Poll: 82% think it should be illegal to let your nine-year-old play at the park unsupervised

posted at 7:41 pm on August 19, 2014 by Allahpundit

Laudable work here by Reason to collect and publish data showing how unpopular its own sympathies on this issue are. I wish more Internet pubs of every ideological stripe were as forthcoming.

The most recent example of a mom being arrested for child neglect for letting her kids play alone in the park happened just last week in Florida. The kids in that case ranged in age from six to eight; mom claims she was at a food bank at the time and couldn’t get back as quickly as she’d like. Oh well. Apparently Americans, especially Republicans, want government to play nanny here:

As the nation debates whether such parenting choices are acceptable or neglectful, the latest Reason-Rupe national telephone poll finds 82 percent of Americans believe the law should require children 9-years-old and younger to be supervised while playing in public parks. Just 17 percent of Americans think 9-year-olds should be able to play unsupervised at the park…

Democrats and Republicans tend to agree the law should require 6-year-olds and 9-year-olds be supervised at public parks, but Republicans (73%) are 15 points more likely than Democrats (58%) to also want the law to apply to 12 year-olds as well. Strong Republicans diverge from independent-leaning Republicans on this issue. Independent-leaning Republicans are actually as likely as Democrats (4 in 10) to say 12 year olds should be allowed to play in public parks unsupervised, compared to 26 percent of strong Republicans.

Americans who think government should promote traditional values are also more likely to say the law should require supervision of 12 year olds at public parks—69 to 55 percent of those who say government should not promote traditional values.

Americans are more relaxed about letting 12-year-olds play alone unsupervised in the park, but only a bit more. Sixty-three percent support making that illegal. It’s not just Republicans and social conservatives who favor requiring parental supervision either. Black voters, lower-income voters, and voters with less education are also more likely to support laws against unsupervised playing. My hunch is that that’s a function of environment: If you live in a poorer neighborhood, chances are that crime rates are higher and therefore you have more to fear in leaving your kid by himself outside. But Reason says I’m wrong. Apparently, lower-income and less-educated voters aren’t more likely than better-off and better-educated voters to say that unsupervised children are at risk. (However, lower-income and less-educated voters are less likely to believe that the media sensationalizes threats to kids.) Maybe their feelings on this are partly a function of their feelings about government generally. If you receive some form of government assistance, go figure that you trust government enough to give it more of a role in making sure kids aren’t being neglected by mom and dead in public spaces. Although, in that case, how to explain the support for legal restrictions here among otherwise anti-government Republicans?

Slate had an interesting piece a few weeks ago about “the shortening leash” of childhood, replete with a nifty interactive graph tracking changing attitudes about what age kids should be allowed to walk home from school. Their conclusion:

The most noticeable shift in the Slate survey happens between cohorts born in the 1980s and the 1990s, which is consistent with other national surveys. This is because, during the Reagan era, a panic about the dangers of childhood began to take hold. Citizen advocates lamented the perils of playgrounds, and lawsuits forced cities to get rid of what was deemed dangerous equipment. As Paula Fass chronicles in Kidnapped: Child Abduction in America, a few high-profile abduction cases set off a fear of child snatchers lurking on every corner. Ronald Reagan declared National Missing Children’s Day, and milk cartons began featuring missing children’s faces, making every breakfast an opportunity to fear the worst for your children.

Needless to say, the specific fears are overblown. A child is no more likely to be abducted by a stranger today than he was in the 1970s, according to David Finkelhor, director of the Crimes Against Children Research Center. Abductions have increased, but that’s almost entirely due to estranged spouses or parents kidnapping their own children. What has changed over the last 40 years is our sense of community. Mothers work, neighbors talk less, and the divorce rate began to creep upward in the 1970s and has remained at around 45 percent.

The less you feel you can trust your community to collectively supervise your kid when he’s out and about, the more inclined you might be to turn to government to fill part of the vacuum. There are a lot of implications for public policy in that phenomenon, and needless to say, they’re not limited to children.

Actually, this isn’t even the splashiest Reason poll published today. This one, exploring partisan and racial differences on the ol’ “should kids get a trophy for winning at sports or merely for participating?” question, is a sociology/economics seminar in the making.


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And 82% of adults shouldn’t be let out without supervision

halfbaked on August 19, 2014 at 7:43 PM

Sure as hell didn’t poll 73% of any Republicans I know…

Can we get a HA reader’s poll on this? I find this result super hard to believe.

CapnObvious on August 19, 2014 at 7:46 PM

I’m 32, hardly old. And I used to walk home from the school/bus stop when I was 8 (2nd grade) because my parents both had 8-5 jobs and after school care ain’t cheap.

Oh God…I just realized my parents are horrible people.

nextgen_repub on August 19, 2014 at 7:48 PM

82% that believe this?

Here’s the other side of that stat: 82% are incapable of critical thinking, and assume the only options are the ones someone else thinks of.

BobMbx on August 19, 2014 at 7:48 PM

When I was nine I had to walk a 1 1/2 miles to school and back. Who knew I was being abused.

RickB on August 19, 2014 at 7:48 PM

Should it be illegal to make your kids travel from Honduras to the US via drug and human traffickers?

El_Terrible on August 19, 2014 at 7:49 PM

Florida has a lot of nerve prosecuting this lady, a coworker’s daughter gets Aid for Dependent Children. She is a member of the working poor and the state subsidizes daycare for the her children. When her boys turned nine they were no longer eligible because the state says the boys are old enough to stay home alone. Now regardless of how you feel about any of this, how does the state charge this woman while establishing that as an age of responsibility.

Cindy Munford on August 19, 2014 at 7:50 PM

I believe the proper expression here is “you must be shittin’ me”.

This is utterly and completely ridiculous.

My daughter is 8 and I routinely chase her out the door to go play in the local park. There’s an expiration-time on that, though.

When I turned 9 I was, for my birthday, given a shiny Schwinn Sting-Ray, at which point my unsupervised horizons extended to about 3/4 mile from my house and there weren’t any cellphones then. 1970 wasn’t any safer – probably more dangerous – than today, and this was San Francisco – if the safer fringes thereof – vs the suburbs. When I broke the bike – which I did on occasion – I walked it home, and it wasn’t too much later that I was informed that if I couldn’t fix it myself I didn’t get my freedom back, which was far, far more painful.

I *WANT* my daughter to value her mobility as much as I did.

JEM on August 19, 2014 at 7:50 PM

Should it be illegal to make your kids travel from Honduras to the US via drug and human traffickers?

El_Terrible on August 19, 2014 at 7:49 PM

Racist.

BobMbx on August 19, 2014 at 7:50 PM

Can we get a HA reader’s poll on this? I find this result super hard to believe.

CapnObvious on August 19, 2014 at 7:46 PM

Polls are primarily manipulations designed to create so-called “news” and promote Leftist memes.

I honestly wouldn’t be surprised if — in truth — over 50% of Americans actually now do believe this, just as I’m certain that over 50% of Americans would answer the question “Whose responsibility is it to educate your child?” with: “Why, the government’s, of course!”

The end is nigh …

ShainS on August 19, 2014 at 7:51 PM

If this poll is indeed legit then we are in bad shape. Is the park two blocks away or a mile? I don’t like blanket questions. I used to walk almost a half mile to school in the first grade.

arnold ziffel on August 19, 2014 at 7:52 PM

Cindy Munford on August 19, 2014 at 7:50 PM

Racist.

BobMbx on August 19, 2014 at 7:52 PM

This is insane. When I was 6, I was walking to school that was 10 blocks away by myself. When I was 8, I was bike riding everywhere with friends without supervision. And when I was 12, I was riding 3 trains solo in NYC in the early morning to get to school and then not getting home till evening every weekday. Who knew that by my parents teaching me responsibility they were actually abusing me.

I hate these people.

njrob on August 19, 2014 at 7:53 PM

This is a meaningless poll. People are hearing this question as, “would you allow your _ year old to go to the park unsupervised?”

And the answer to that depends on where you live. In some towns, the park is full of kids playing and parents milling around and everyone watches out for everyone elses kids. In other, it’s full of crack heads and prostitutes.

Timin203 on August 19, 2014 at 7:53 PM

Racist.

BobMbx on August 19, 2014 at 7:50 PM

Impossible. Only white people are racist. I’m not white so its not at all possible for me to be a racist. I learned this in a college course I took a long time ago.

El_Terrible on August 19, 2014 at 7:53 PM

When I was 9 I had a CR360 honda dirtbike, two shotguns, a Ruger #1 in 45-70, pistols, and a bad azzed homelite chainsaw with a 24″ bar. Back when they weren’t plastic.

Tonka toys were made of metal, too. They didn’t round off the edges.

And instead of an Ipad, I went out in the yard and found a stick. And dug holes.

Latch key kid? Not quite.

wolly4321 on August 19, 2014 at 7:54 PM

This one, exploring partisan and racial differences on the ol’ “should kids get a trophy for winning at sports or merely for participating?” question, is a sociology/economics seminar in the making.

How about: should you get a paycheck for actually doing work or just for showing up?

Then point to the bureaucrats who are wasting time net surfing, taking taxpayer funded trips, and getting bonuses for not doing anything. Do you think government bureaucrats doing nothing should HAVE A JOB?

ajacksonian on August 19, 2014 at 7:54 PM

Wow.

When I was a kid, used to go to the park by myself. Heck, when we played tackle football (we played touch football in the street), baseball or just played on the equipment, we could have 10-20 kids in the park and maybe a parent or two … or no adults at all. In the summer, during the day, it was typically no adults at all.

According to the crime statistics, it’s safer today than when I was a kid, so it can’t be because of increased risk. Even with higher crime rates, I don’t think I was at risk. Gee, being a kid of a single parent, I would have had a pretty circumscribed life if I could only go out when my mom was around.

But then, I used the city bus, used transfers, to get all about the city. I walked a lot of places too (used the bus money my mom gave me to buy candy, then walked home).

I don’t think my mom was incautious or uncaring … if anything, I used to get annoyed about being overprotected.

Grinch on August 19, 2014 at 7:54 PM

should kids get a trophy for winning at sports or merely for participating?

Medals or ribbons for participating and coming in second. Big old fat huge trophies for the winners, and even bigger ones for making All Stars.

John the Libertarian on August 19, 2014 at 7:54 PM

Garbage. 82% of Americans are ignorant and probably have no clue as to why certain kids never leave home. Hey, guess what? If you baby your child so often and don’t teach him or her the concept of independence, they’ll never be able to make it on their own in the real world.

Quickly losing faith in the American electorate…

Aizen on August 19, 2014 at 7:54 PM

Inexplicable.

BKeyser on August 19, 2014 at 7:56 PM

BobMbx on August 19, 2014 at 7:52 PM

I know, it keeps me up at night.

Cindy Munford on August 19, 2014 at 7:57 PM

How old was Tom Sawyer when he floated down the Mississippi?

I used to build rafts on tbe Susqeuhanna. I was probably 8-9.

wolly4321 on August 19, 2014 at 7:59 PM

And I used to walk home from the school/bus stop when I was 8 (2nd grade) because my parents both had 8-5 jobs and after school care ain’t cheap.
nextgen_repub on August 19, 2014 at 7:48 PM

Our dad worked and so did our Mom (she was a “housewife”) and I was walking a fair distance to and from school at that age. Was no biggee. Okay, so I got homesick my first day of school, heh, but that was about all.

whatcat on August 19, 2014 at 7:59 PM

Did these people ever have a childhood?

unclesmrgol on August 19, 2014 at 7:59 PM

Poll: 82% think it should be illegal to let your nine-year-old play at the park unsupervised

#LibertarianMoment

Stoic Patriot on August 19, 2014 at 8:00 PM

When I was 5 years old and my sisters were 6, 8 & 10, my parents left us alone for a week in rural VA.
I know for a fact the year because they went to the Seattle Worlds Fair, they met in Seattle.
A neighbor was supposed to ‘look in on us’ and did every other day.
I lived on cereal and milk for a week. The oldest sister was supposed to take care of me.

When my parents called, Twice, the 10 YO locked me in the garage with a promise I’d sleep there overnight if I raised a stink so I couldn’t tell my parents.

To this day, my sisters can’t quite understand why I wouldn’t piss on them if they were on fire.

Times change.

Tard on August 19, 2014 at 8:01 PM

Dragging your child through a tear gas-filled, violent Molotov cocktail-throwing mob gets you Mother-of-the-Year, though.

WhirledPeas on August 19, 2014 at 8:01 PM

I’m with the majority of the poll, I guess. It was poor parenting to allow her to do that. Sorry. To get to her mom, the area was wooded, behind a walmart, then into a walmart parking lot, into said McDonalds. You guys ALL know you wouldn’t let your kids do this unattended during your work shift and other arrangements could be made. And IF you allow your nine year old daughter to run around unattended during your workshift, I’m completely effing freaked out as a parent.

Should the mom have been arrested? NO! Should this small kid be wandering around alone? Nope. It’s stupid if not negligent.

Bee on August 19, 2014 at 8:02 PM

How old was Tom Sawyer when he floated down the Mississippi?

I used to build rafts on tbe Susqeuhanna. I was probably 8-9.

wolly4321 on August 19, 2014 at 7:59 PM

Used to have a dream of taking a log raft down the Mississippi until I realized how big the river got! So I settled for homemade rafts down a local creek instead.

whatcat on August 19, 2014 at 8:02 PM

Meanwhile radical islam puts AK’s in cribs so they get used to them…young.

wolly4321 on August 19, 2014 at 8:03 PM

All of this would be based on the child and the location of the park. I couldn’t has answered this poll.

Cindy Munford on August 19, 2014 at 8:03 PM

Dragging your child through a tear gas-filled, violent Molotov cocktail-throwing mob gets you Mother-of-the-Year, though.

WhirledPeas on August 19, 2014 at 8:01 PM

In some Boy Scout Districts, thats required for Eagle.

BobMbx on August 19, 2014 at 8:03 PM

Keep talking about bygone days of glory, parents. Do you do this with your kids? Sincerely. I’m asking working parents here: over summer, what do you do with your children? And why?

Bee on August 19, 2014 at 8:03 PM

I will, further, note that my 8yo girl already has a much better bike than I had until I was 16, and sometime in the next few weeks I’m going to boot her out the door to go to her friend’s house across town.

She knows how to run a stop-sign more or less safely, given the limited traffic on the route there.

In a few months I start taking her back to SF, make her ride the GG bridge. Age 11 she can ride Presidio to Sausalito by herself and I’ll tell her where I’m going to meet her.

JEM on August 19, 2014 at 8:04 PM

I used to walk almost a half mile to school in the first grade.

arnold ziffel on August 19, 2014 at 7:52 PM

“Go outside and play” is now a thing of the past.

unclesmrgol on August 19, 2014 at 8:05 PM

How old was Tom Sawyer when he floated down the Mississippi?

I used to build rafts on tbe Susqeuhanna. I was probably 8-9.

wolly4321 on August 19, 2014 at 7:59 PM

For not including Jim in your reference -> Racist.

BobMbx on August 19, 2014 at 8:05 PM

Bee on August 19, 2014 at 8:02 PM

I agree it’s not the best choice for child care. But a kid’s gotta roam around at that age (9) and they can’t (and shouldn’t) be in parent’s line of sight all the time.

whatcat on August 19, 2014 at 8:06 PM

My friends and I ran free every day from after breakfast until time for dinner. We lived in an ethnically homogeneous working class neighborhood when that meant a neighborhood in which everyone worked not a euphemism for a welfare neighborhood. Adults- mostly stay at home moms- shared a notion of acceptable behavior and would counsel us when necessary. Rarely.

That neighborhood is now “diverse” and that sort of freedom – and the social foundation for it-is a thing of the past.

Mason on August 19, 2014 at 8:06 PM

On my first day of kindergarten in 1965 my grandmother walked me to school. The path involved five street crossings, including one across a busy four-lane street that had two 6th graders acting as crossing guards.

That was the last time anyone walked me to school.

OTOH – A few years later Steven Stayner was kidnapped while walking along a longer version of the same path I took.

myiq2xu on August 19, 2014 at 8:06 PM

Wait a minute! What’s a park?

unclesmrgol on August 19, 2014 at 8:07 PM

Bee – what do you mean? Bygone days? The bygone days I grew up in were nastier in the areas I lived in than where I am, where my family is, now. I told my parents lies to go hang out at south-of-Market punk-era clubs in my teens, and I’m not expecting my daughter’s going to do any better.

JEM on August 19, 2014 at 8:07 PM

“Go outside and play” is now a thing of the past.

unclesmrgol on August 19, 2014 at 8:05 PM

And being sent to your room is a reward, not a punishment!

whatcat on August 19, 2014 at 8:08 PM

A lot of us need to remember that our childhood bears little resemblance to today’s. When I was a kid the neighborhood existed of two parent families with stay at home moms. Those moms would be in the park and in their yards and they knew who you were and if you weren’t doing what you were suppose to be doing or if they saw anything out of place, they would raise hell.

Cindy Munford on August 19, 2014 at 8:08 PM

Cindy Munford on August 19, 2014 at 8:03 PM

Google maps + an understand that sh1t happens in Walmart parking lots. lol

She had to go around and behind said Walmart, through a wooded area to get to the park proper.

It’s just incredibly irresponsible.

You know, when we talk about at risk kids, particularly minority youth, we talk about inattentive parents. Kids who had too much time without parents or positive influence. This is a LITTLE GIRL, not even a middle schooler, without a peer group or friends or another adult helping out/keeping an eye out, charged to be mature enough to be alone during an entire workshift. It’s NOT ok.

Bee on August 19, 2014 at 8:09 PM

Wait a minute! What’s a park?

unclesmrgol on August 19, 2014 at 8:07 PM

Its where homo’s, perverts, and drug dealers gather to relax.

BobMbx on August 19, 2014 at 8:09 PM

JEM on August 19, 2014 at 8:07 PM

And is that where they live? Do you have kids? Do you work? Would you allow your 9 year old daughter to be alone in a public park for the duration of your shift, if so? I call bullsh!t.

Bee on August 19, 2014 at 8:10 PM

Cindy Munford on August 19, 2014 at 7:50 PM

No, the state did not establish that as an age of responsibility. They established that as the age the mother should quit working and spend all of her time as a welfare mom.

unclesmrgol on August 19, 2014 at 8:11 PM

BobMbx on August 19, 2014 at 8:09 PM

The parks I grew up frequenting are now known for gay sex romps/meetups, no lie. :) Fun facts!

Bee on August 19, 2014 at 8:11 PM

If you receive some form of government assistance, go figure that you trust government enough to give it more of a role in making sure kids aren’t being neglected by mom and dead in public spaces.

May I suggest “Mom and Dad”?

Who knew AllahP spoke with an accent when talking to his Dragon? o_O

Newtie and the Beauty on August 19, 2014 at 8:12 PM

My God, what drivel.

Sounds like the want to prime the pump for the “Libertarian moment”.

formwiz on August 19, 2014 at 8:12 PM

And IF you allow your nine year old daughter to run around unattended during your workshift, I’m completely effing freaked out as a parent.

From 1990 (when I was 8) and on I routinely spent most of my summer vacation at home (minus short term camps with friends). Would play with neighbor kids in the park a couple blocks away. Go to their house and swim (with their parents home). When I was 10 I would constantly ride my bike to the video store and get video games and movies to watch during the day. The horror…

I do understand the concern that a kid is unsupervised 10-12 hours a day but believe people are definitely overreacting.

nextgen_repub on August 19, 2014 at 8:12 PM

Should it be illegal to make your kids travel from Honduras to the US via drug and human traffickers?

El_Terrible on August 19, 2014 at 7:49 PM

Nooooo! That’s an act of love!

slickwillie2001 on August 19, 2014 at 8:12 PM

To this day, my sisters can’t quite understand why I wouldn’t piss on them if they were on fire.

Times change.

Tard on August 19, 2014 at 8:01 PM

Awesome story, very good one. No wonder you’re a “tard”. What? your sisters never got nicer?

arnold ziffel on August 19, 2014 at 8:13 PM

When I was a 9 year old I’d leave in the morning, travel far and wide to the quarry, city downtown, the railroad yard (steal ball bearings from the car’s axle box for marble game), the dump (hello to the homeless) and beyond – always home by five for dinner.

lel2007 on August 19, 2014 at 8:13 PM

unclesmrgol on August 19, 2014 at 8:11 PM

Hmmm, that’s an interesting way of looking at it.

Cindy Munford on August 19, 2014 at 8:14 PM

On my first day of kindergarten in 1965 my grandmother walked me to school. The path involved five street crossings, including one across a busy four-lane street that had two 6th graders acting as crossing guards.

That was the last time anyone walked me to school.

OTOH – A few years later Steven Stayner was kidnapped while walking along a longer version of the same path I took.

myiq2xu on August 19, 2014 at 8:06 PM

That’s sad. Life is full of risks. I don’t mean that to be trite, but there’s no way to avoid the risks outside of bubble-wrapping kids and having them sit on the couch all day.

whatcat on August 19, 2014 at 8:14 PM

Cindy Munford on August 19, 2014 at 8:08 PM

Exactly. I have kids this age, and I know NO ONE. We are WAY more insular that before. Couple that with the responsibility I;d feel as a mom if I saw a kid alone in the park with no parent……I’d be completely freaked out, wouldn’t want to leave, would feel the need to call the parent. It’s not my job to parent them.

Bee on August 19, 2014 at 8:15 PM

Its where homo’s, perverts, and drug dealers gather to relax.

BobMbx on August 19, 2014 at 8:09 PM

Maybe that’s why Republicans feel as they do. I myself was in a park once as a 15 year old, and had one of those perverts open the stall door while I was sitting and attempt to *reach*. WHatever he was expecting, he certainly did not get.

From that standpoint, things begin to make sense.

unclesmrgol on August 19, 2014 at 8:15 PM

Okay, I have a different question. Would you let your grandchildren go to the park alone at nine?

Cindy Munford on August 19, 2014 at 8:15 PM

Life is full of risks. I don’t mean that to be trite, but there’s no way to avoid the risks outside of bubble-wrapping kids and having them sit on the couch all day.

whatcat on August 19, 2014 at 8:14 PM

Bubble wrapping is making sure that your (very) minor daughter has some adult supervision while you work full time? News to me.

Bee on August 19, 2014 at 8:16 PM

OTOH – A few years later Steven Stayner was kidnapped while walking along a longer version of the same path I took.

myiq2xu on August 19, 2014 at 8:06 PM

My mom walked to school every day with her friend in early elementary. They would part ways at the bend in the road. One day he never showed up. He was found murdered and beheaded.

Sometimes bad things happen.

Bee on August 19, 2014 at 8:18 PM

IF this is accurate, it demonstrates why America is in decline. Too many are looking to Government to do what families should be doing. Allapundit’s comment about the loss of trust amongst neighbors rings true. Yet, helping a neighbor in today’s America brings the risk of being destroyed financially by a lawsuit because someone wasn’t happy with the outcome or even criminal charges (ref. Rick Perry).

Should a child be playing in the park alone? It all depends. How responsible, aware, and mature is the kid? What park? What’s the neighborhood like? Will other people be around? How long? How far away are the parents and/or help if needed? Many more questions may be added in.

Should it be categorically illegal? It would be an insult to individual freedom, personal capability, and initiative.

Criminalizing what have traditionally been judgement-calls based on what the most fearful, least capable, and/or responsibility-refusing amongst us can handle drives the downward spiral America’s currently caught in.

Perfesser on August 19, 2014 at 8:19 PM

Bee on August 19, 2014 at 8:15 PM

My kids lived charmed lives, the neighbor was a dream, for some reason it was a multi generational neighborhood, everyone knew everyone and you were on a first name basis with the people at the elementary school. Everyone should have it that good.

Cindy Munford on August 19, 2014 at 8:19 PM

This is one of those US stats I as an immigrant will never understand.

Back in the old country, it is completely normal to leave your stroller with the baby on the street while you go inside to shop or have a meal at a café, etc. Even if the temperature is -10…

http://m.bbc.com/news/magazine-21537988

Norwegian on August 19, 2014 at 8:20 PM

From that standpoint, things begin to make sense.

unclesmrgol on August 19, 2014 at 8:15 PM

Maybe you should narrow your stance somewhat.

BobMbx on August 19, 2014 at 8:20 PM

Arm the kids.

kcewa on August 19, 2014 at 8:22 PM

I was starting dried grass fires in city parks in Brooklyn when I was nine.

Walter L. Newton on August 19, 2014 at 8:22 PM

Okay, I have a different question. Would you let your grandchildren go to the park alone at nine?

Cindy Munford on August 19, 2014 at 8:15 PM

PM or AM?

kcewa on August 19, 2014 at 8:23 PM

Okay, I have a different question. Would you let your grandchildren go to the park alone at nine?

Cindy Munford on August 19, 2014 at 8:15 PM

No, they should be asleep in bed at nine!
:D

whatcat on August 19, 2014 at 8:25 PM

kcewa on August 19, 2014 at 8:23 PM

Either. I know you wouldn’t let them go in the p.m.

Cindy Munford on August 19, 2014 at 8:26 PM

kcewa on August 19, 2014 at 8:23 PM

You beat me to the pun.

whatcat on August 19, 2014 at 8:26 PM

whatcat on August 19, 2014 at 8:25 PM

LOL!

Cindy Munford on August 19, 2014 at 8:27 PM

Norwegian on August 19, 2014 at 8:20 PM

And what happened to change that?

BobMbx on August 19, 2014 at 8:27 PM

82% of those polled should not be allowed to vote.

Jaibones on August 19, 2014 at 8:31 PM

A couple years back I was in Canada and the lady at the gas staion told me her 6 year old had just been arrested for riding his bike without a helmet…for the 30th time.

Don’t know if we’re there yet

halfbaked on August 19, 2014 at 8:33 PM

arm the kids. kcewa on August 19, 2014 at 8:22 PM

We used to be able to take rifles and shotguns to school and keep them in our lockers. We hunted the woods after class. In third grade I took in my Geandfathers captured 7.7 jap for show & tell.

We even had drive your farm tractor to school week.

I didn’t live in Nebraska 100 years ago. About 30 miles north of Baltimore in the 70′s-80′s.

wolly4321 on August 19, 2014 at 8:35 PM

Cindy Munford on August 19, 2014 at 8:27 PM

Seriously though, I think it’s as you said earlier – you’d have to consider the kids and the venue. But with so many kids having cellphones these days, it’s alot easier to keep contact.

Actually didn’t go to the parks much when I was a youngun, pretty much all the kids had back yards. We could play sidewalk games, too, And then there was always the alley, if nothing else.

But what do I know from grankids? I ain’t got none. And got no grammar, either – I miss her.

whatcat on August 19, 2014 at 8:35 PM

The parks I grew up frequenting are now known for gay sex romps/meetups, no lie. :) Fun facts!

Bee on August 19, 2014 at 8:11 PM

Excellent example of someone projecting what they think may be happening in one place must be happening everywhere, therefore they must limit everyone else’s options by force of law.

My mom walked to school every day with her friend in early elementary. They would part ways at the bend in the road. One day he never showed up. He was found murdered and beheaded.

Sometimes bad things happen.

Bee on August 19, 2014 at 8:18 PM

IF this were true, it ads to the example of projecting one’s fears and tramas onto everyone else’s lives, and limiting their freedom accordingly. Exit question: When does 1 local incident become the basis for constitutionally-consistent, national policy/laws?

Perfesser on August 19, 2014 at 8:36 PM

My view could not possibly be more the opposite.

We should require by law kids to play in the park unsupervised.

Then people would get serious about getting rid of the predators. It is really not that difficult once a society sets its mind to it.

fadetogray on August 19, 2014 at 8:37 PM

What about all the 25 …oh and 18 year old…..kids?

Pathetic people. Come one.

How did I ever survive.

Are people allowed to let their kids in the own back yard unsupervised(though a parent is at home)?

Pass out those kid leashes to everyone…strap em to your nine year olds you big bunch of worry worts

CW on August 19, 2014 at 8:40 PM

Wow, I am in the minority.

J.B. Say on August 19, 2014 at 8:42 PM

Should it be illegal to make your kids travel from Honduras to the US via drug and human traffickers?

El_Terrible on August 19, 2014 at 7:49 PM

In fact, it should not be illegal it should be encouraged. Think about it. Your kid gets to stay , and then, anyone that dares even stand up to that gets to be called a racist when you try to join them. Oh and those that object are heartless haters.

CW on August 19, 2014 at 8:44 PM

“Nations have a tendency to become pacified and effeminate through a long peace and idleness”.

Niccolo Machiavelli.

Ruckus_Tom on August 19, 2014 at 8:48 PM

Wow, I am in the minority.

J.B. Say on August 19, 2014 at 8:42 PM

So why do you coddle your kids?

Do you let them play in your own yard? Alone?

CW on August 19, 2014 at 8:49 PM

fadetogray on August 19, 2014 at 8:37 PM

Who can we get to sponsor the Bill for that? LOL

Problem is, too many people would still look to “Government” instead of coming together to clean up their Communities….as we see happening virtually everywhere these days.

Perfesser on August 19, 2014 at 8:50 PM

Excellent example of someone projecting what they think may be happening in one place must be happening everywhere, therefore they must limit everyone else’s options by force of law

Perfesser on August 19, 2014 at 8:36 PM

mmk. So, like I said, when you work full time during the day, what do you do to occupy your minor (9 year old) little girl?

Bee on August 19, 2014 at 8:51 PM

Parents: tell me your day care solution when you work full time and your kid is out of school.

Bee on August 19, 2014 at 8:52 PM

Parents: tell me your day care solution when you work full time and your kid is out of school.

Bee on August 19, 2014 at 8:52 PM

Duct-taping them to the wall?

whatcat on August 19, 2014 at 8:57 PM

Slate had an interesting piece a few weeks ago about “the shortening leash” of childhood, replete with a nifty interactive graph tracking changing attitudes about what age kids should be allowed to walk home from school.

Allahpundit on August 19, 2014 at 7:41 PM

.
I’ve already documented my experiences with Amish Church families. Their kids grow up doing activities that today, would make most “English” gasp with horror.
But their kids start working HARD by age 8, and are working construction by age 16 (the fact that it’s against child-labor laws be DAMNED). Most Amish young men and women are easily ready for “real life” and marriage by the time they’re 18.

It’s the lack of what USED to be “common discipline”.

Rush used to mention “defining deviancy down”.

I prefer to call it the extreme lowering of the bar, or altogether REMOVING it for defining “normal behavior.”

listens2glenn on August 19, 2014 at 9:00 PM

Problem is, too many people would still look to “Government” instead of coming together to clean up their Communities….as we see happening virtually everywhere these days.

Perfesser on August 19, 2014 at 8:50 PM

That is my point, and why what I suggested is the only real solution. It is the one I would implement were I Emperor for a few years.

People need an attitude adjustment. A radical attitude adjustment.

Your eight and ten year old kids being required to play in the park unsupervised for a few hours every day would quickly adjust your attitude about people convicted of having preyed upon children. Killing them would become no problem, no problem at all. You’d be screaming for their blood.

We shelter people too much. People forget about evil. They learn to pretend to themselves that it doesn’t really exist when in fact it is all around us just waiting for its chance to kill your child.

We used to not have this problem, back when we were ‘mean’ and ‘intolerant.’ We have forgotten this doesn’t have to be the way things are. We just have to decide to stop tolerating evil.

fadetogray on August 19, 2014 at 9:07 PM

Parents: tell me your day care solution when you work full time and your kid is out of school.

Bee on August 19, 2014 at 8:52 PM

Alinsky would be proud of anyone that fights freedom and America’s traditions by personalizing (and the demonizing) individuals’ decisions instead of addressing the actual question at hand.

Should it be illegal for a parent to allow a 9-year-old to play in a park unsupervised?

Those more interested in power and control of others will attack the individuals and attempt to challenge their every decisions. Some may even be mentally/emotionally warped by their life’s experiences.

Don’t fall for that mis-direction. Stay focused on the issue at hand.

This has been a fun thread!!

Perfesser on August 19, 2014 at 9:07 PM

Sorry but I think it is ridiculous that a nine-year-old with a cell phone in a park is irresponsible parenting, but having your 3-6 year old kids go over to the park with the other 40 kids in the daycare, to be ‘supervised’ by 2-3 adults who are more interested in their phones than in the kids is ‘responsible’.

Katja on August 19, 2014 at 9:08 PM

I don’t have time to read through the comments to see if anyone has said this yet, but it seems to me that low-income parents are the ones who more often can’t afford to supervise their children, so why would they support a law that required it?

As for my own opinion, although I think young children should be supervised, even if it’s just by members of the community who you trust, I’m not sure that the government intervention is the best solution here. After all, if government policies hurt the economy (as we usually allege) and cause more people to lack the money and/or time to supervise their kids, and then the govt. gets people in trouble for not supervising their kids, and possibly even takes someone’s kids away because of it, then I can’t help but come to the conclusion that the government is punishing its citizens for the inevitable results of its own policies.

It’s like setting up a construction detour going the wrong way down a one-way street, and then fining people who are taking that detour. Except worse.

Cheshire_Kat on August 19, 2014 at 9:08 PM

We used to not have this problem, back when we were ‘mean’ and ‘intolerant.’ We have forgotten this doesn’t have to be the way things are. We just have to decide to stop tolerating evil.

fadetogray on August 19, 2014 at 9:07 PM

Exactly!! Yet, I fear we’re too far gone for even this simple, logical step to bear fruit.

Well said, fadetogray…

Perfesser on August 19, 2014 at 9:10 PM

Next time you need to run some errands, just drop your kids off at the local precinct. Problem solved.

questionmark on August 19, 2014 at 9:11 PM

I can’t hardly wait until Americans blindly adopt Sharia law and won’t let their women out alone, to the park or anywhere else in public unless in the company of a male.

Reuben Hick on August 19, 2014 at 9:12 PM

Sorry but I think it is ridiculous that a nine-year-old with a cell phone in a park is irresponsible parenting, but having your 3-6 year old kids go over to the park with the other 40 kids in the daycare, to be ‘supervised’ by 2-3 adults who are more interested in their phones than in the kids is ‘responsible’.

Katja on August 19, 2014 at 9:08 PM

I second that, Ktaja!!

Perfesser on August 19, 2014 at 9:13 PM

listens2glenn on August 19, 2014 at 9:00 PM

And just last week two Amish sisters were kidnapped from their families farm stand and sexually abused before being let go. What a world.

Cindy Munford on August 19, 2014 at 9:14 PM

Yikes…that should have been “Katja”….I apologize for the sloppy spelling…..

Perfesser on August 19, 2014 at 9:14 PM

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