NYT: Say, this indictment of the super-awful Rick Perry does look a little suspect to us

posted at 12:41 pm on August 19, 2014 by Ed Morrissey

When the New York Times editorial board rebukes Democrats for perverting the criminal justice system in a political attack against a Republican, the shark has well and truly been jumped. This is an editorial board that is not exactly known for its even-handed consistency when it comes to political attacks, and which spends most of its political effort hailing Democrats for doing the same things it laments when Republicans do them. In fact, today’s editorial spends most of its time calling Texas Governor Rick Perry the worst thing since New Coke, while bookending their scolding by reminding Texas Democrats that politics isn’t a crime:

Gov. Rick Perry of Texas is one of the least thoughtful and most damaging state leaders in America, having done great harm to immigrants, abortion clinics and people without health insurance during his 14 years in office. But bad political judgment is not necessarily a felony, and the indictment handed up against him on Friday — given the facts so far — appears to be the product of an overzealous prosecution. …

Governors and presidents threaten vetoes and engage in horse-trading all the time to get what they want, but for that kind of political activity to become criminal requires far more evidence than has been revealed in the Perry case so far. Perhaps Mr. McCrum will have some solid proof to show once the case heads to trial. But, for now, Texas voters should be more furious at Mr. Perry for refusing to expand Medicaid, and for all the favors he has done for big donors, than for a budget veto.

One has to read this editorial to appreciate the angst it engendered in the Gray Lady’s panel of handwringers. It’s an expert lesson in the use of weasel words. They are declarative on Perry being “one of the most damaging state leaders in America” despite having won enough confidence from Texans to serve four consecutive terms running their state government. On the other hand, the “ill-advised veto” only “doesn’t seem to rise to the level of a criminal act.” The voters of Texas should be “furious” at Perry for opposing Medicaid expansion, but Rosemary Lehmberg should only “los[e] her credibility as a prosecutor of drunk-driving cases” for threatening to get police officers fired for arresting and booking her for her DWI. And so on.

Unfortunately, the abuse of power on this episode cannot escape even their notice, which is why they waggled their finger at Texas Democrats today. That should serve as a warning, because it’s no secret that Democrats take their cues from the New York Times, and this means that they will be very much on their own. If the Times editorial board won’t run interference for them, they’re not going to have any political cover at all.

By the way, Tom Delay told everyone yesterday, “I told you so.” Delay had been convicted of corruption based on a prosecution from the same public-integrity unit, which eventually got overturned by a higher court — one not in Travis County, Delay points out. Republicans need to push this function into the state Attorney General’s office to prevent future abuses of power, he advises. In fact, Delay believes that this indictment demonstrates a “conspiracy” by Democrats to abuse power and smear Republicans for electoral advantage, and not just in Texas:

DeLay told Fox News on Monday that he wanted Perry to do more to dismantle the agency and that for years he has openly questioned its constitutionality, arguing in part that the district attorney in charge is locally elected but has statewide jurisdiction.

DeLay said Monday he cannot prove that Washington Democrats are trying to knock Perry out of the 2016 race but added the situation reminded him of when House Democrats Nancy Pelosi, of California, and Patrick Kennedy of Rhode Island, were trying to drum him out of Congress in the mid-1990s.

“Democrats love what’s going on,” he said. “They used the legal system to take me out. It is a conspiracy to use the legal system to criminalize politics.”

DeLay also offered words of advice to Perry.

“You better take this seriously,” he said. “All of the judges are Democrats. And we polled 300 jurors, and the best I got was a Green Peace activist.”

Maybe that’s why the Gray Lady is distancing itself from the debacle.

The Washington Post’s editorial board struck a much more convincing chord:

It’s true that the case revolves around bare-knuckled tactics by Mr. Perry (R). Last year, he threatened to veto $7.5 million in funding for the prosecutorial unit in Austin that investigates public corruption, unless that unit’s boss, an elected Democratic district attorney, resigned. That was bound to be controversial, given that the office was looking into the purported diversion of state cancer research funds to Mr. Perry’s political allies — and that Mr. Perry would appoint a successor. However, the governor acted only after the Travis County district attorney, Rosemary Lehmberg, was caught on video committing a pretty spectacular drunk driving offense that eventually cost her 45 days in jail. Many people would find it reasonable to pursue the ouster of such a person from such a position. When Ms. Lehmberg refused to go, Mr. Perry carried out his veto.

What everyone should recognize is that this particular kerfuffle fell within the bounds of partisan politics, which, as the saying goes, ain’t beanbag. The grand jury, however, would criminalize Mr. Perry’s conduct by twisting the pertinent statutes into a pair of pretzels. The indictment contends that vetoing funding for Ms. Lehmberg’s unit violated a Texas “abuse of official capacity” law against the knowing “misuse” of government funds with intent to “harm another.” Even more implausibly, the indictment characterizes the mere threat of a veto as “coercion of a public servant,” even though the relevant law pretty clearly wasn’t intended to cover a governor’s exercise of his constitutional powers. By the weird logic of the indictment, Mr. Perry would have been in the clear if he had simply vetoed the funding without threatening to do so first. …

Of course, public servants should be held to a higher standard. But criminal prosecution is not always the appropriate remedy for dubious or despicable behavior by those in power, especially not where the relevant law is not clearly applicable. Political abuses call for political accountability, which is why we have media exposure, elections and impeachment. Mr. Perry is not a candidate for reelection; his term ends in a few months. Perhaps some of those in Texas who back his indictment hope to derail his reported plans for another run at the presidency in 2016. If so, they are going about it the wrong way.

The NYT editorial did manage to work in Lehmberg’s threats to police officers, which the Post’s editorial missed, but otherwise sounds a lot more convincing.

Update (AP): Yikes.


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They are being smart taking the high road. Because if down the line some BS impeachment of Obama comes up, they want to be able to call BS with a straight face.

coolrepublica on August 19, 2014 at 12:43 PM

The special prosecutor should be ridiculed and mocked.

Blake on August 19, 2014 at 12:44 PM

So where is the New York Times’ editorial on new York Democrat governor Andrew Cuomo’s actually shutting down an ethics investigation when it reached his office? What does Andrew Cuomo have to hide?

rbj on August 19, 2014 at 12:45 PM

They are being smart taking the high road. Because if down the line some BS impeachment of Obama comes up, they want to be able to call BS with a straight face.

coolrepublica on August 19, 2014 at 12:43 PM

Squirrels are having a party today, laughing at you.

Get real. Surely you can!

Schadenfreude on August 19, 2014 at 12:48 PM

The special prosecutor should be ridiculed and mocked.

Blake on August 19, 2014 at 12:44 PM

The special prosecutor should be tarred and feathered. So should the judge if he/she/it (we are talking about Austin) doesn’t immediately dismiss the case with PREJUDICE.

There is no crime here. Even if the prosecutor’s allegations are 100% factual, Perry’s actions DO NOT CONSTITUTE A CRIME!

That is, unless a law was passed that makes it illegal to object to a criminal DUI offender as a prosecutor, then use the plenary VETO power given to the governor to spare the People of Texas from having to pay for this drunkard. Even if that law existed it’d be Unconstitutional…

ConstantineXI on August 19, 2014 at 12:48 PM

Perry will benefit from this. It’s all funded by Soros, for the dummies around here.

Schadenfreude on August 19, 2014 at 12:49 PM

I posted this on the headlines thread on this subject, but thought I’d throw it here too:

The indictment is stunning evidence of just how corrupt the democrats in Texas, including democrat prosecutors, are.

When you are that brazen in your corruptness, it shows that you are so corrupt that you don’t even understand the need to hide the corruption any longer (“huh? what? what’s the problem with abusing your political office for personal gain?”).

And, this should make all Texans, at least in that prosecutor’s district, very Leary of all prosecutions. Because the prosecutor that brought this indictment is obviously willing to subvert the law for his own partisan ends.

that is actually quite scary. When people are that open with their corruption it means that they don’t fear any consequences for being corrupt. If they are right, and they don’t face any consequences, it means the rule of law does not exist – at least in that district.

it is very sad. There is always going to be some level of corruption, that is human nature. But we try to fight it and oppose it at all time.

When corruption gets to the point of being seen as normal and acceptable (i.e., it is done openly and with pride) – and the voters don’t care, then we are a third-world banana republic.

Monkeytoe on August 19, 2014 at 12:50 PM

It is a conspiracy and should be prosecuted. I want to see jail sentences.

John the Libertarian on August 19, 2014 at 12:51 PM

The takeaway for NYT readers: Perry is a horrible person and deserved it anyway.

The smears will continue until you convert to a RINO.

MT on August 19, 2014 at 12:51 PM

Setting the Record Straight

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mbXHg7_Zqjc

redguy on August 19, 2014 at 12:51 PM

Awesome screen cap! LOL!

CurtZHP on August 19, 2014 at 12:51 PM

When corruption gets to the point of being seen as normal and acceptable (i.e., it is done openly and with pride) – and the voters don’t care, then we are a third-world banana republic.

Monkeytoe on August 19, 2014 at 12:50 PM

You just described the FUNDAMENTAL Transformation of America that Obama and his handlers desire.

And have all but pulled off.

ConstantineXI on August 19, 2014 at 12:54 PM

We just went through this in Wisconsin where a 4 year John Doe probe was brought against Gov. Walker by a leftist DA trying to weaken public support for Walker. It led to nothing, but cost the taxpayer lots of money and revealed the length and breadth the leftists will travel to try and smear someone they identify as a threat!

Deano1952 on August 19, 2014 at 12:55 PM

Lehmberg’s conduct on video makes this a no sale.

formwiz on August 19, 2014 at 12:55 PM

This is what the Democrat Party does…See Delay, Tom.

Maybe someday in my Lifetime, Republicans will understand this,
and start being RELENTLESS in fighting back. Alas…..

ToddPA on August 19, 2014 at 12:55 PM

One has to read this editorial to appreciate the angst it engendered in the Gray Lady’s panel of handwringers.

Probably the most angst and frustration they’ve had in the Times’ editorial room since they couldn’t figure out a way not to endorse Rudy Giuliani for re-election in 1997.

jon1979 on August 19, 2014 at 12:59 PM

The special prosecutor should be ridiculed and mocked.
Blake on August 19, 2014 at 12:44 PM

He needs to be disbarred. Dems need to pay a price for these abuses.

Bill-Republic of Texas on August 19, 2014 at 1:00 PM

Rick Perry needs to turn around and sue the hell out of every last one of these jokers. They need to be picking through dumpsters for their daily bread.

CurtZHP on August 19, 2014 at 1:02 PM

NYT’s initial piece mentions the Delay indictment but doesn’t bother to mention that his conviction was overturned in a higher court.

Ms. Lehmberg is Austin’s top prosecutor and oversees a powerful public corruption unit that investigates state, local and federal officials; its work led to the 2005 indictment of a former Republican congressman, Tom DeLay, on charges of violating campaign finance laws.

That’s it. It’s almost as if they are trying to give the reader the impression the he is guilty or that the case is still pending in court.

forest on August 19, 2014 at 1:03 PM

Perry will benefit from this. It’s all funded by Soros, for the dummies around here.

Schadenfreude on August 19, 2014 at 12:49 PM

Texans for Public Justice…..if my feeble mind is working.

HonestLib on August 19, 2014 at 1:03 PM

But criminal prosecution is not always the appropriate remedy for dubious or despicable behavior by those in power, especially not where the relevant law is not clearly applicable.

They tell you what they fear.

RadClown on August 19, 2014 at 1:03 PM

If you want to put the Left’s Plan into context, read RedState’s

Lawfare: When Screaming Racism, ‘War on Women,’ and Impeachment Are Not Enough

New Mexico, Democrats drummed up investigations in Gov. Susana Martinez

New Jersey, Chris Christie has had to deal with the “bridge gate” investigation

Georgia, Nathan Deal, up for re-election this year, continues to see Democrats demand a federal and state investigation into his relationship with the State Ethics Commission

Wisconsin, a federal judge shut down an investigation into Gov. Scott Walker

In 2012, during the course of state legislative races, rumors swirled to the press that Gov. Nikki Haley in South Carolina would be subject to an IRS case of tax fraud.

faraway on August 19, 2014 at 1:04 PM

When corruption gets to the point of being seen as normal and acceptable (i.e., it is done openly and with pride) – and the voters don’t care, then we are a third-world banana republic.

Monkeytoe on August 19, 2014 at 12:50 PM

When the only way the citizens can survive is to accept and practice corruption…….you become the old Soviet Union.

HonestLib on August 19, 2014 at 1:06 PM

When the only way the citizens can survive is to accept and practice corruption…….you become the old Soviet Union.

HonestLib on August 19, 2014 at 1:06 PM

No kidding, Russia Today reports that most looters in Ferguson, protesters too, are white.

Schadenfreude on August 19, 2014 at 1:09 PM

Disinformation was invented by Putin, as a tool against the people, but obama has perfected it.

Schadenfreude on August 19, 2014 at 1:09 PM

Gov. Rick Perry of Texas is one of the least thoughtful and most damaging state leaders in America, having done great harm to immigrants…

Yo, NYT! Perry signed a bill granting in-state tuition to illegals!

Imagine that–Out of state American Citizens who wish to attend college in Texas have to pay MORE in tuition fees than out-of-country citizens in this country ILLEGALLY.

Newtie and the Beauty on August 19, 2014 at 1:11 PM

My concern as a Texan is why would a county prosecutor have any jurisdiction over alleged crimes against the State? Just because the Capital is in Travis County shouldn’t make their DA’s office any more powerful than say Dallas County.

Could a DA in very conservative county bring suit against Wendy Davis because she is threatening to veto or eliminate an existing Texas law?

Just stupid when you take this to it’s next logical conclusion.

Tater Salad on August 19, 2014 at 1:13 PM

Gov. Rick Perry of Texas is one of the least thoughtful and most damaging state leaders in America, having done great harm to immigrants, abortion clinics and people without health insurance during his 14 years in office.

Yes, he should tarred and feathered for overseeing the state with the highest job growth, lowest unemployment and zero state taxes. Let’s string him up for securing his state’s border. How can anyone do harm to an abortion clinic/death factory?

Liberals really are quite insane!

cajunpatriot on August 19, 2014 at 1:22 PM

Squirrels are having a party today, laughing at you.

Get real. Surely you can!

Schadenfreude on August 19, 2014 at 12:48 PM

Squirrels are having a party? Can I attend?

coolrepublica on August 19, 2014 at 1:24 PM

Yo, NYT! Perry signed a bill granting in-state tuition to illegals!

Imagine that–Out of state American Citizens who wish to attend college in Texas have to pay MORE in tuition fees than out-of-country citizens in this country ILLEGALLY.

Newtie and the Beauty on August 19, 2014 at 1:11 PM

Much as I respect this regular poster, this crap needs to be debunked once again.

The statute signed by the Governor was PASSED by the Texas Legislature, and was approved of by a majority of Texans.

Any illegal alien teenagers who apply for in-state tuition have a bunch of conditions for which they must pre-qualify; among them providing proof of residence for 5 or more? years (not positive on the number) attending a Texas high school freshman year until graduation and lastly swearing that they intend to seek legal status when they are of age.

Like it or not, this is the will of the people of Texas and we are not a bunch of pansy Northerners with an only theoretical knowledge of illegal alien invasion.

Dolce Far Niente on August 19, 2014 at 1:25 PM

Dolce Far Niente on August 19, 2014 at 1:25 PM

Why should Texas taxpayers agree to pay for education for an invader? I think that the people of Texas were generous with the conditions laid down.

cajunpatriot on August 19, 2014 at 1:33 PM

Newtie and the Beauty on August 19, 2014 at 1:11 PM

I’m a HUGE Perry supporter-but I was bothered by the fact that my son had to be here a year prior to getting ‘instate’-while some…you know was given it right of the bat.
Still-I blame the state legislature for it-not Perry.

annoyinglittletwerp on August 19, 2014 at 1:34 PM

The special prosecutor is being ridiculed and mocked, from the right and the left. I would mot be surprised if he admits he made a mistake and withdraws the charges. The fringe left here in Texas is getting roasted over this because it gives Perry instant credibility regarding his moral compass and ethics. Show that drunk DA video one more time please.

Ellis on August 19, 2014 at 1:37 PM

Dolce Far Niente on August 19, 2014 at 1:25 PM

Likewise, the same came up in our state and never came up for a vote. Our state also has a large population of illegal aliens. Thanks for your additional information as I believe we should scrutinize any one who has higher aspirations.

I believe in Federalism and accept the will of the people of Texas. I do wonder what is the opinion of the law Texas passed at the national level.

Just discussing and not trying to argue.

HonestLib on August 19, 2014 at 1:39 PM

I’m a HUGE Perry supporter-but I was bothered by the fact that my son had to be here a year prior to getting ‘instate’-while some…you know was given it right of the bat.
Still-I blame the state legislature for it-not Perry.

annoyinglittletwerp on August 19, 2014 at 1:34 PM

they weren’t given in-state tuition “right of the bat.” they had to meet more stringent requirements to qualify. and whether it’s right or wrong only a few hundred illegal aliens have ever used the provision.

chasdal on August 19, 2014 at 1:39 PM

Let’s remember, this organization “Texans for Public Justice”, is funded by the Democratics’ favorite Nazi stooge George Soros.

Someone should be doing lawfare on his ass, finding out how he evaded extradition to France for financial fraud, and how he avoided prosecution at Nuremberg.

slickwillie2001 on August 19, 2014 at 1:41 PM

TWO WORDS: OPEN BORDERS.

Though I’m no fan of Rick Perry this smells of cutting him off at the knees so he can’t stop the INVASION from the South.

Viva the new Mexican state of TEJAS.

PappyD61 on August 19, 2014 at 1:44 PM

Perry will benefit from this. It’s all funded by Soros, for the dummies around here.

Schadenfreude on August 19, 2014 at 12:49 PM

I doubt that. Texas Democrats are a breed unto themselves. They are first of all completely dependent on the trial lawyers for funding for all of their campaigns, not George Soros. Texas trial lawyers play dirty and always have. Second of all, they have still not gotten over losing power at the state level and have become increasingly desperate to get it back. The Tom Delay proescution happened because Delay started meddling in Texas state legislative campaigns and the Democrats could not stand for that.

Travis County is their last redoubt, and they are using the biggest stick they have to keep whacking at Republican leaders. The DA’s office takes its cue from the trial lawyers, who make a living getting gullible juries to believe crazy legal theories and bizarre statutory interpretations. We should never be surprised at anything that comes out of that office.

Delay is right, it is way past time for the legislature to end this travesty and get the Public Integrity Section out of the Travis DA’s office. If the morons in Travis want to elect drunk whack jobs like Lehmberg and keep her there that’s just fine, but neither she nor her successors should be allowed to bring corruption cases at the state level.

rockmom on August 19, 2014 at 1:47 PM

I don’t understand why that one county has jurisdiction over the entire state when it comes to public “integrity”…that just seems like a very bizarre setup. I suppose it helps keep it independent of the state gov’t, to a certain extent, but obviously it also means it can be abused for extreme partisan ends.

The few Democrats who haven’t completely lost their minds know they’ve stepped in it down there with this charade. Not only is the indictment itself nonsensical and ridiculous, by pursuing it they’ve in effect put themselves on the side of a convicted drunk driver who is on tape threatening officers, or doing the very thing they in turn accused Perry of doing. Nice going, idiots. If this isn’t laughed out of court at the very first opportunity, the judge ought to have his head examined.

changer1701 on August 19, 2014 at 1:51 PM

The few Democrats who haven’t completely lost their minds know they’ve stepped in it down there with this charade. Not only is the indictment itself nonsensical and ridiculous, by pursuing it they’ve in effect put themselves on the side of a convicted drunk driver who is on tape threatening officers, or doing the very thing they in turn accused Perry of doing. Nice going, idiots. If this isn’t laughed out of court at the very first opportunity, the judge ought to have his head examined.

changer1701 on August 19, 2014 at 1:51 PM

Exactly! It’s also forced the media to repeat that previous political prosecutions by this DA’s office (Kay Bailey Hutchison and Tom Delay) ended in dismissals of the charges. So this office has a reputation for bringing legally dubious charges against Republicans. Now it has become a laughingstock and made Rick Perry a martyr for good government.

rockmom on August 19, 2014 at 2:00 PM

Tempest in a Teapot.

But the Manure Spreading Media needs a diverson (Squirrel) if either Ferguson or the IS (Islamnic Savages) don’t claim the air-time needed to keep LIVeral attention away from King Putt.

Curious, has anyone seen or heard from Joke Biden lately?
Seventy-seven days … and not much time to formulate an October Surprise!

Missilengr on August 19, 2014 at 2:06 PM

Of critical importance in understanding why the Texas Dems are going forward with this travesty is that they were desperate to avoid a Republican appointee in this office, who would have the power and the purview to examine Travis County corruption, which is legendary and has been staunchly protected by this office.

They felt they had to strike back, no matter how nonsensical it seems to outsiders.

I don’t know whether the national Party will be able to convince them that this is too much to gamble on, considering what a backfire will do to enhance Perry’s 2016 aspirations.

Perhaps they to are hoping this takes down another capable governor, without having DNC fingerprints on it.

Dolce Far Niente on August 19, 2014 at 2:13 PM

…you know was given it right of the bat.
Still-I blame the state legislature for it-not Perry.

annoyinglittletwerp on August 19, 2014 at 1:34 PM

No they weren’t. And you should know better.

Y’all griping about this should read up first. It was a different era just a few years ago too.

cozmo on August 19, 2014 at 2:15 PM

I don’t understand why that one county has jurisdiction over the entire state when it comes to public “integrity”…that just seems like a very bizarre setup.
changer1701 on August 19, 2014 at 1:51 PM

It was a good idea at the time. Not so much now.

cozmo on August 19, 2014 at 2:17 PM

http://www.theconservativevoices.com/news/cat/political/perry-targeted-by-da-office

short videos as well as an hour long one

she is a disgrace

dmacleo on August 19, 2014 at 2:19 PM

That NYT editorial is hilarious. They know their audience is too shallow to tolerate a straight repudiation of the Perry prosecution — it goes against the code of their letterman sweaters.

So they have to castigate Perry more than the miscarriage of justice itself.

FishingwFredo on August 19, 2014 at 2:38 PM

Why should Texas taxpayers agree to pay for education for an invader? I think that the people of Texas were generous with the conditions laid down.

cajunpatriot on August 19, 2014 at 1:33 PM

Hell yes, Texas is generous. You can also qualify for in-state tuition if you are a resident of a county in New Mexico or Louisiana that borders Texas.

The Texas taxpayers approved of this measure not once but twice (admittedly, the first time was in 2001, which was a different world as far as illegals) and I believe its appropriate to leave it up to the people who pay for it.

Just sick of the nimrods who claim this is “Perry is pro-amnesty!!!elebenty!11!!!

Do yer damn homework.

Dolce Far Niente on August 19, 2014 at 2:57 PM

Just sick of the nimrods who claim this is “Perry is pro-amnesty!!!elebenty!11!!!

Dolce Far Niente on August 19, 2014 at 2:57 PM

Relax dude, not everybody has been graced by God to live in Texas.

Cut them some slack and explain how they are wrong.

As for those who are in Texas and getting it wrong…slap ‘em silly.

cozmo on August 19, 2014 at 3:01 PM

Relax dude, not everybody has been graced by God to live in Texas.

Cut them some slack and explain how they are wrong.

As for those who are in Texas and getting it wrong…slap ‘em silly.

cozmo on August 19, 2014 at 3:01 PM

*takes a deep breath and a sip of Shiner*

Its Dudette, partner.

Dolce Far Niente on August 19, 2014 at 3:08 PM

Dolce Far Niente on August 19, 2014 at 3:08 PM

Even better

cozmo on August 19, 2014 at 3:11 PM

*takes a deep breath and a sip of Shiner*

Its Dudette, partner.

Dolce Far Niente on August 19, 2014 at 3:08 PM

make that a shot of Tito’s followed by a Shiner!

WaldoTJ on August 19, 2014 at 4:04 PM

It seems to me Texas Republicans can take care of this Perry joke of an indictment fairly easily. Introduce a bill to remove State jurisdiction of these cases and remove the “Public Integrity Unit” out of Travis County to the State AG’s office, effective immediately – all cases future and pending are to be transferred upon the Governor’s signature.
The legislature can pass it (they have more than enough votes, no?), Perry can sign it, and that ends it. The State AG can assign a prosecutor with a brain and ethics to the Perry “case” and he/she can promptly drop it in the waste bucket. Have a big press conference announcing that this “shameful, politically-motivated prosecution” will no longer be pursued. As a bonus, they could also announce that “we will be opening a case on Mr. McCrum” for “abuse of power” for using his office to “impede or coerce a public official in the carrying out of the duties of his office.” And while they are at it they can take aim at the drunken AG of Travis County too.

Is there some reason why this can’t be done?

DocJ on August 19, 2014 at 4:10 PM

Rosemary Lehmberg, the D.A. in this case should not only be removed from her position on the special prosecutorial unit, she should be disbarred by the Texas Bar Association.

This is prosecutorial misconduct at its worst, on top of her drunk driving, which should have had her suspended from the bar, if not already permanently disbarred.

s1im on August 19, 2014 at 4:18 PM

The mug-shot will be epic in history.

Schadenfreude on August 19, 2014 at 4:35 PM

Is there some reason why this can’t be done?

DocJ on August 19, 2014 at 4:10 PM

Our legislature is part-time. Won’t be back in regular session until January 2015.

I don’t know if the governor can or would call a special session for this issue.

Dolce Far Niente on August 19, 2014 at 4:50 PM

Our legislature is part-time. Won’t be back in regular session until January 2015.

Another thing you all do right down there in Texas! We’ve been trying to get a part-time legislature for awhile up here in Michigan. No luck yet even though we have a Republican House and Senate and Governor. Maybe we need some primaries.

Anyway, can the House and Senate call a special session on their own, or do they need the governor? I would think Perry calling it would be inappropriate (even given what B.S. this indictment is), so if someone else could initiate it it would be best.

DocJ on August 19, 2014 at 5:27 PM