Ebola: First case coming to America

posted at 10:01 pm on July 31, 2014 by Mary Katharine Ham

The largest outbreak in history continues unabated in West Africa. Three Americans have been infected, one of whom was the man who died upon his arrival in Nigerian megacity Lagos last week. Now, Emory University hospital in Atlanta will be taking the transfer of an Ebola patient, reportedly an American aid worker:

Emory University Hospital has been told a patient with the Ebola virus will be transferred to its hospital in Atlanta.

According to the Associated Press, the patient is an American aid worker, although the individual’s identity was not released due to privacy laws.

Emory says it has a special isolation unit to treat patients who are exposed to serious infectious diseases which is physically separate from other patient areas at the hospital.

Emory’s isolation unit is one of only four such units in the country, according to the hospital, which also said its staff are highly trained in the procedures necessary to care for the patient.

CNN reports indicate the patient coming to Atlanta is likely missionary Nancy Whitebol, but her arrival day is unknown. Both she and Dr. Kent Brantly, affiliated with Samaritan’s Purse, are still alive:

While U.S. officials have remained mum on the issue, a source told CNN that a medical charter flight left from Cartersville, Georgia, on Thursday evening.

A CNN crew saw the plane depart shortly after 5 p.m. ET. The plane matched the description provided by the source, who spoke on condition of anonymity.

It was not immediately known when the two Americans — identified by the source as Dr. Kent Brantly and Nancy Writebol — would arrive in the United States, or where the plane would land.

At least one of the two will be taken to a hospital at Emory University, near the headquarters of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta, hospital officials told CNN’s Dr. Sanjay Gupta.

The patient will be cared for in an isolation unit at the hospital that is separate from patient areas, Gupta said.

With the return of Brantly and Writebol to the United States, it will be the first time that patients diagnosed with Ebola will be known to be in the country.

Brantly and Writebol are described as being in stable-but-grave conditions, with both reportedly taking a turn for the worse overnight, according to statements released Thursday by the faith-based charity Samaritan’s Purse.

Emphasis mine. Is this something the president is reading about in the papers or is someone—anyone—making sure there’s a protocol for containing this kind of thing that’s a little more rock solid than the one that left smallpox hanging out in a minifridge for 50 years? Sure, the CDC is in Atlanta, but the CDC and the other federal agencies in charge of super-deadly infectious diseases have lost control of several deadly diseases in the past several months. I’m not a big fearmonger when it comes to public health—most of those articles about buttchugging and the cinnamon dare are nonsense—but this is a rather more serious threat and there’s plenty of recent evidence that the federal agencies in charge of such things aren’t great at being in charge of such things. Here’s hoping Emory will play point on this. It sounds as if they will, which sounds safer to me.


The Peace Corps is peacing out:

The Peace Corps said Wednesday that it was temporarily removing 340 volunteers working in Liberia, Sierra Leone and Guinea because of the virus’s spread. Two corps volunteers were placed in isolation and under observation—though they aren’t symptomatic—after coming in contact with an individual who later died of Ebola, a spokeswoman said.

Two U.S. faith-based organizations that are helping to treat Ebola patients in Liberia and have had American staff infected said they were evacuating nonessential personnel due to the spread of the virus, as well as security issues. Another U.S. citizen and a top doctor from Sierra Leone have died.

The developments highlight the risks for foreigners as well as for health staff treating Ebola patients. And they underscore the gravity of the evolving crisis in a poor corner of West Africa where government authorities and international health workers have struggled to bring the deadly outbreak under control.

Pray for Whitebol and Brantly (or send good vibes or whatever your thing is). They’re both brave people trying to serve others in the worst of conditions, and they’re clearly wonderful servants. Christlike, even, as this story shows:

An American doctor being treated for Ebola in Liberia has “taken a slight turn for the worse overnight,” according to Samaritan’s Purse, an evangelical Christian Charity based in North Carolina.

An “experimental serum” to treat the virus arrived for the two infected Americans, but there was only enough for one person, according to Samaritan’s Purse.

Dr. Kent Brantly, who noticed his Ebola symptoms and quarantined himself last week, offered the dose to the other infected American, missionary Nancy Writebol.

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Alas, there is no America anymore and borders mean nothing.

Didn’t you get the memo, MKH?

ShainS on July 31, 2014 at 10:04 PM

https://twitter.com/SamaritansPurse

Samaritan’s Purse @SamaritansPurse · 3h

Read the latest statment from Amber Brantly, wife of Dr. Kent Brantly here: http://bit.ly/1rO7xOT #Ebola

Replied to 0 times

Samaritan’s Purse @SamaritansPurse · 7h

Pray for Kent & Nancy and all those who are affected by #Ebola, and the tremendous group of doctors and nurses who are caring for them.

Replied to 0 times

Samaritan’s Purse @SamaritansPurse · 8h

Dr. Brantly received a unit of blood from a 14-year-old boy who had survived #Ebola because of Dr. Brantly’s care. http://bit.ly/1Aktriu

Replied to 0 times

Samaritan’s Purse @SamaritansPurse · 10h

Samaritan’s Purse is taking precautions that exceed the standards recommended by @CDCgov Read more here: http://bit.ly/1Aktriu

Replied to 0 times

Samaritan’s Purse @SamaritansPurse · 11h

Dr. Kent Brantly and Nancy Writebol are in stable but grave condition. Read an update of their condition here: http://bit.ly/1rM2C0A #Ebola

canopfor on July 31, 2014 at 10:07 PM

Prayers ascending for the missionaries.

AH_C on July 31, 2014 at 10:07 PM

https://twitter.com/SamaritansPurse

Samaritan’s Purse @SamaritansPurse · 3h

Read the latest statment from Amber Brantly, wife of Dr. Kent Brantly here: http://bit.ly/1rO7xOT #Ebola

Replied to 0 times

Samaritan’s Purse @SamaritansPurse · 7h

Pray for Kent & Nancy and all those who are affected by #Ebola, and the tremendous group of doctors and nurses who are caring for them.

canopfor on July 31, 2014 at 10:08 PM

As wonderful as these people are, bringing this disease to America is utterly insane.

Throat Wobbler Mangrove on July 31, 2014 at 10:08 PM

Hero doctor battling Ebola gives up the only dose of experimental serum so his colleague can have it – as his condition ‘takes a turn for the worse’
*************************************

Dr Kent Brantly, a father-of-two from Fort Worth, Texas, ensured Nancy Writebol received the experimental drug instead of him
A small amount of the serum arrived in Liberia Tuesday, the Samaritan’s Purse charity said on Wednesday
However, there was only enough for one person, said president Franklin Graham. ‘Dr. Brantly asked that it be given to Nancy Writebol’
But on Thursday charity SIM said in a statement that Mrs Writebol’s condition had worsened, despite the serum she is taking
Dr Brantly’s health also worsened overnight

By Helen Pow

Published: 19:53 GMT, 31 July 2014 | Updated: 22:38 GMT, 31 July 2014
*****

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2712477/Dr-Kent-Brantly-battling-Ebola-passes-potentially-life-saving-experimental-serum-American-colleague-it.html

canopfor on July 31, 2014 at 10:09 PM

NightMarish!!

canopfor on July 31, 2014 at 10:10 PM

What difference does it make? I mean, Ebola, scabies, chicken pox, lice, drug resistant TB……BP Agents are bringing disease home to their children.
Will obama be receiving the patients and bringing all those Homeland goodies home to his own children?
How about hugging all your new voters, Barry? How bout it?

HornetSting on July 31, 2014 at 10:13 PM

America is the best place for this patient right now. We need to be able to treat this disease, study it, diagnose it, and prevent it. we have dealt with diseases before, only when we face them head on.
smallpox, malaria, polio.

ted c on July 31, 2014 at 10:13 PM

Terrible.

For the stricken, for the country.

PattyJ on July 31, 2014 at 10:13 PM

Mark Knoller @markknoller · 9h

.@CDCgov issues Level 3 travel warning to “avoid nonessential travel to the West African nations of Guinea, Liberia, and Sierra Leone.”

Mark Knoller @markknoller · 9h

WH says @CDCgov concludes there’s “no significant risk” of Ebola outbreak in US, but reminds US healthcare workers about proper procedures.

https://twitter.com/CDCgov

canopfor on July 31, 2014 at 10:14 PM

I’ve seen this movie before. The virus mutates and gets out and the next thing you know, Zombies are everywhere.

In all seriousness, I pray for a miraculous recovery for these people.

The real danger is the wide open southern border. It’s not a matter of if some horrible disease infiltrates our border but when. Someone with Ebola may have already slipped through

HotAirian on July 31, 2014 at 10:15 PM

canopfor on July 31, 2014 at 10:09 PM

Yep, amazing. That story’s in the post.

Mary Katharine Ham on July 31, 2014 at 10:16 PM

Ugh. This sounds like a disaster in the making. Hope Emory can keep this thing in the hot zone and not let it out. I also hope they have a way of treating it with serum from survivors.

Doc Holliday on July 31, 2014 at 10:20 PM

I’m not a big fearmonger when it comes to public health—most of those articles about buttchugging and the cinnamon dare are nonsense—but this is a rather more serious threat and there’s plenty of recent evidence that the federal agencies in charge of such things aren’t great at being in charge of such things.

.
The Ebola spreading from one or two patients in extreme isolation is of little significant risk.

Having them in the U.S. and immediately accessible increases their slim chances of survival but also allows some of the best medical personnel to be able to learn from them.

If you want to worry about something?

Worry about the SCOAMF administration knowingly shipping MANY people with drug-resistant TB all across the United States.

Drug-Resistant TB

Drug-resistant TB is spread the same way that drug susceptible TB is spread. TB is spread through the air from one person to another. The TB bacteria are put into the air when a person with TB disease of the lungs or throat coughs, sneezes, speaks, or sings. People nearby may breathe in these bacteria and become infected.

PolAgnostic on July 31, 2014 at 10:22 PM

I’m not a big fearmonger when it comes to public health

I am! This is terrifying and I doubt Emory is “on top of it”. They are a very lefty school. As far as the US political class goes…they could care less if it get’s out of hand…it’s not like they are out among the people where they’ll catch anything.

This is insane…just like everything else going in this country since January 2009.

AUINSC on July 31, 2014 at 10:22 PM

Wunnerful, innit? A disease sweeping the globe that doctors have to practically wear biohaz suits to treat while our national sovereignty is disintegrating…

/SMDH

/SMoD CTU

gryphon202 on July 31, 2014 at 10:23 PM

Not to be a jerk and completely insensitive, but, from my understanding, Ebola is pretty much fatal in up to 90% of cases. There is no cure. There is no treatment. Why are we putting citizens in danger?

William Teach on July 31, 2014 at 10:23 PM

Bringing them in under these conditions is probably less of a risk than someone simply flying into the country from the region who’s been infected but doesn’t have the full-blown symptoms yet (and in that situation, this morning’s story about the government being unable to track an American jihadi/suicide-bomber-in-training when he flew back into the country is far more worrying — if they can’t keep track of this guy, odds are they don’t have a good grip on who may be coming to America from the West African outbreak areas, especially on non-direct flights).

jon1979 on July 31, 2014 at 10:23 PM

Not to be a jerk and completely insensitive, but, from my understanding, Ebola is pretty much fatal in up to 90% of cases. There is no cure. There is no treatment. Why are we putting citizens in danger?

William Teach on July 31, 2014 at 10:23 PM

It’s a viral disease. Ergo, there is almost certainly some way to either treat it or vaccinate against it. How long it takes us to discover how to treat or vaccinate against it does indeed give me pause.

gryphon202 on July 31, 2014 at 10:25 PM

I’m comfortable with this. These facilities can be buttoned up pretty tightly. I suspect the high mortality rate can be influenced dramatically by improved facilities and treatment possible here rather than in a third world country.

butch on July 31, 2014 at 10:26 PM

The CDC, the same people that misplace small pox vials. I can only hope this ends well.

Flange on July 31, 2014 at 10:26 PM

U.S. Medical Doctors over in Africa are catching this disease…these aren’t clueless people. They know the risks and take precautions…and they are still catching it.

This is nothing to just make assumptions about ‘the best and brightest’ on the job.

And the fact that the Government (in other words, Obama) is trying to keep this quiet…that should make you be afraid…very afraid.

AUINSC on July 31, 2014 at 10:27 PM

Not to be a jerk and completely insensitive, but, from my understanding, Ebola is pretty much fatal in up to 90% of cases. There is no cure. There is no treatment. Why are we putting citizens in danger?

William Teach on July 31, 2014 at 10:23 PM

I saw on the TV that this particular Ebola strain is about 60% fatal……It doesn’t keep me from seeing Dustin Hoffman with a picture of a monkey begging people to FIND THE MONKEY.
We’re all gonna die.

HornetSting on July 31, 2014 at 10:28 PM

canopfor on July 31, 2014 at 10:09 PM

Yep, amazing. That story’s in the post.

Mary Katharine Ham on July 31, 2014 at 10:16 PM

MKH: Heart breaking MKH to be sure, and ya, I’ve been following
along, with the News Feeds.(http://www.breakingnews.com/)

And its an honour to talk to you, and prayers indeed, glad
that you have posted this—:0

canopfor on July 31, 2014 at 10:28 PM

U.S. Medical Doctors over in Africa are catching this disease…these aren’t clueless people. They know the risks and take precautions…and they are still catching it.

This is nothing to just make assumptions about ‘the best and brightest’ on the job.

And the fact that the Government (in other words, Obama) is trying to keep this quiet…that should make you be afraid…very afraid.

AUINSC on July 31, 2014 at 10:27 PM

Most of those US medical doctors are acting under the assumption that if they don’t contact the bodily fluids of these people, they won’t fall pray to the little string-shaped viruses therein. Unfortunately, the fluids present in Ebola cases are not always in the form of blood-tinged puddles and half-melted internal viscera. Sometimes there is sneezing, coughing, and/or projectile vomiting involved, all of which has the practical effect of sending the virus temporarily, but fatally, airborne.

gryphon202 on July 31, 2014 at 10:30 PM

I’m comfortable with this. These facilities can be buttoned up pretty tightly. I suspect the high mortality rate can be influenced dramatically by improved facilities and treatment possible here rather than in a third world country.

butch on July 31, 2014 at 10:26 PM

After how the CDC managed to screw up with a few vials of smallpox, you should be very afraid if you’re not already.

gryphon202 on July 31, 2014 at 10:31 PM

Not to be a jerk and completely insensitive, but, from my understanding, Ebola is pretty much fatal in up to 90% of cases. There is no cure. There is no treatment

William Teach on July 31, 2014 at 10:23 PM

William Teach: I agree, it appears to be a game ender,
lets hope and pray, that it changes,mean
-while, theres this:)

Life-saving Ebola vaccine could be available in ‘two to six years’, leading experts say
***************************

Current Ebola outbreak is worst since disease was discovered in 1976
So far there have been more than 1,200 cases and 672 people have died
There is no cure and no vaccine available to treat or prevent the disease
Around four drugs are in the development stage in the U.S.
But researchers say it is difficult to generate funding to progress vaccines
First drug to prevent the vicious virus is two to six years off, scientists say

By Lizzie Parry

Published: 11:14 GMT, 31 July 2014
Updated: 15:46 GMT, 31 July 2014
*********************************

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-2711733/When-life-saving-Ebola-vaccine-available-Four-different-drugs-development-preventative-jab-years-researchers-face-funding-woes.html

canopfor on July 31, 2014 at 10:33 PM

I saw on the TV that this particular Ebola strain is about 60% fatal……It doesn’t keep me from seeing Dustin Hoffman with a picture of a monkey begging people to FIND THE MONKEY.
We’re all gonna die.

HornetSting on July 31, 2014 at 10:28 PM

More like Bruce Willis and 12 monkeys.

RickB on July 31, 2014 at 10:38 PM

canopfor on July 31, 2014 at 10:33 PM

sad story.. if America cant handle two ill people,
what will we ever do if something real breaks out?

I was following on ‘breakingnews.com as well (ty for that)
and I tried to post a link from CNN 4 hours ago..
and the darn mod didn’t like CNN…
now I see here MKH links CNN…
is there a secret for linking CNN?

going2mars on July 31, 2014 at 10:38 PM

And the fact that the Government (in other words, Obama) is trying to keep this quiet…that should make you be afraid…very afraid.

I thought the same thing. This sounds like one of his apology-to-the-world moves, I fear.

PattyJ on July 31, 2014 at 10:39 PM

I remember reading a book about this disease possibly a decade ago. After a truly horrifying description of the advance of it in a single patient, the book went on to describe a lab somewhere CONUS that used monkeys as test subjects. (it was thought monkeys were the vector involved) After everything got out of hand very hard and very fast, it was only brought under control with great difficulty. Note to tree-huggers and animal rights ninnies: Mother Nature wants to kill you. And she will. And there ain’t nothing you can do about it.

DemetriusPhalerum on July 31, 2014 at 10:39 PM

Founde it. ‘The hot zone. be afraid.

DemetriusPhalerum on July 31, 2014 at 10:42 PM

I remember reading a book about this disease possibly a decade ago. After a truly horrifying description of the advance of it in a single patient, the book went on to describe a lab somewhere CONUS that used monkeys as test subjects. (it was thought monkeys were the vector involved) After everything got out of hand very hard and very fast, it was only brought under control with great difficulty. Note to tree-huggers and animal rights ninnies: Mother Nature wants to kill you. And she will. And there ain’t nothing you can do about it.

DemetriusPhalerum on July 31, 2014 at 10:39 PM

I did a paper on that book for an English class my junior year of high school(1994-1995). What was particularly gut-wrenching about that monkey lab was that the virus turned out to be a strain lethal to the monkeys, but not to humans. And the researchers had no way of knowing that until the monkeys started running wild and infecting people. That was the discovery of the “Ebola Reston” strain, named for the city in Virginia where the lab was located.

gryphon202 on July 31, 2014 at 10:44 PM

I saw on the TV that this particular Ebola strain is about 60% fatal……It doesn’t keep me from seeing Dustin Hoffman with a picture of a monkey begging people to FIND THE MONKEY.
We’re all gonna die.

HornetSting on July 31, 2014 at 10:28 PM

More like Bruce Willis and 12 monkeys.

RickB on July 31, 2014 at 10:38 PM

Au contraire……Dustin Hoffman and Cuba Gooding Jr. were fighting a worldwide epidemic of….you guessed it, EBOLA! That dirty monkey wreaked more havoc than Meghan McCain at an all you can shovel Chinese Buffet.

HornetSting on July 31, 2014 at 10:45 PM

This scares me. I’m guessing we’re much more mobile than where it came from. If this gets out how far and how many could be affected.

wifarmboy on July 31, 2014 at 10:47 PM

Gryphon; Key phrase, ‘the researchers had no way of knowing that’. I stand by my statement; Mother Nature wants to kill you.

DemetriusPhalerum on July 31, 2014 at 10:48 PM

Some experts predict 30,000 people could become infected in west Africa

Doctors Without Borders (aka Médecins Sans Frontières [MSF]) says the threat of the disease spreading beyond western Africa, where it was first detected in Guinea in February, is frighteningly real and said it was ‘absolutely out of control’.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2711325/Weve-never-known-epidemic-Its-absolutely-control-Grave-fears-spread-Ebola-virus-Doctors-Without-Borders-admits-things-worse.html#readerCommentsCommand-message-field

The family of the American doctor was with him in Africa just before he started showing symptoms…at least that’s what they’re telling us.

xblade on July 31, 2014 at 10:52 PM

Gryphon; Key phrase, ‘the researchers had no way of knowing that’. I stand by my statement; Mother Nature wants to kill you.

DemetriusPhalerum on July 31, 2014 at 10:48 PM

I absolutely agree. There was nothing contributing to the discovery of Ebola Reston except dumb, blind luck. And there is every reason to believe that the strain spreading in Africa now is Ebola Zaire, which is far more lethal and far more infectious. It can survive in the fluids of corpses for weeks after their death and is well over 90% lethal. It’s wiped out entire villages along the Zaire tributary of the Congo River. That’s how it was discovered by the WHO in 1976 in the first place.

gryphon202 on July 31, 2014 at 10:53 PM

elect an african president, get an african disease..

/typical repuglican

ThisIsYourBrainOnKoch on July 31, 2014 at 10:54 PM

Sure, they are isolated in the hospital here, but what about the airport there and the plane and the road in from the airport here?

PattyJ on July 31, 2014 at 10:54 PM

Gryphon; Key phrase, ‘the researchers had no way of knowing that’. I stand by my statement; Mother Nature wants to kill you.

DemetriusPhalerum on July 31, 2014 at 10:48 PM

And I’ll clarify my thoughts on this by saying I don’t find it comforting that the researchers in Reston got lucky. That just scares me even more.

gryphon202 on July 31, 2014 at 10:54 PM

After how the CDC managed to screw up with a few vials of smallpox, you should be very afraid if you’re not already.

gryphon202 on July 31, 2014 at 10:31 PM

Naw, I’ve worked in BL3 and 4 level diagnostic virology labs at the NADL in Ames and other BL3 level labs in animal commercial vaccine development. I’m afraid of many government agencies, but, overall, the CDC is a pretty good outfit.

butch on July 31, 2014 at 10:55 PM

Kocky; I don’t think viruses care who is president. I dunno.

DemetriusPhalerum on July 31, 2014 at 10:56 PM

An Ebola thought experiment.

https://storify.com/GaltsGirl/rick-wilson-tells-twitter-a-story

xblade on July 31, 2014 at 10:56 PM

Sure, they are isolated in the hospital here, but what about the airport there and the plane and the road in from the airport here?

PattyJ on July 31, 2014 at 10:54 PM

I’m sure precautions will be taken. Ebola-class filoviruses are considered a level 4 biohazard, which means they can not be contacted except under total biological isolation. It’s something akin to the clean room protocols that solid rocket boosters and silicon microchips have to be assembled in, almost like being in a space capsule — it’s that tight.

That still leaves the question, of course, is it enough? I don’t know. Hug your kids extra tight tonight.

gryphon202 on July 31, 2014 at 10:58 PM

Gryphon; my memory of the tale is sketchy, but I think luck had less to do with it than panic. See ‘plague, Medieval’.

DemetriusPhalerum on July 31, 2014 at 10:59 PM

Liberals will always reveal their racism.

HornetSting on July 31, 2014 at 10:59 PM

Naw, I’ve worked in BL3 and 4 level diagnostic virology labs at the NADL in Ames and other BL3 level labs in animal commercial vaccine development. I’m afraid of many government agencies, but, overall, the CDC is a pretty good outfit.

butch on July 31, 2014 at 10:55 PM

You know the lab in Reston that let those Macaques escape was a lvl 4 biocontainment lab, right? And the flipping monkeys escaped into the greater Washington DC area. Do you know what could would have happened had those monkeys been carrying Ebola Zaire? Or do you really have no clue how stupid-lucky those researchers were they didn’t end up killing tens of thousands of individuals inside the DC beltway?

gryphon202 on July 31, 2014 at 11:00 PM

Gryphon; my memory of the tale is sketchy, but I think luck had less to do with it than panic. See ‘plague, Medieval’.

DemetriusPhalerum on July 31, 2014 at 10:59 PM

It was thought those monkeys were carrying Ebola Zaire. They were not. Reston was a lvl 4 biocontainment lab. The luck came in when it turned out that the strain of filovirus those monkeys were carrying isn’t infectious to humans. Needless to say, infecting humans with the virus to see if it was a different strain would have been grossly unethical. They got lucky. But yes, they did panic.

gryphon202 on July 31, 2014 at 11:02 PM

Thanks, Gryphon. Biochemistry etc. isn’t my forte, so maybe I’m a might bit skittish about such things. Nevertheless, I am concerned. Deeply concerned.

DemetriusPhalerum on July 31, 2014 at 11:08 PM

At least we are being told about this. What is being done about the people and the diseases they carry at the borders is all hush hush. Why? The people do not have a right to know about their new neighbors and any health conditions that could affect their families? If a business snuck a hazardous waste treatment facility into a minority community in the middle of the night with no notice, the left would be up in arms but Dem politicians treat drug resistant TB at the border like its a nothing burger.

KW64 on July 31, 2014 at 11:13 PM

Thanks, Gryphon. Biochemistry etc. isn’t my forte, so maybe I’m a might bit skittish about such things. Nevertheless, I am concerned. Deeply concerned.

DemetriusPhalerum on July 31, 2014 at 11:08 PM

My paper was written 20 years ago, but it left a big impression on me because I spent quite a bit of time researching it and the presentation I had to give in class to go along with it.

Medical science is actually full of stupid-lucky discoveries. We wouldn’t have sulpha or penicillin without that sort of thing. As far as I know, most of them don’t have the potential to kill multiple thousands of people in major American urban centers, though.

gryphon202 on July 31, 2014 at 11:15 PM

KW64;l what worries me is not the political split but the underlying reasons for this kind of thing. I am reminded of a Latin phrase which I can’t attribute: Cui Bono?

DemetriusPhalerum on July 31, 2014 at 11:18 PM

KW64;l what worries me is not the political split but the underlying reasons for this kind of thing. I am reminded of a Latin phrase which I can’t attribute: Cui Bono?

DemetriusPhalerum on July 31, 2014 at 11:18 PM

I’ve heard that phrase in legal context before. Cui bono = who benefits?

gryphon202 on July 31, 2014 at 11:19 PM

Zakly, Gryphon. In this case (disease ridden invaders) who is supposed to be winning here? How is this supposed to be turned into a winning strategy? Who benefits?

DemetriusPhalerum on July 31, 2014 at 11:21 PM

Brace for Ebolanado!

Mike Honcho on July 31, 2014 at 11:31 PM

I am really not sure why this article is a sensationalist as MKH made it. I think it might be from ignorance. Ebola is a pretty benign disease under US isolation protocols.

I might be the most qualified person here to talk about this. I have an MD/Phd with my PhD in Biochemistry and an undergrad degree in Microbiology. I also grew up in Nigeria, so I know quite a bit about infection control in many African countries, which is pretty much non-existent.

The reason why this infection is spreading so fast in Africa is because of the poor medical facilities. There are no controls on hospitals and isolation is pretty non-existent except at major Govt hospitals which most of the population use.

Ebola is not spread through the air. It’s spread through direct contact with bodily fluids or surfaces where the virus in on. That means that it is actually quite easy to control in a safe, well regulated environment like you have in US hospitals. The bad thing is there is no cure for Ebola, so that makes it dangerous. However, TB can actually be said to be more infectious than Ebola, since it is air-borne, and we handle that everyday at the hospital. If we can handle TB, then we can definitely handle Ebola.

I think that the best place for these individuals is in the US at this time. Ebola causes hemorrhagic fever, which basically means that you bleed out. The most important things they need is replacement of fluids – including blood, and other blood products. These things are not easy to get in the middle of Liberia, especially in the middle of an epidemic.

I know that people are worried, but it’s ok to be worried about the unknown. However, US hospitals handle worse situations than this everyday and any 3rd yr medical student in the US, is already very well trained in basic infection control protocols.

Chudi on July 31, 2014 at 11:31 PM

As wonderful as these people are, bringing this disease to America is utterly insane.

Throat Wobbler Mangrove on July 31, 2014 at 10:08 PM

.
I’d be partial to some off-shore facility. There’s got to be enough suitable islands that are within our territorial waters, for such a thing.

listens2glenn on July 31, 2014 at 11:34 PM

And Chudi comes along and basically answers my question. Nothing to see here. These are not the droids you’re looking for. Don’t worry, be happy.

DemetriusPhalerum on July 31, 2014 at 11:35 PM

And Chudi comes along and basically answers my question. Nothing to see here. These are not the droids you’re looking for. Don’t worry, be happy.

DemetriusPhalerum on July 31, 2014 at 11:35 PM

Just say racist rock and watch him spiral off his axis.

HornetSting on July 31, 2014 at 11:42 PM

Ebola is a pretty benign disease

Except when you contract it.

Oil Can on July 31, 2014 at 11:42 PM

Alas, there is no America anymore and borders mean nothing.

Didn’t you get the memo, MKH?

ShainS on July 31, 2014 at 10:04 PM

.
That’s been the ultimate goal, all along.

listens2glenn on July 31, 2014 at 11:44 PM

I am really not sure why this article is a sensationalist as MKH made it. I think it might be from ignorance. Ebola is a pretty benign disease under US isolation protocols.

Under “US isolation protocols,” four crab eating macaques escaped from a Reston, VA lvl 4 isolation lab that were thought to have the potential to bring the most infectious and deadly virus right into the Washington DC Beltway. There is nothing sensationalist about this. It is the truth. And I find your faith in the United States government’s ability to handle something like this equally disturbing, given all the reasons you should have to mistrust them in this and many other matters.

I might be the most qualified person here to talk about this. I have an MD/Phd with my PhD in Biochemistry and an undergrad degree in Microbiology. I also grew up in Nigeria, so I know quite a bit about infection control in many African countries, which is pretty much non-existent.

I’ll say it again: As soon as those crab eating macaques made it out the door of that lab, any “infection control” in place at the lab in Reston mattered precisely DICK.

The reason why this infection is spreading so fast in Africa is because of the poor medical facilities. There are no controls on hospitals and isolation is pretty non-existent except at major Govt hospitals which most of the population use.

Ebola is not spread through the air. It’s spread through direct contact with bodily fluids or surfaces where the virus in on. That means that it is actually quite easy to control in a safe, well regulated environment like you have in US hospitals. The bad thing is there is no cure for Ebola, so that makes it dangerous. However, TB can actually be said to be more infectious than Ebola, since it is air-borne, and we handle that everyday at the hospital. If we can handle TB, then we can definitely handle Ebola.

I think that the best place for these individuals is in the US at this time. Ebola causes hemorrhagic fever, which basically means that you bleed out. The most important things they need is replacement of fluids – including blood, and other blood products. These things are not easy to get in the middle of Liberia, especially in the middle of an epidemic.

I know that people are worried, but it’s ok to be worried about the unknown. However, US hospitals handle worse situations than this everyday and any 3rd yr medical student in the US, is already very well trained in basic infection control protocols.

Chudi on July 31, 2014 at 11:31 PM

I can’t find a lot of falsehood in what you’ve said as far as it goes, though it does completely ignore episodes such as the CDC’s recent discovery of smallpox vials that it had lost for several decades (no exaggeration or sensationalism there either), as well as the more germane loss in 1989 of crab eating macaques that were thought to harbor a virulent and deadly-to-humans strain of Ebolavirus.

I have faith that all due precaution will be taken. Unfortunately that precaution will be overseen by the CDC, an arm of our federal government. And I have no more faith in FedGov today than I did yesterday, ladies and gentlemen.

gryphon202 on July 31, 2014 at 11:44 PM

I mean could they have just treated him on a isolated island…just in case? Why a major urban area.

Do any of these scientists watch sci-fi movies? Or does everyone now have the all knowing Obama attitude.

Oil Can on July 31, 2014 at 11:49 PM

Oil Can on July 31, 2014 at 11:42 PM

Yes, if you contract Ebola, your chances of dying are 90% IN AFRICA. That’s my point. The fact that 10% survive with the facilities available in those area tell you all you need to know. If Ebola happened in the US, I can safely say that you have to spin those figures around. I speak from experience after having experienced medical care in both areas.

DemetriusPhalerum on July 31, 2014 at 11:35 PM

There is really nothing to see. It’s that simple. Not saying you shouldn’t be worried, but there is no reason for alarm.

gryphon202 on July 31, 2014 at 11:44 PM

I used to work in a lab. The CDC messed up, but the fact that the small pox was viable didn’t mean that it was going to escape into the atmosphere. Viable most likely meant that when they cultured it, it grew. That’s all it meant. During my PhD yrs when I worked in the lab, there were many things that were left in the freezer. In fact my samples are still in the freezer right now, but it’s all catalogued. The difference is that the CDC should have been more careful with documentation. Those samples were left many yrs ago, and use of computers was not widespread. I can assure you that things like that most likely won’t happen again in the future. Can it happen, sure cus people make mistakes. But it’s not the norm.

The doctors that work in the CDC are professionals and are some of the smartest people in the world. The bureaucrats suck, but the actual Drs in the trenches are awesome. It’s the same with the VA.

Chudi on July 31, 2014 at 11:59 PM

I mean could they have just treated him on a isolated island…just in case? Why a major urban area.

Do any of these scientists watch sci-fi movies? Or does everyone now have the all knowing Obama attitude.

Oil Can on July 31, 2014 at 11:49 PM

Because the isolated island doesn’t have the right facilities. Do you know how many diseases are being contained in your local hospital? I know you are speaking from ignorance, which is ok. Like I said, it’s ok to be worried, but there is no cause for alarm.

If you know the things that happen every single day in your local hospital or medical center, I think you will probably move to an isolated island then. Do you know the number of times we have had to call people at home and tell them, they have infectious diseases like TB? Do you know how many people in that hospital you visit everyday are in isolation. If you start freaking out about everything, then you will go crazy.

There is no cause for alarm.

Chudi on August 1, 2014 at 12:04 AM

They are not being brought over just to receive the same supportive care here. This is about experimental treatment.

DisneyFan on August 1, 2014 at 12:05 AM

Chudi, peanut. I do know how many diseases are contained in my hospital, one of the best in my area. I’ve had two open hearts and I’m more worried about the hospital stay than I am the surgery. But I getcha. Nothing to see here. Move along.

DemetriusPhalerum on August 1, 2014 at 12:09 AM

Because the isolated island doesn’t have the right facilities. Do you know how many diseases are being contained in your local hospital? I know you are speaking from ignorance, which is ok. Like I said, it’s ok to be worried, but there is no cause for alarm.

If you know the things that happen every single day in your local hospital or medical center, I think you will probably move to an isolated island then. Do you know the number of times we have had to call people at home and tell them, they have infectious diseases like TB? Do you know how many people in that hospital you visit everyday are in isolation. If you start freaking out about everything, then you will go crazy.

There is no cause for alarm.

Chudi on August 1, 2014 at 12:04 AM

The federal government of the United States of America, under the auspices of the Federal Center for Disease Control [CDC] will be handling oversight of all biolhazard protocol in this matter. I think many of my fellow commenters here will agree with me that alone is plenty of cause for alarm.

gryphon202 on August 1, 2014 at 12:16 AM

They are not being brought over just to receive the same supportive care here. This is about experimental treatment.

DisneyFan on August 1, 2014 at 12:05 AM

.
You don’t suppose our government is trying to get samples of bodily fluids from these patients, for the purpose of “weaponizing” this virus, do you ?

listens2glenn on August 1, 2014 at 12:17 AM

Chudi, peanut. I do know how many diseases are contained in my hospital, one of the best in my area. I’ve had two open hearts and I’m more worried about the hospital stay than I am the surgery. But I getcha. Nothing to see here. Move along.

DemetriusPhalerum on August 1, 2014 at 12:09 AM

Yeah. Ebola is Level 4. For NO apparent reason. /

HornetSting on August 1, 2014 at 12:17 AM

Yeah. Ebola is Level 4. For NO apparent reason. /

HornetSting on August 1, 2014 at 12:17 AM

I have tried to ignore you because I prefer not to talk to ignoramuses.

I never said Ebola was not dangerous, I said under US infection controls it is benign. Those are 2 different things. The difference between us is that I am qualified to speak about this, unlike you.

Chudi on August 1, 2014 at 12:30 AM

No your not, Chudi. ‘I am smarter than you’ Is not a logical argument.

DemetriusPhalerum on August 1, 2014 at 12:32 AM

Yeah. Ebola is Level 4. For NO apparent reason. /

HornetSting on August 1, 2014 at 12:17 AM

I have tried to ignore you because I prefer not to talk to ignoramuses.

I never said Ebola was not dangerous, I said under US infection controls it is benign. Those are 2 different things. The difference between us is that I am qualified to speak about this, unlike you.

Chudi on August 1, 2014 at 12:30 AM

Chudi is the smartest man in any room. All hail Chudi!
The only thing you are qualified to speak about is your psychosis and the racial relations of Perry’s rock.

You have much more faith in the infectious controls here…..under Obama’s banana republic, I wouldn’t trust the experts with a cold.

HornetSting on August 1, 2014 at 12:37 AM

@ DemetriusPhalerum: I didn’t say i was smarter than anybody, I said I was more qualified…two different things. I am not in the financial sector, so when the financial crisis hit, I wouldn’t go around and argue with people in that field about the causes or the solutions.

Everybody is different. Unless you tell me you have the same experience in this field that I do, then yes, I am more qualified to talk about it than you. It doesn’t mean I am smarter, it means I am more qualified.

I called HornetSting an ignoramus, because he is. Look at the first comment he made on this thread and see why I called him an ignoramus.

Chudi on August 1, 2014 at 12:44 AM

Sure, they are isolated in the hospital here, but what about the airport there and the plane and the road in from the airport here?

PattyJ on July 31, 2014 at 10:54 PM

Not really a concern because of the way they’ll be transported. I mean, sure, in the very unlikely event that there were a plane or vehicle accident and some witness who didn’t know what was going on decided to rescue the body, then there would be a possibility of that person getting the virus, but that person would immediately be isolated, so no risk of it becoming a problem that way.

If there is an f-up with this, it will be the rather boring scenario of some idiot failing to follow precautions. I think that’s unlikely in this particular case. If/when Ebola actually becomes an issue in the US, it will probably be a result of someone with Ebola making his way over on a regular flight.

DisneyFan on August 1, 2014 at 12:45 AM

No they’re not ,Chudi. That you can’t see that proves my, our point.

DemetriusPhalerum on August 1, 2014 at 12:48 AM

I called HornetSting an ignoramus, because he is. Look at the first comment he made on this thread and see why I called him an ignoramus.

Chudi on August 1, 2014 at 12:44 AM

That’s she. And, if you cannot understand sarcasm, well, maybe playing around with level 4 pathogens like they are lifesavers isn’t your only problem.
That, and being a douchenozzle.

HornetSting on August 1, 2014 at 12:50 AM

There is no cause for alarm.

Chudi on August 1, 2014 at 12:04 AM

John: When they opened Disney Land in 1956, nothing worked.

Ian: Yeah but John, if the Pirates of the Caribbean breaks down, the pirates don’t eat the tourists.

And if you are wrong and they can’t contain this thing. You have released a 60% to 90% mortality rate virus (worse then the black death)on to the US.

Is treating one person worth all this risk, especially with so many unknowns.

Plus, I have zero confidence in this government. zero.

Oil Can on August 1, 2014 at 12:50 AM

There is no cause for alarm.

Chudi on August 1, 2014 at 12:04 AM

John: When they opened Disney Land in 1956, nothing worked.

Ian: Yeah but John, if the Pirates of the Caribbean breaks down, the pirates don’t eat the tourists.

And if you are wrong and they can’t contain this thing. You have released a 60% to 90% mortality rate virus (worse then the black death)on to the US.

Is treating one person worth all this risk, especially with so many unknowns.

Plus, I have zero confidence in this government. zero.

Oil Can on August 1, 2014 at 12:50 AM

Love that. I keep seeing Kevin Bacon screaming “Remain calm! All is well!”

HornetSting on August 1, 2014 at 12:55 AM

And if you are wrong and they can’t contain this thing. You have released a 60% to 90% mortality rate virus (worse then the black death)on to the US.

Is treating one person worth all this risk, especially with so many unknowns.

Plus, I have zero confidence in this government. zero.

Oil Can on August 1, 2014 at 12:50 AM

Like I said before, the risk of having an outbreak in the US is very minimal. Can there be cases, yes…but an outbreak, very minimal. That’s because we have awesome infection controls. As a Dr. I don’t think the way you think. If I think that way, then I cannot go to work everyday. I can’t worry about the 0.1% of the time that things can go wrong.

I think treating Dr. Kent Brantly is worth the risk. This guy is 33 yrs old and he is spending his time in Liberia treating sick and poor people. He is a Christian missionary. I am 36 yrs old and I cannot imagine leaving my family and moving back to Nigeria. He is however doing it, and giving up all the money he can make by working here in the US.

Even though he was sick, he still gave the experimental serum sent from the US to the other missionary. Do you know why, it’s because he is a Dr and the oath he took the day he finished medical school.

This guy should not be there, but he is. I think he deserves every chance in the world. I bet that if you go to Atlanta and asked all the nurses and Drs who will take care of him, they tell you that it is worth it.

Chudi on August 1, 2014 at 12:59 AM

Oops, sorry Hornet. I didn’t mean to speak for you. It’s just that some p*ssant Pf’inhD can’t process that a Navy vet might have seen more of Africa than he has, that said vet might have more letters after his name than he can keep up with, and has more experience with American hospitals and medical procedures than he ever will kinda sets me off. Maybe he should apply for membersghip with the Minestry of Funny Walks. Although he might not qualify.

DemetriusPhalerum on August 1, 2014 at 1:00 AM

Oops, sorry Hornet. I didn’t mean to speak for you. It’s just that some p*ssant Pf’inhD can’t process that a Navy vet might have seen more of Africa than he has, that said vet might have more letters after his name than he can keep up with, and has more experience with American hospitals and medical procedures than he ever will kinda sets me off. Maybe he should apply for membersghip with the Minestry of Funny Walks. Although he might not qualify.

DemetriusPhalerum on August 1, 2014 at 1:00 AM

No sorry needed. Impressive field work. I think Obama Jr’s head might explode. :-)

HornetSting on August 1, 2014 at 1:04 AM

I forgot to mention something, I have zero confidence in Obama. I think he is an emptysuit, and this opinion is well documented on these pages.

This situation is however not about Obama and government. This is medicine. This is being handled by Drs, who are smarter than I will ever be. I have confidence in the Doctors.

Chudi on August 1, 2014 at 1:05 AM

Then you’re more of an idjit than I thought. Doctors are people, not gods.

DemetriusPhalerum on August 1, 2014 at 1:07 AM

Oops, sorry Hornet. I didn’t mean to speak for you. It’s just that some p*ssant Pf’inhD can’t process that a Navy vet might have seen more of Africa than he has, that said vet might have more letters after his name than he can keep up with, and has more experience with American hospitals and medical procedures than he ever will kinda sets me off. Maybe he should apply for membersghip with the Minestry of Funny Walks. Although he might not qualify.

DemetriusPhalerum on August 1, 2014 at 1:00 AM

It’s MD/PhD. If you are going to insult me, at least get it correct. The fact that you are a Navy vet and has seen the world doesn’t mean you are qualified to talk about Ebola. I respect your service and salute the bravery. I am not that brave.

But with all due respect, i am more qualified to speak about Ebola virus and infectious diseases than you. That’s just a fact. If we are talking about war and peace and our policy in the middle east, you are more qualified than I am. But in matters of medicine, I am more qualified. That’s not an insult, those are facts.

Chudi on August 1, 2014 at 1:09 AM

Oops, sorry Hornet. I didn’t mean to speak for you. It’s just that some p*ssant Pf’inhD can’t process that a Navy vet might have seen more of Africa than he has, that said vet might have more letters after his name than he can keep up with, and has more experience with American hospitals and medical procedures than he ever will kinda sets me off. Maybe he should apply for membersghip with the Minestry of Funny Walks. Although he might not qualify.

DemetriusPhalerum on August 1, 2014 at 1:00 AM

It’s MD/PhD. If you are going to insult me, at least get it correct. The fact that you are a Navy vet and has seen the world doesn’t mean you are qualified to talk about Ebola. I respect your service and salute the bravery. I am not that brave.

But with all due respect, i am more qualified to speak about Ebola virus and infectious diseases than you. That’s just a fact. If we are talking about war and peace and our policy in the middle east, you are more qualified than I am. But in matters of medicine, I am more qualified. That’s not an insult, those are facts.

Chudi on August 1, 2014 at 1:09 AM

Dr/PhD Chudi, I have a question. Have you ever treated a patient infected with the Ebola virus?

HornetSting on August 1, 2014 at 1:11 AM

You don’t suppose our government is trying to get samples of bodily fluids from these patients, for the purpose of “weaponizing” this virus, do you ?

listens2glenn on August 1, 2014 at 12:17 AM

No, I don’t.

That’s not to say that I deny the fact that our government has done research involving bio warfare. It most certainly has. But these people are not being brought over as part of a weaponization plot.

DisneyFan on August 1, 2014 at 1:12 AM

Horse shit and frogs balls, Chudi. ‘I am smarter than you’ is not an argument. Wait! I said that before and you ignored it. Hmmmm. Maybe you’re not smarter than me.

DemetriusPhalerum on August 1, 2014 at 1:13 AM

Then you’re more of an idjit than I thought. Doctors are people, not gods.

DemetriusPhalerum on August 1, 2014 at 1:07 AM

I never said Doctors were gods. Not sure why you choose to misrepresent my words. Quote me correctly.

The fact is that Drs and nurses are more likely to die from infectious diseases than the general public at large, because we are more on the front line. I spoke about Dr. Brantly specifically because he is a Christian missionary who was working with poor people. That’s why I spoke about him. He deserves everything we can do for him.

Chudi on August 1, 2014 at 1:14 AM

Chudi @ 1:14 AM. Non sequitur. And yes you did.

DemetriusPhalerum on August 1, 2014 at 1:16 AM

Horse shit and frogs balls, Chudi. ‘I am smarter than you’ is not an argument. Wait! I said that before and you ignored it. Hmmmm. Maybe you’re not smarter than me.

DemetriusPhalerum on August 1, 2014 at 1:13 AM

Maybe you should read more, before you write. It’s like you insist on being insulted, when I have gone out of my way not to insult you. Really don’t get what your deal is…

Chudi on August 1, 2014 at 1:17 AM

I think it’s time to go to bed. To the people who insist on jumping out of the window, even though there is no fire inside the house…please go ahead.

Like I said before, It’s ok to be worried, but there is no cause for alarm.

Chudi on August 1, 2014 at 1:19 AM

Bye. Don’t let the door hit ya where the Good Lord split ya. And if it makes you feel better, I won’t bother with you again.

DemetriusPhalerum on August 1, 2014 at 1:21 AM

Dr/PhD Chudi, I have another question. Are you versed in the infectious control protocols that will be in place for Dr. Brantly from West Africa to Emory in Atlanta, Georgia, USA?
Follow up question. Does deserving everything we can do for Dr. Brantly include introducing a level four pathogen into the United States within a patient for the first time and possibly losing control of those infectious controls you tout, infecting American citizens?

HornetSting on August 1, 2014 at 1:22 AM

Like I said before, It’s ok to be worried, but there is no cause for alarm.

Chudi on August 1, 2014 at 1:19 AM

Like I said before, that our federal government will be handling this is all the cause for alarm I need.

gryphon202 on August 1, 2014 at 1:23 AM

Dr/PhD Chudi, I have another question. Are you versed in the infectious control protocols that will be in place for Dr. Brantly from West Africa to Emory in Atlanta, Georgia, USA?
Follow up question. Does deserving everything we can do for Dr. Brantly include introducing a level four pathogen into the United States within a patient for the first time and possibly losing control of those infectious controls you tout, infecting American citizens?

HornetSting on August 1, 2014 at 1:22 AM

Remember Reston!

/Battlecry

gryphon202 on August 1, 2014 at 1:24 AM

Bye. Don’t let the door hit ya where the Good Lord split ya. And if it makes you feel better, I won’t bother with you again.

DemetriusPhalerum on August 1, 2014 at 1:21 AM

LMAO….A Dr/PhD so obsessed with a racist rock last primary cycle that it became insanely comical. I think I’ll stick to my own doctor. He’s only tried to kill me once. :-)

HornetSting on August 1, 2014 at 1:27 AM

Well, given that Chudi is absolutely insisting on argumentum ad assertum based on his doctorates that we have no way of confirming the truth of, either he is choosing to ignore the Reston incident or he is remaining willfully ignorant of it despite it being brought up on this thread several times. One way or the other, it speaks ill of his ethics or intelligence, perhaps both, given that there most certainly is cause for alarm as any rational person can see.

gryphon202 on August 1, 2014 at 1:28 AM

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