this strange summer of 2014. There are no flotillas traveling to Syria or Iraq. And the beautiful celebrities and aging rock stars — why doesn’t the slaughter of Christians seem to activate their social antennas? …

The general indifference to ISIS, with its mass executions of Christians and its deadly preoccupation with Israel, isn’t just wrong; it’s obscene.

In a speech before thousands of Christians in Budapest in June, I made a solemn promise that just as I will not be silent in the face of the growing threat of anti-Semitism in Europe and in the Middle East, I will not be indifferent to Christian suffering. Historically, it has almost always been the other way around: Jews have all too often been the persecuted minority. But Israel has been among the first countries to aid Christians in South Sudan. Christians can openly practice their religion in Israel, unlike in much of the Middle East.

This bond between Jews and Christians makes complete sense. We share much more than most religions. We read the same Bible, and share a moral and ethical core. Now, sadly, we share a kind of suffering: Christians are dying because of their beliefs, because they are defenseless and because the world is indifferent to their suffering.

Lauder gives Obama credit for coming to the aid of the Yazidis, but notes that a few airstrikes are not a coherent strategy to defend oppressed minorities. At least it’s something, though, which is more than can be said for most of the rest of the Western nations on this issue.

Thankfully, Lauder isn’t alone in calling for a strategic, unified response. Pope Francis called for the world to act to stop the “unjust aggression” in Iraq against defenseless minority communities, especially but not limited to the Christian communities that go all the way back to St. Thomas the Apostle. That seemingly flies in the face of Christian pacifism, but that has its limits, as I write in my column for The Week:

Has the Vatican abandoned pacifism? Not exactly. While Vox and others hyperbolically suggested that Francis had issued a call for a new crusade, the pontiff hardly asked for a Western campaign of conquest. Francis’ remarks fall within what could be called a tradition of conditional pacifism, one that recognizes the limits of dialogue and negotiation in the prosecution of violent evils such as genocide. Francis seeks the restoration of peace, which on occasions means the use of force for that purpose — and that purpose only.

It may come as a surprise to many that the Catholic Church still adheres to the “just war” doctrine, which applies to the gap left when negotiation and dialogue either fail or have no rational application. The Catechism, which outlines the application of Catholic faith in the world, expressly notes the circumstances in which this occurs, as well as the strictures for operating within Christian morality when it occurs. For armed resistance to have moral legitimacy, it has to meet five conditions set out in paragraph 2243:

1) there is certain, grave, and prolonged violation of fundamental rights; 2) all other means of redress have been exhausted; 3) such resistance will not provoke worse disorders; 4) there is well–founded hope of success; and 5) it is impossible reasonably to foresee any better solution.

Few would doubt that the situation in northern Iraq meets the first condition, and the proclaimed commitment by ISIS to genocidal policies such as murder, rape, and displacement offer no rational options for the second. One shudders to imagine a worse outcome than the present for the Yazidis, the Christians, and the heterodox Muslims facing annihilation or slavery, so the third condition is almost a moot point.

That leaves us with the fourth and fifth conditions for armed resistance (and by extension, armed intervention). One can argue that it’s so impossible to see a reasonable alternative to armed intervention because there isn’t much hope of success even in that direction, but those two points are the most debatable of these conditions. To shrug off any responsibility on the basis of difficulty, however, is to condemn thousands of people in Iraq to slavery — or worse — under the brutal and evil reign of ISIS and their self-proclaimed caliph, Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi.

My column prompted a rejoinder from my colleague at The Week, Damon Linker, who reminded us of his own take on this last March:

Just war theory took shape in the writings of Augustine, Thomas Aquinas, Francisco de Vitoria, Francisco Suárez, and Hugo Grotius — some of the leading thinkers of Christian civilization — and it was championed in the 20th century by two of Christianity’s most celebrated intellectuals and apologists, Reinhold Niebuhr and C.S. Lewis.

But that doesn’t mean that these thinkers were justified in treating Christianity as compatible with war-making — any more than the choice of Christian popes, kings, and aristocrats to fight the Crusades automatically makes those wars of imperialistic conquest consistent with the teachings of Jesus Christ. …

Reason is a powerful tool, one we should respect and rely on as we think through any number of issues. But it’s also almost infinitely plastic. Given the right premises, it can justify nearly anything. Which is why you should never trust it entirely with your life — or the lives of others.

By all means, let’s argue about war and peace, justice and God. And if, after all the arguments have been made, we’re thoroughly convinced of the need to drop bombs and deploy troops, then let’s go to war, with as much restraint and humility as we can muster.

But please, let’s not make fools of ourselves by imagining that in doing so we have Jesus Christ on our side, nodding and smiling at the slaughter.

I don’t imagine any such thing, actually, and I’m equally certain Pope Francis doesn’t either. I don’t suppose Jesus is smiling at the deaths caused by the airstrikes even while they save the lives of innocent and defenseless people of several faiths. I also suspect he’s not smiling at the barbarity of ISIS as it sweeps across the desert of Iraq and Syria. And while I agree that reason is infinitely plastic or very nearly so, there is a rather large moral inequivalence between genocide and slavery, and the use of force to prevent either or both.

Furthermore, I’m not arguing that Jesus would applaud a military intervention anyway. Pacifism is, and should be, the first impulse of the Christian, and the second and third impulse as well. We are called to prayer and to make peace — when peace is possible. What Pope Francis and the Catholic Church in its Catechism argue is that war should be a last resort, and that it should be fought with “as much humility and restraint as possible.” My column points out what Francis meant, and why a fight to stop ISIS fits within the paradigm presented in Catholic teaching.

That’s why the Just War doctrine exists at all — to distinguish between wars of necessity and wars of choice. War is a result of a fallen world, which Christ offered salvation to those who accept it of their own free will. But the fallen world remains, and with it difficult moral choices as to the proper use of power for the good of humanity. Most wars are fought over petty concerns over territory, power, or even ideology, but some of those in the latter category involve such intrinsic evil with which it is impossible to negotiate or allow to continue unabated. Leaving victims to die at the hands of evil sadists and standing on the sidelines while entire populations get erased or sent into slavery is a choice, yes, but it’s not one compatible with Christian teaching either.


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The Jews will…wait, not all of them either.

Schadenfreude on August 20, 2014 at 12:02 PM

Obama certainly won’t, he isn’t one and actively opposes Christianity around the world. We are going to have to trust in God and stand up for OURSELVES.

ConstantineXI on August 20, 2014 at 12:07 PM

It looks to me that Israel is looking for loyal and powerful allies.

I’m with them.

FOWG1 on August 20, 2014 at 12:18 PM

I will stand with the Muslims should the political winds shift in an ugly direction.”

- Barack Obama

faraway on August 20, 2014 at 12:20 PM

Third world Christians have a lot in common with Jews. Nobody supports them until they’re marching into a gas chamber, or to the edge of the mass grave to be shot in the head. If, God forbid, they defend themselves, then they’re “out of control.”

RBMN on August 20, 2014 at 12:21 PM

Crusade 2.0.

Where’s Richard the Lionheart when we need him?

fossten on August 20, 2014 at 12:21 PM

This is the correct kind of ‘ethnic cleansing’ progressives can approve of.

Ricard on August 20, 2014 at 12:22 PM

We can always count on the U.N….

HAHAHAHA!!! I crack myself up…

right2bright on August 20, 2014 at 12:24 PM

Good man. Glad he’s showing support for Christians. I support the Jews in Israel as well.

Bitter Clinger on August 20, 2014 at 12:24 PM

Nobody supports them until they’re marching into a gas chamber, or to the edge of the mass grave to be shot in the head.

RBMN on August 20, 2014 at 12:21 PM

Actually, that didn’t come until they were gassed.

faraway on August 20, 2014 at 12:27 PM

World Jewish Congress president asks, “Who will stand up for the Christians?”

Obama sitting in the back row, slumped down, looking around, not about to raise his hands.

Now if it were some slut demanding free contraception, illegals demanding amnesty, gays demanding their relationships be called marriage, or anything Muslim………. that hand would be up like a shot with the declaration that it is the right thing to do.

But Obama hates Christians. There is no doubt about that and anyone who says different is in denial.

Happy Nomad on August 20, 2014 at 12:27 PM

I just had this dicussion with my two teenagers last weekend. They want to know why the US is still in Afghanistan but doing nothing about the slaughter of Christians in the Middle east and Africa. I had a tough time coming up with an answer, other than we have a President who seems incapable of addressing anything excepts the wars that were underway when he took office.

It is time for Christians and all Americans of faith to start making our leaders listen and do something. Our religios leaderds need to speak up and demand action as Ron Lauder is doing.

rockmom on August 20, 2014 at 12:27 PM

Has John McRage said SHIT about his horrible Fuc*-Up in wanting to support the rebels in Syria who were fighting on the side of ISIS?

Yeah … I know McRage wanted to help “moderate” Rebels … and not ISIS specifically.

What happened to those “moderate” Rebels?

Don’t hear much about them these days!!

HondaV65 on August 20, 2014 at 12:28 PM

At least Amnesty International is helping, right?

faraway on August 20, 2014 at 12:28 PM

rockmom on August 20, 2014 at 12:27 PM

You can’t blame Obama for all this … the American public deserves the blunt of the blame.

Americans supported the war in Iraq to the tune of 80% when we went in. After a couple of years – that number reversed and people were begging to get out.

Obama wouldn’t have been able to pull us out if 80% of Americans had supported staying in. So American deserve a good chunk of the blame and that includes “people of faith” – who’s interest in Iraq wained too.

But now suddenly …

And another thing. I’m not a Christian – but I was over there fighting for HUMANITY – until were “interrupted” when the Kardashian Big Mac Eating American population of couch potatoes got turned off to that war.

It’s not the US’s duty to protect Christians. This country isn’t for that.

Now – if you want to go back in to save the Christians in the name of HUMANITY – I’m all for it.

But I ask the question – why weren’t Christians overwhelmingly supportive of the Iraq war against AQ and IS when they were killing little Muslim children?

This is the problem for me here see. Christians – just like all Americans – wanted out. Now that Christians are being slaughtered – they want us back in.

Resolve that.

HondaV65 on August 20, 2014 at 12:34 PM

Obama deserves no credit. He made a political calculation because
he was getting heat for doing nothing.

Also, the churches in this country are too busy to worry about
Christians and Jews in faraway lands; they are aiding and abetting
the infiltration of our southern border.

Amjean on August 20, 2014 at 12:35 PM

At least Amnesty International is helping, right?

faraway on August 20, 2014 at 12:28 PM

They’ll get right on it once they’ve made sure that it’s a worse thing for rioters to get tear-gassed in Ferguson.

Bitter Clinger on August 20, 2014 at 12:37 PM

A suggestion to Catholics:

Say a rosary today (the Glorious Mysteries) for the family: yours and especially the family of James Foley. Pray for the families in MO.

Pray the Christians of the world. Pray for the Pope.

And this one is going to hurt: pray for President Obama, that God may grant him whatever it takes to deal with the crises in the world today.

You don’t KNOW how difficult that last one was for me. Mortification can be cleansing.

Kraken on August 20, 2014 at 12:37 PM

HondaV65 on August 20, 2014 at 12:28 PM

*crickets* from McLame. BTW a couple of the guys standing with him in the pictures are ISIS members. The US armed those bleeps in Syrai AND Iraq. There was a CBS story a year ago that I posted a link to that stated we were arming tribal groups in Iraq and some of the people getting our weapons might be AQ, but oh well…

No one is going to help the Christians. Hundreds were slaughtered over the weekend while King Putt enjoyed his vacation.

dogsoldier on August 20, 2014 at 12:40 PM

HondaV65 on August 20, 2014 at 12:34 PM

You are right about that. I supported the Iraq War and still support the fact that we went in, and I support going back in and eliminating ISIS. We should never have completely left in the first place. I can’t stand the people like George Will who were all for it until things got sticky and then have the temerity to criticize the decision to go in.

Bitter Clinger on August 20, 2014 at 12:41 PM

What has happened to Christianity?

Oil Can on August 20, 2014 at 12:41 PM

At least Amnesty Amnesia International is helping, right?

faraway on August 20, 2014 at 12:28 PM

No, they’re busy helping Al Sharpton.

RBMN on August 20, 2014 at 12:45 PM

This is off topic … but it needs to get out … so here goes.

I have an interest in this … because even though I’m retired Navy I still work for DoD and I still deploy in support of the GWOT (I’m deployed right now as I write this).

I noticed – that before Foley was beheaded – he made a statement noting that he was about to be killed (I don’t think he mentioned “beheading” just said he was about to be “killed”).

And also in that statement … he disavowed America – and practically disavowed his family and chastised his brother for being in the Air Force.

And I was thinking … if you know you’re about to be beheaded – why would you make a statement like that? I would never make a statement like that. What’s the use in it if you know already that you’re going to be beheaded?

And I believe the answer is this …

I believe his IS captors told him he was about to die – and he had two choices … he could either disavow America and take a bullet to the head … or remain silent and be beheaded.

And he chose the former option – the bullet – and read the statement … and his IS captors reneged on the promise – and beheaded him anyway.

Which would make them dastardly fuc*ing liars also.

I have been watching the raw footage of Iraqi soldier executions by IQ. Iraqi soldiers RUNNING off a truck to jump in a trench to be shot in the head. One guy I saw practically fought another to beat him to a spot in the trench?

Why would they do that … when they KNEW they were about to die.

I think IS told them that any stragglers would be killed in Barbaric fashion – i.e. – beheaded.

So I think people should know – if you’re in the hands of IS and they make a promise of a quick painless death if you do certain things for them … they’re not to be believed.

HondaV65 on August 20, 2014 at 12:46 PM

What has happened to Christianity?

Oil Can on August 20, 2014 at 12:41 PM

Complacency.

Christians can no longer afford to be wishy-washy in their doctrine.

nobar on August 20, 2014 at 12:47 PM

At least it’s something, though, which is more than can be said for most of the rest of the Western nations on this issue.

Second look at Crusades?

Dusty on August 20, 2014 at 12:54 PM

Complacency.

Christians can no longer afford to be wishy-washy in their doctrine.

nobar on August 20, 2014 at 12:47 PM

I note that the Pope has come out and practically endorsed military force against ISIS.

IT WOULD BE A GREAT HELP IF HE WOULD SHOW HIS SUPPORT FOR THE US INVOLVEMENT IN AFGHANISTAN TOO.

We are fighting Islamic radicals there too – and genocidal ones. They have a different name and a different uniform – but they are THE SAME KIND OF ISLAMOFASCISTS.

The Pope needs to pull his head out of the sand … and endorse military force against ALL Islamic radicals.

Especially in Afghanistan – and ESPECIALLY if he wants our help saving Christians in Iraq.

HondaV65 on August 20, 2014 at 12:55 PM

What has happened to Christianity?

Oil Can on August 20, 2014 at 12:41 PM

Leadership or the lack thereof. I has been my experience as a former Catholic Priests through Bishops in this country have been leading the way to the Progressive Eden. The only yelp came when Obamacare caused them some inconvenience. They have made no attempt to live the life of Jesus. That’s why nobody cares to follow them and why they do not have courage anymore.

FOWG1 on August 20, 2014 at 1:12 PM

“I will stand with the Muslims should the political winds shift in an ugly direction.”

- Barack Obama

faraway on August 20, 2014 at 12:20 PM

If President Obama said that directly, then I will be wrong once again. Chuckle. Only reference I have seen relating to your quote is below. How folks interpret the blow quote is up to them.

Actual quote from “The Audacity of Hope” [pg. 261]: Of course, not all my conversations in immigrant communities follow this easy pattern. In the wake of 9/11, my meetings with Arab and Pakistani Americans, for example, have a more urgent quality, for the stories of detentions and FBI questioning and hard stares from neighbors have shaken their sense of security and belonging. They have been reminded that the history of immigration in this country has a dark underbelly; they need specific assurances that their citizenship really means something, that America has learned the right lessons from the Japanese internments during World War II, and that I will stand with them should the political winds shift in an ugly direction.

HonestLib on August 20, 2014 at 1:14 PM

So let me get this straight..
The President of the World Jewish Congress asks ( WHO WILL STAND UP FOR THE CHRISTIANS? )..
Yet we see a Member of ISIS HONOR HIS GOD ‘ allah ” by beheading a Westerner ” Christian “..
We also see Members of Hamas Honoring their GOD ” allah ” by using innocent Women and Children as Human Shields.
We see Followers of ” allah ” Honor their GOD by Beating Women, Stoning Women, Burning Women’s Faces with Acid,,,

I don’t know about you folks,, but, as a Christian,, I stand with the Jews..

As a Christian, I was taught about the End War,, the Armageddon.
It would be a Fight between GOOD and EVIL..

In the Book of Revelations,, It mentions THE BEAST..
Watching the Followers Honor their GOD ” allah “,, I think I’ve got a pretty good Idea about who the BEAST is..

Delta Wild Man on August 20, 2014 at 1:18 PM

You can’t blame Obama for all this … the American public deserves the blunt of the blame.

Perhaps, but the nation must be led by a competent leader and it is not. Had FDR left it to the public we would have never entered WWII. The presidents job is to guide the nation toward a just, moral and necessary outcome. Obama offers no guidance, no leadership and no direction. Therefore, the masses wander aimlessly in the dark. It is indeed Obama who shoulders the responsibility and the blame.

rplat on August 20, 2014 at 1:36 PM

Would Jesus support military action against ISIS? Absolutely. I’m not sure why anyone would question it?
Remember, it’s pretty much standard doctrine (Jehovah’s Witnesses excepted, to be sure) that Jesus is the God of the Old Testament, born into flesh as Jesus Christ.

And the God of the Old Testament had no problems declaring war on some people. Think of the Flood: why was it necessary to slaughter who knows how many people? Why did God command the Jews to eliminate everyone in the promised land?

Because those people were people acting just like ISIS. Molech, Baal worship–it’s what ISIS is doing today! Beheadings, torture, rape; all in the name of the diety. Whether it was Baal back then or Allah today; at some point some people just need to be put down.

Jesus is a God of patience and mercy, but at some point it runs out. Jesus is also a God of Justice. And ISIS deserves punishment….

So why question whether Jesus would support military action? He clearly would.

Vanceone on August 20, 2014 at 1:42 PM

It’s nice to see some non-Christians defend us, but I don’t really expect it. Satan acts as the god of this world (though God is the one who is sovereign), and so the world hates Christ. As result of this, in general it isn’t going to lift a finger to do anything about persecution of Christians.

1 John 5:19 – “We know that we are of God, and that the whole world lies in the power of the evil one.”

In the Book of Revelations,, It mentions THE BEAST..
Watching the Followers Honor their GOD ” allah “,, I think I’ve got a pretty good Idea about who the BEAST is..

Delta Wild Man on August 20, 2014 at 1:18 PM

I don’t know if Islam is the one world religion of the end times, or if the mahdi of muslim eschatology will really be the Antichrist or false prophet, but it certainly makes one wonder, doesn’t it?

Othniel on August 20, 2014 at 1:57 PM

Obama will never act to help Christians, because that would confer upon them the treasured “victim” status which would hinder his anti-christian campaign here. Christians are the left’s biggest enemy. That is why there has been almost total silence in the MSM and our craven political class. Its why you never see videos of these guys atrocities, nor do you see videos of the victims. Out of sight, out of mind.

Iblis on August 20, 2014 at 2:05 PM

On the basis of “love thy neighbor as thyself,” it’s not exactly loving your neighbor when you see her getting raped and murdered by some thug, and you do nothing. If we do nothing, the Rev. Wright’s condemnation was absolutely right, though not for the reasons he gave.

RockinRickOwen on August 20, 2014 at 2:10 PM

What has happened to Christianity?

Many of our religious leaders support the pro-abortion socialists.

And if anyone does anything to stop the slaughter in the Middle East, Francis and others will decry the use of force. And they will trash the economic freedoms which enable any intervening nation to come to the rescue.

shinty on August 20, 2014 at 2:12 PM

Yeah it IS a good question. I wonder if the pope will actually start standing up for Christians instead of just whining about them.

Diluculo on August 20, 2014 at 2:32 PM

Because all the violence that’s committed against Christians today is just like the violence committed by Christians in the past, so that doesn’t give you the higher moral ground.

– Most people with whom I argue, who reject Christianity because of its history of violence, yet are unwilling to judge the violence of today.

Ie: They only care about violence in the world if it’s committed by people they don’t like. Namely: Christians, Jews, and the West. Just ask the UN.

LancerDL on August 20, 2014 at 2:39 PM

Don’t worry, Obama said these sort of people fail all on their own.

Their ideology is bankrupt … People like this ultimately fail. They fail because the future is won by those who build and not destroy.

So we won’t bother trying too hard to stop Genocide of minority groups; we’ll just accept the genocide and wait for ISIL (ISIS) to fail… once they’ve committed genocide.

We can just ignore it, they’ll fail on their own eventually.
Why should we bother?

You’re acting like Genocide of a minority population is a bad thing or something. You don’t have the new liberal rulebook. Genocide is ok, and we shouldn’t try to stop it.

Just condone genocide of minorities and everything is easier.
Right liberals?

gekkobear on August 20, 2014 at 3:03 PM

They remember The Righteous.

They also remember what Himmler and Bormann and Goering wanted to do after the Jews were gone.

It’s all one fight.

formwiz on August 20, 2014 at 3:11 PM

Don’t worry, Obama said these sort of people fail all on their own.

Their ideology is bankrupt … People like this ultimately fail. They fail because the future is won by those who build and not destroy.

So we won’t bother trying too hard to stop Genocide of minority groups; we’ll just accept the genocide and wait for ISIL (ISIS) to fail… once they’ve committed genocide.

We can just ignore it, they’ll fail on their own eventually.
Why should we bother?

You’re acting like Genocide of a minority population is a bad thing or something. You don’t have the new liberal rulebook. Genocide is ok, and we shouldn’t try to stop it.

Just condone genocide of minorities and everything is easier.
Right liberals?

gekkobear on August 20, 2014 at 3:03 PM

And yet the Romans were defeated by Barbarians.

It’s like missing the point of property rights. What point is there to build something if someone’s just going to take away/destroy your work?

Incidentally, does the President think his main job is just to deliver one-liners for all those motivational posters I see on Facebook?

LancerDL on August 20, 2014 at 3:26 PM

And the God of the Old Testament had no problems declaring war on some people. Think of the Flood: why was it necessary to slaughter who knows how many people? Why did God command the Jews to eliminate everyone in the promised land?

Vanceone on August 20, 2014 at 1:42 PM

Agreed. However, the major difference between then and now, is that the wars during the OT were waged according to the will of God. They were theocracies with leaders who followed God and the Law. God spoke to these leaders, and revealed His will to them.

God doesn’t need us to do anything, but he does invite us to work with Him. There are times when God has commanded man to go to war to perform His will. There are other times when war may be justified, but He allows His people to suffer. The reason that the Jews turned on Jesus, was because they expected that the Messiah was going to free them from Roman bondage, the same way Moses freed them from Pharaoh. Obviously, God had other plans.

God may want us to wage war against ISIS. Then again, he may not. Unfortunately, we don’t have a leader who makes decisions according to God’s will.

HarryBackside on August 20, 2014 at 3:50 PM

They fail because the future is won by those who build and not destroy.

No, the future is kinda won by those who are willing to take action and win it.

Midas on August 20, 2014 at 4:17 PM

I use to buy the just war argument, but don’t really anymore. Just war theory demands that we engage other nations in a gentlemanly manor. We didn’t exactly do so against Dresden and Tokyo and thank God we didn’t. I’m sorry, but wars are meant to be won, not dictated by useless articles of conduct

Faramir on August 20, 2014 at 5:45 PM

The general indifference to ISIS, with its mass executions of Christians and its deadly preoccupation with Israel, isn’t just wrong; it’s obscene.

I LOVE that line.

I wish it made a difference.

tree hugging sister on August 20, 2014 at 6:27 PM

This Jew absolutely stands with the Christians!
Evil is EVIL!

annoyinglittletwerp on August 20, 2014 at 8:53 PM

Why would they do that … when they KNEW they were about to die.

I think IS told them that any stragglers would be killed in Barbaric fashion – i.e. – beheaded.

So I think people should know – if you’re in the hands of IS and they make a promise of a quick painless death if you do certain things for them … they’re not to be believed.

HondaV65 on August 20, 2014 at 12:46 PM

Thank you for sharing this valuable perspective, HondaV65!

Stay safe on your deployment!

wren on August 20, 2014 at 11:16 PM