Roberts barely scrapes past Wolf in Kansas

posted at 10:41 am on August 6, 2014 by Ed Morrissey

Before the polls closed in Kansas yesterday, I predicted that the Republican primary for the US Senate race would be closer than people expected. The incumbent, Sen. Pat Roberts, hadn’t spent much time at home of late — and may not even own a home there at all any more — and losing touch with constituents was what doomed Eric Cantor. Roberts won, but only by single digits against his Tea Party challenger:

Veteran Republican Senator Pat Roberts fought off a Kansas primary challenge by a Tea Party-backed doctor who had promised a “family feud” with his distant relative President Barack Obama if elected, results on Wednesday showed.

Roberts secured 48 percent of the vote and Milton Wolf 41 percent in the four-candidate field, according to final but unofficial results, the Kansas secretary of state said.

Roberts has had a 47-year career in Congress and faced conservative challenger Wolf, who said he wanted to “save the Republic.”

Wolf acknowledged a distant family tie to Obama but built his campaign on promises to repeal many of the Democratic president’s policies. In an interview with CNN, Wolf promised “the mother of all family feuds to save America,” if elected.

Roberts didn’t even get to 50% in a state he’s represented for decades, against a novice candidate. He’ll win re-election easily in November, though; more than four times as many voters turned out in the GOP primary than in the Democrats’ competitive Senate primary. Democrats have a huge enthusiasm problem, and not just in Kansas, either.

The media line has been that this year’s results are a defeat for the Tea Party. Both CBS News and The Hill ran articles yesterday on the “fade” of the Tea Party, and today’s New York Times takes a more subtle approach to the same theme:

Senator Pat Roberts of Kansas held off the Tea Party insurgent Milton Wolf on Tuesday to defeat what may have been hard-line conservatives’ last chance at knocking off an incumbent Republican senator this year. …

The primary in Kansas on Tuesday, as well as the votes in Michigan and in Washington State, proved to be more about the power of incumbency than the Republicans’ civil war.

Tea Party incumbents generally held off challenges from establishment Republicans, and establishment incumbents beat back challengers from the right.

Well, maybe, but it’s far too early to declare the Tea Party dead. In my column for The Week, I argue that the Tea Party is a long-term phenomenon that is already succeeding in forcing the Republican Party and its incumbents to define themselves in terms of small-government conservatism:

The true test of the Tea Party won’t be in primary victories this week or this year, but in the impact of the conservative grassroots movement on the Republican Party. We have already seen incumbents who have rarely if ever had to deal with intraparty challengers shift their focus and message in response. The lack of banner wins in 2012 certainly didn’t persuade most of these incumbents to dismiss that pressure — in fact, the ones who succeeded most were the ones who prepared soonest and most vigorously.

When the New Left brand of progressivism arose in the 1960s, its candidates didn’t win a lot of elections at first either. It took two decades for the pressure of the movement to shift the center of the Democratic Party away from its traditional, blue-collar liberalism. In the late 1980s, the trend worried Democrats enough to form the Democratic Leadership Council to push back and recruit moderates to run for office, the most successful of which was Bill Clinton in 1992. By 2008, his wife blew her opening for the presidential nomination in part by falling short of the progressive credentials of Barack Obama.

The lesson here is not to count primaries in the short run. Look for the way incumbents have to defend their record, and wait for the grassroots to produce change organically over the long run.

We’ll also see Lamar Alexander defending his Senate seat tomorrow against Rep. Joe Carr, who picked up an endorsement from Laura Ingraham. Alexander routinely gets criticized by the grassroots, but he’s also been taking a page from Lindsey Graham and putting in plenty of retail-politicking effort in Tennessee over the last couple of years. There has been very little polling in this race, but what there has been looks similar to Kansas — the incumbent up by low double digits but looking vulnerable. Even if Alexander manages to survive, though, it won’t be because voters have rejected the Tea Party but because the incumbent has embraced it.


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47 years in Congress…

That’s part of the problem right there…

PatriotRider on August 6, 2014 at 10:45 AM

He can win in November without my vote.

cptacek on August 6, 2014 at 10:45 AM

Even if Alexander manages to survive, though, it won’t be because voters have rejected the Tea Party but because the incumbent has embraced campaigned on embracing it.

This is much more of a reality based statement.

airupthere on August 6, 2014 at 10:47 AM

hard to believe I’m too young to be enthused by the GOP…

DanMan on August 6, 2014 at 10:48 AM

I argue that the Tea Party is a long-term phenomenon that is already succeeding in forcing the Republican Party and its incumbents to define themselves in terms of small-government conservatism

I’d rather they govern as a fiscal conservative, instead of “defining themselves” as one.

Coming close doesn’t force the GOP to do that. It just forces them to do anything they can to win, as we saw in the Mississippi Cochran GOP-DNC partnership.

portlandon on August 6, 2014 at 10:48 AM

Can anyone say “term limits”
??

tencole on August 6, 2014 at 10:49 AM

Roberts has had a 47-year career in Congress

The GOP version of John Dingell.

Time to retire.

Bitter Clinger on August 6, 2014 at 10:49 AM

This is a race for the Senate, 2016 may be a race for the country.

bflat879 on August 6, 2014 at 10:54 AM

All the GOP infighting aside, I believe in the immortal words of former Raiders owner Al Davis, “just win, baby”.

Tater Salad on August 6, 2014 at 10:57 AM

Frankly, I believe the Tea Party in the form of organized groups is largely ethereal and has outlived its usefulness. In converting to formal groups it has lost clout and in many cases departed from its original purpose.

Most Tea Party groups appear to now have members who seem more libertarian than any other philosophy. Frankly, that does not bode well for the purpose we, as a Republican Party, want to pursue. In fact it is institutionalizing divisiveness.

However, the “tea party” as a loosely organized movement focused on dissatisfaction with our current governmental occupants and departure from constitutional principles is far from dead. But, we will see that first hand come November, when people across the spectrum show up to vote.

At that point you can credit to the common enemy of all Americans: a complacent, overbearing government that has not served its people in a long time.

Marcus Traianus on August 6, 2014 at 10:58 AM

Roberts barely scrapes past Wolf in Kansas

Since when is 48% to 41% “barely scraping past?”

Armyspouse on August 6, 2014 at 11:01 AM

Frankly, I believe the Tea Party in the form of organized groups is largely ethereal and has outlived its usefulness. In converting to formal groups it has lost clout and in many cases departed from its original purpose.

Most Tea Party groups appear to now have members who seem more libertarian than any other philosophy. Frankly, that does not bode well for the purpose we, as a Republican Party, want to pursue. In fact it is institutionalizing divisiveness.

However, the “tea party” as a loosely organized movement focused on dissatisfaction with our current governmental occupants and departure from constitutional principles is far from dead. But, we will see that first hand come November, when people across the spectrum show up to vote.

At that point you can credit to the common enemy of all Americans: a complacent, overbearing government that has not served its people in a long time.

Marcus Traianus on August 6, 2014 at 10:58 AM

Well said, and I would add one other thought. The TP movement should at the very least force sitting GOP Senators and Congressmen to become more accountable to their constituents.

Tater Salad on August 6, 2014 at 11:02 AM

However, the “tea party” as a loosely organized movement focused on dissatisfaction with our current governmental occupants and departure from constitutional principles is far from dead. But, we will see that first hand come November, when people across the spectrum show up to vote.

At that point you can credit to the common enemy of all Americans: a complacent, overbearing government that has not served its people in a long time.

Marcus Traianus on August 6, 2014 at 10:58 AM

Too bad they won’t have much of a choice at advancing limited government when they hit the polls in November.

Bitter Clinger on August 6, 2014 at 11:02 AM

Yeah, as soon as I saw that “47 years in congress” I wanted to spit.

He’s probably as out of touch with his constituents as Rascal Lugar and Weasel Boehner. All they know is working the DC hustle and spending just enough campaign loot to keep the re-election happening.

viking01 on August 6, 2014 at 11:05 AM

Ed is funny because all he wants is for Senators to lie about they believe during their campaign. Come next Jan. Republican Senators will still grow our debt big time and will grow the size of government and will legalize the illegals.

BroncosRock on August 6, 2014 at 11:05 AM

Too bad they won’t have much of a choice at advancing limited government when they hit the polls in November.

Bitter Clinger on August 6, 2014 at 11:02 AM

I actually think the notion of limited government is happening. Liberals are complaining that this Congress passed fewer bills than any other in decades. That’s a good thing, those bills always come with new spending/taxes/regulation. The fewer the better.

Tater Salad on August 6, 2014 at 11:06 AM

The guy is 78. It is absolutely pathetic the Senate is a retirement community.

Marcus on August 6, 2014 at 11:06 AM

I hate those posts that try to make bad news sound like excellent news. they treat the audience like children that can’t handle basic truth.

coolrepublica on August 6, 2014 at 11:07 AM

Ed is funny because all he wants is for Senators to lie about they believe during their campaign. Come next Jan. Republican Senators will still grow our debt big time and will grow the size of government and will legalize the illegals.

BroncosRock on August 6, 2014 at 11:05 AM

Yeah, Ed should be too smart to make himself look this naive on the issue of GOP incumbents “embracing” Tea Party principles.

Bitter Clinger on August 6, 2014 at 11:09 AM

I hate those posts that try to make bad news sound like excellent news. they treat the audience like children that can’t handle basic truth.

coolrepublica on August 6, 2014 at 11:07 AM

You mean like this one?

“Obama approval falls to 40/54 in NBC/WSJ poll”

VegasRick on August 6, 2014 at 11:10 AM

Roberts is an open borders AMNESTY SHILL for Illegal Aliens. He and Obama have no problem with Illegal Aliens KILLING WHITE MIDDLE CLASS AMERICA on American soil. Just like they did that poor homeless black guy in Maryland………

Realdemocrat1 on August 6, 2014 at 11:10 AM

I actually think the notion of limited government is happening. Liberals are complaining that this Congress passed fewer bills than any other in decades. That’s a good thing, those bills always come with new spending/taxes/regulation. The fewer the better.

Tater Salad on August 6, 2014 at 11:06 AM

When taking into consideration the Paul Ryan-Patty Murray budget and the GOP cave on the debt ceiling, you couldn’t prove it by me.

Bitter Clinger on August 6, 2014 at 11:11 AM

Here’s hoping Alexander goes down.

That aside, Graham, Cochran, and Roberts surviving primaries and McCain surviving his primary a cycle or two back–that’s pathetic. All of them should have been Cantorized.

BuckeyeSam on August 6, 2014 at 11:12 AM

The Tea Party is a long-term phenomenon that is already succeeding in forcing the Republican Party and its incumbents to define themselves in terms of small-government conservatism

If the GOP takes back the Senate (and with that takes back overall majority control of Washington, D.C.), they darned well better embrace small-government conservatism! They need to go back to the FY 2007 budget (the last passed by a GOP House & Senate) as their baseline, not the egregiously multiplied deficits of the last 6 Democrat-majority years.

Average Fiscal Year deficit as % of GDP:
——————————————————-
Post World War II 1947-1995: 1.8%
GOP Majorities 1996-2007: 0.8%
DEM Majorities 2008-2014: 6.4%!!

Data Source: http://www.whitehouse.gov/sites/default/files/omb/budget/fy2015/assets/hist01z2.xls

Democrat majorities from FY 2008-2014 have been running deficits that are on average EIGHT TIMES LARGER than the average deficits run by Republican majorities for FY 1996-2007.

DO NOT accept current FY 2014 spending levels as your “baseline”.

Go back to the FY 2007 spending levels as your “baseline”.

ITguy on August 6, 2014 at 11:13 AM

7 points is hardly a squeaker. Get real. Milton Wolff was an appalling candidate who posted inappropriate X-rays on his Facebook page.

Hilts on August 6, 2014 at 11:14 AM

The guy is 78. It is absolutely pathetic the Senate is a retirement community.

Marcus on August 6, 2014 at 11:06 AM

You have to have some humility to know when to retire voluntarily.

celtic warrior on August 6, 2014 at 11:14 AM

Ed Statist had time to wait, WE DO NOT HAVE TIME. This was our second to the last stop before US is doomed. The last stop is in who the Republican party will nominate in 2016. If the voters listen to progressive Republicans and nominate another progressives then US is doomed.
Even this might be our last election that matters. If republicans next year pass amnesty which they will do because voters wanted to doom this country by reelecting statist, then this US is over.

BroncosRock on August 6, 2014 at 11:14 AM

Aug 06, 2014 at 11:01 am Armyspouse
Roberts barely scrapes past Wolf in Kansas
Since when is 48% to 41% “barely scraping past?”

…yup.

The question remains: is it clickbait, or ed morrisey’s insufferable catholic tendency toward outrageous self-justification? “I TOLD you it wasn’t gonna be that close, guys!”

jaxisaneurophysicist on August 6, 2014 at 11:15 AM

Hey remember when McCain was a conservative and said things like “Just build the damn fence.” during his primary? Good times, good times.

Now McRino is 110% for amnesty. Spots on these old DIABLOs don’t really change and if they do they come right back after a win in an election.

jukin3 on August 6, 2014 at 11:15 AM

When taking into consideration the Paul Ryan-Patty Murray budget and the GOP cave on the debt ceiling, you couldn’t prove it by me.

Bitter Clinger on August 6, 2014 at 11:11 AM

Can you imagine how bad both of those would have been without TP pressure? We’re not going to win the war in one battle; fewer new laws, continued reduction of spending……one step at a time.

Tater Salad on August 6, 2014 at 11:16 AM

Senator Pat Roberts of Kansas held off the Tea Party insurgent
New York Times

All the smears that are fit to print!

Megyn Kellys Lipstick on August 6, 2014 at 11:17 AM

These old goats will all pass away over the next few years. They will be replaced, hopefully, by their Tea party challengers or other conservatives.

These old bastards are the problem with the GOP, they aren’t willing to fight the Left. They think they’re still fighting the old Democrat party and not in an existential battle with the new Social-Democrats for the future of the country.

Why won’t these old farts retire?

Charlemagne on August 6, 2014 at 11:18 AM

Roberts barely scrapes past Wolf in Kansas

Since when is 48% to 41% “barely scraping past?”
Armyspouse on August 6, 2014 at 11:01 AM

Ever since you had a three term incumbent senator win against a novice by a 7 point margin, and the not Roberts candidates have 52% of the vote. 48% of the vote in the General is not going to cut it especially in a presidential off year when voters despise both parties enough to stay home.

Brock Robamney on August 6, 2014 at 11:19 AM

Um, a miss is good as a mile.

Sherman1864 on August 6, 2014 at 11:20 AM

There was record turnout for early voting here in Tennessee. I’m praying that is a good sign for Joe Carr, although Nashville saw records also. Probably Democrats bringing in all the refugee population to vote. *sigh*

pannw on August 6, 2014 at 11:20 AM

Tea Party = Insurgent
hammas = folks

jukin3 on August 6, 2014 at 11:21 AM

John Cornyn ran his campaign here in Texas touting himself as the most conservative man to ever step foot on American soil. Even then he only got 59% of the vote against token opposition that didn’t even try.

Let’s see him actually govern the way he touted himself up to be in the GOP primary a few months ago. I doubt he will

tcufrog on August 6, 2014 at 11:21 AM

ALL on topic

Citizens of the US and all legal residents, poor, middle class and taxpayers, wake up already and rise against your gov’t. Vote them all out in Nov., from both sides.

God damn all the amnesty shills and all who’re for the Land of Men.

I hope you all burn in the hottest layer. Even that won’t be hot enough.

Nothing else will matter. ISIS, via the open borders, and the economy, in favor of the usurpers, will kill you…ISIS will do so literally.

Schadenfreude on August 6, 2014 at 11:22 AM

I am conflicted by the use of TEA party groups and TEA party members. I have been a TEA party member in my own head since it began and do not have anything to do with any group. That being said I do believe that the TEA party is having an effect on the GOP. Maybe not immediately but the GOP is having to spend big bucks to defeat TEA party candidates and that gets the TEA party’s message out there for others to see. Anyone who thought that this movement would be a massive one election takeover of the GOP is delusional. We are having an impact and all of the Karl Rove’s of the world cannot dispute that.

inspectorudy on August 6, 2014 at 11:23 AM

The Tea Party is really focusing on local elections and doing very well…….little bit at a time.

Realdemocrat1 on August 6, 2014 at 11:23 AM

I hate those posts that try to make bad news sound like excellent news. they treat the audience like children that can’t handle basic truth.

coolrepublica on August 6, 2014 at 11:07 AM

I have talked with a few fence posts in my time, but ain’t never tried to read one. Chuckle!

HonestLib on August 6, 2014 at 11:26 AM

Roberts secured 48 percent of the vote and Milton Wolf 41 percent in the four-candidate field

Were there not four candidates he would have lost. Calling that a squeaker seems fitting. Head to head as the incumbent he was a goner. It would not be the first time an incumbent arranged for a ringer to do just that.

CW20 on August 6, 2014 at 11:27 AM

The Tea Party is really focusing on local elections and doing very well…….little bit at a time.

Realdemocrat1 on August 6, 2014 at 11:23 AM

I don’t mean to make Allapundit look like an optimist, but that ‘little bit at a time’ under the current circumstances is like throwing snowballs at an avalanche.

pannw on August 6, 2014 at 11:30 AM

The Tea Party is really focusing on local elections and doing very well…….little bit at a time.

Realdemocrat1 on August 6, 2014 at 11:23 AM

So did the Ron Paulistas. In the flip of a switch from the Establishment GOP the years of work by the Ron Paul camp has been undone. The same can happen to the Tea Party at the local level.

Local Republican Politics are still governed by the RNC and are subject to their whims.

airupthere on August 6, 2014 at 11:37 AM

Tea Partiers need to stop supporting these idiot RINOS in General Elections…..

Realdemocrat1 on August 6, 2014 at 11:38 AM

I hate career politicians like Cochran, McConnell, and Roberts, and I wish we could get rid of them. We just need to run more credible candidates.

GOPRanknFile on August 6, 2014 at 11:38 AM

I argue that the Tea Party is a long-term phenomenon that is already succeeding in forcing the Republican Party and its incumbents to define themselves in terms of small-government conservatism

So true. Even when we lose we win.

HotAirian on August 6, 2014 at 11:41 AM

Frankly, I believe the Tea Party in the form of organized groups is largely ethereal and has outlived its usefulness. In converting to formal groups it has lost clout and in many cases departed from its original purpose.

Most Tea Party groups appear to now have members who seem more libertarian than any other philosophy. Frankly, that does not bode well for the purpose we, as a Republican Party, want to pursue. In fact it is institutionalizing divisiveness.

However, the “tea party” as a loosely organized movement focused on dissatisfaction with our current governmental occupants and departure from constitutional principles is far from dead. But, we will see that first hand come November, when people across the spectrum show up to vote.

At that point you can credit to the common enemy of all Americans: a complacent, overbearing government that has not served its people in a long time.

Marcus Traianus on August 6, 2014 at 10:58 AM

Very good observation.

cthemfly on August 6, 2014 at 11:46 AM

Even if Alexander manages to survive, though, it won’t be because voters have rejected the Tea Party but because the incumbent has embraced campaigned on embracing it.

This is much more of a reality based statement.

airupthere on August 6, 2014 at 10:47 AM

ReWrite™ of the Day.

Steve Eggleston on August 6, 2014 at 11:54 AM

Another one who s/b in a creche, with McCain and Cochran.

God help the land.

Schadenfreude on August 6, 2014 at 11:55 AM

I have talked with a few fence posts in my time, but ain’t never tried to read one. Chuckle!

HonestLib on August 6, 2014 at 11:26 AM

That’s an insult to fence posts ;-)

Steve Eggleston on August 6, 2014 at 11:56 AM

7 point win, barely scraping by?

nazo311 on August 6, 2014 at 11:57 AM

The Roberts campaign benefited from his fellow Kansas Establican Senator, Jerry Moran, who also just happens to be the NRSC chairman. If you’ll recall, that is the SAME NRSC that helped Thad Cochran steal the primary in Mississippi. Moran has a personal vendetta going against the TEA party.

…the ground game to oust Jerry Moran in 2016 starts TODAY…

flyovermark on August 6, 2014 at 12:06 PM

Roberts barely scrapes past Wolf in Kansas
Since when is 48% to 41% “barely scraping past?”

Armyspouse on August 6, 2014 at 11:01 AM

About the same time “the incumbent up by low double digits but looking vulnerable” became a thing, I guess.

Midas on August 6, 2014 at 12:09 PM

That said, anytime an incumbent doesn’t get an overwhelming majority of the vote, it ought to be seen as a signal of sorts, I suppose.

Midas on August 6, 2014 at 12:12 PM

A multi-decade incumbent winning by less than 10 points in a primary is indeed “scraping by”.

I guess Kansas doesn’t have primary election runoffs?

jr.ewing.78 on August 6, 2014 at 12:13 PM

52% said no to Pat Roberts.

49% said no to Thad Cochran (even with all the race baiting by his campaign).

44% said no to Lindsey Graham.

41% said no to John Cornyn.

40% said no to Mitch McConnell.

When you have significant chunks of the base like this not supporting the direction the Republicans are going, it is not a recipe for long-term success, despite how it works out in the short-term.

topdawg on August 6, 2014 at 12:14 PM

I hate those posts that try to make bad news sound like excellent news. they treat the audience like children that can’t handle basic truth.

coolrepublica on August 6, 2014 at 11:07 AM

What Pelosi, Wasserman-Schmutz and Reid do…nearly on a daily basis.

Schadenfreude on August 6, 2014 at 12:16 PM

Too bad they don’t have the same primary rules as TX. Wolf actually got a larger percentage of the primary vote than Cruz did in the 1st primary.

Wigglesworth on August 6, 2014 at 12:16 PM

A multi-decade incumbent winning by less than 10 points in a primary is indeed “scraping by”.

I guess Kansas doesn’t have primary election runoffs?

jr.ewing.78 on August 6, 2014 at 12:13 PM

Nope. Only Alabama, Arkansas, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, Oklahoma, South Carolina, South Dakota, Texas, and Vermont have runoffs.

topdawg on August 6, 2014 at 12:19 PM

Not only did the Tea Party challenger lose to the establishment incumbent in KS yesterday, but the Tea Party incumbent, Kerry Bentivolio, lost to the establishment challenger in MI-11.

GOPRanknFile on August 6, 2014 at 12:23 PM

topdawg on August 6, 2014 at 12:19 PM

I sure wish Tennessee had them, since I’m afraid the vote is going to be split between the anti-Lamar vote. There’s a millionaire, former radiologist running a pretty well financed campaign with ads on his ‘real plan’ to replace Obamacare, etc… The thing is, he’s a friend and former donor to Lamar and only seems to have jumped into the race at the absolute last minute, after Joe Carr started making some headway. Grrrr…I’m so sick of sleazy politicians!!

pannw on August 6, 2014 at 12:34 PM

Why is it that when a conservative candidate says they will not bend on CORE issues, they are deemed ultra-conservative.

What is the middle point on abortion?
Where is the middle point on a balanced budget?
etc. etc.

uber-con on August 6, 2014 at 12:35 PM

Maybe some of the long-time Washington incumbents in the Republican caucus who have quit paying attention to the voters back home will take note of the scare Roberts got, and start getting more back to representing the people of their states.

Nah

Not with the current legislative Republican leadership, who seem to see D.C. gamesmanship and grabbing more power at the federal level as the be-all end-all of US government. They are all too similar to the Democrat leadership in these respects.

s1im on August 6, 2014 at 12:37 PM

If it wasn’t for the xray story I believe Wolf would have won. He caused his own defeat.

I’ve noticed that Laura Ingraham, Mark Levin and Sarah Palin endorsed Joe Carr. None of them endorsed Wolf, likely because of the xray fiasco. So that’s what I blame on his defeat.

cat_owner on August 6, 2014 at 12:47 PM

I’ve noticed that Laura Ingraham, Mark Levin and Sarah Palin endorsed Joe Carr. None of them endorsed Wolf, likely because of the xray fiasco. So that’s what I blame on his defeat.
cat_owner on August 6, 2014 at 12:47 PM

That is incorrect. Mark did endorse Milton Wolf. The racist GOPe was against him because he is related to an African American President

Brock Robamney on August 6, 2014 at 1:06 PM

cat_owner on August 6, 2014 at 12:47 PM

Michelle Malkin has also endorsed Carr. I know one thing, Alexander’s campaign is dumping loads of money into it. I’ve had calls from Mike Huckabee, Fred Thompson, Lamar, and the granddaughters of Lamar donor turned ‘opponent’, Carr spoiler, Dr. Flinn (which I include in the pro-Lamar campaign) and the radio and TV adds are on a lot.

pannw on August 6, 2014 at 1:23 PM

Milton Wolfe was not that attractive of a candidate. I found him lacking and voted for someone I had never heard of. Wolfe hadn’t paid his state income taxes in 2002. That doesn’t cut it with me.

bopbottle on August 6, 2014 at 1:40 PM

Disappointed but not surprised. It did not help that the pro-life groups in the state endorsed Roberts. In Kansas, that can put a candidate over the goal line. And unfortunately, once again the use of negative ads worked. Roberts’ ads were very negative and his war chest could do substantial ad buys. Too bad we didn’t send him to his Virginia retirement home! I hate the thought of his staffers pulling the levers as he enters his 80s.

kansaskaye on August 6, 2014 at 2:02 PM

The point is he ‘won’.

gerrym51 on August 6, 2014 at 2:32 PM

47years! 47 freaking years! Political power to these life long pols is
like the ring to Gollum. “My precious.”

MCGIRV on August 6, 2014 at 2:41 PM

I think it’s funny how they keep writing the obituary for the Tea Party voters.

Roberts has been there practically forever, and barely scraped out a win against a challenger. And if the primary required a majority, he would have had to go to a runoff, and quite probably lost.

The GOPe is trying very, very hard to maintain a facade of invincibility, but they had to recruit an extra 30,000 Democrat votes in Mississippi to claim a Pyrrhic victory in the Republican primary.

(When the only way you win a Republican primary is to get Democrats to vote for you in the Republican primary, then you are LITERALLY a Republican In Name Only RINO, not just METAPHORICALLY.)

The more desperate they get to hang on to power, the more they reveal the Tea Party is alive alive and well.

There Goes the Neighborhood on August 6, 2014 at 2:54 PM

Biggest problem America and conservatism face is the utter stupidity of a majority of our citizens.

redware on August 6, 2014 at 5:10 PM

I’m a Kansan and Tea Party supporter, BUT:

1. Roberts never was part of the problem. You will have trouble finding a more conservative and otherwise responsible voting record. The only issue I really disagreed with Roberts on was the ethanol mandate.

2. Milton Wolf was a deeply flawed candidate. Not only did he have NO PUBLIC SERVICE EXPERIENCE WHATSOEVER, he did not exercise his right/privilege/duty to vote. IMHO, we would have ended up with another OBAMA: all talk and no action or counterproductive actions (and Obama IS Wolf’s relative)!! I looked him over thoroughly…even made a small contribution to his campaign early on…but the more I investigated, the more I became skeptical that Wolf was capable of public service in ANY capacity: definitely NOT Senate material.

So I voted for Roberts, and I think we all dodged a bullet: Wolf would have been an absolute disaster for Republicans, Tea Party, Kansans, and the nation in general.

We do need a younger replacement for Roberts as a Senator. But my preference would be someone who has demonstrated real Conservative credentials AND has the ability to serve. My ideal candidate would be someone like Kansas Rep. Yoder, who has demonstrated capabilities and is actually doing things in Washington to advance our Tea Party/Conservative ideals.

I am very disappointed that the Washington-based organizations and out-of-state PACS who supported Wolf apparently did not properly vet him: thus repeating the Obama mistake.

landlines on August 6, 2014 at 6:17 PM

47 yrs. in the DC cesspool and Kansas voters keep returning him. Those of you calling for term limits should be advocating for term limits on the idiots who keep returning these POS lifers to the cesspool. Limit their votes to two election cycles. Voting for these scumbags twice should be enough to let us all know how stooooopid you are.

Term limits are already in effect for all politicians. They cannot serve past their elected term without being reelected. So, the stooooopid voters keep extending the term limits. Calling for term limits is like saying, I’m a drug addict and can’t kick the habit, so how about passing a law making it impossible for me to not get drugs. Just quit using the drugs. Problem solved. Just quit voting over and over to keep these aholes in power and problem solved.

they lie on August 6, 2014 at 6:32 PM

Milton Wolfe was not that attractive of a candidate. I found him lacking and voted for someone I had never heard of. Wolfe hadn’t paid his state income taxes in 2002. That doesn’t cut it with me.
bopbottle on August 6, 2014 at 1:40 PM

I also heard he kicked a baby seal off an iceberg in Topeka

Brock Robamney on August 6, 2014 at 6:35 PM

landlines on August 6, 2014 at 6:17 PM

Here is the money quote; I’m a Kansan and Tea Party supporter, BUT:

Which is akin to saying, I’m not racist as all my best friends are black.

So your answer is to nominate a liberal republican who voted for ALL Obama’s nominees, who voted for most of Obama’s positions because of your claim of Milton Wolf being Obama? Hmmmmmmm

Brock Robamney on August 7, 2014 at 8:00 AM

So your answer is to nominate a liberal republican who voted for ALL Obama’s nominees, who voted for most of Obama’s positions because of your claim of Milton Wolf being Obama? Hmmmmmmm

Brock Robamney on August 7, 2014 at 8:00 AM

Even when there is no completely attractive nominee, you have to make a choice: you can’t just fail to vote (as Milton Wolf habitually did).

Characterizing Roberts as a “liberal republican” is a real stretch. By any measure, he is a conservative…with some flaws.

And your complaint about “voting for most of Obama’s nominees”: it is generally CONSERVATIVE to allow an elected president to choose his nominees, rather than blindly oppose every single one: you don’t burn the house down in order to save it.

Did Roberts make mistakes? Sure. But didn’t those pushing Wolf make a much bigger mistake by selecting someone with NO public service experience of any kind, has exercised questionable judgement in the past, who did not pay his taxes, and who didn’t vote?

landlines on August 7, 2014 at 11:19 AM

Did Roberts make mistakes? Sure. But didn’t those pushing Wolf make a much bigger mistake by selecting someone with NO public service experience of any kind, has exercised questionable judgement in the past, who did not pay his taxes, and who didn’t vote?
landlines on August 7, 2014 at 11:19 AM

No. I’m sorry if I don’t fall all over myself supporting the corrupted Seatwarmers. Apparently, using your logic, we should keep voting for these GOP fossils because they are experienced, and not make a change until they are dead

Brock Robamney on August 7, 2014 at 11:40 AM