American health officials don’t want you to worry about the worst Ebola outbreak ever

posted at 6:41 pm on July 29, 2014 by Noah Rothman

In West Africa, the worst recorded outbreak of the horrifying filovirus Ebola continues its borderless assault on the local population unabated. There is no vaccine or antivirus which can treat this disease, and its effects on the human body are graphic, rapid, and nightmarish.

Already, two Americans have been confirmed as carriers of the disease which officials estimate kills 60 percent of those it infects. One of those Ebola victims was confirmed as Patrick Sawyer, an American citizen working for the Liberian government who developed symptoms of the disease after having boarded a plane bound for his home in Minnesota.

American officials are, however, advising Americans to be alert but to not fret excessively over the outbreak.

“While the Ebola virus could potentially be transported by travelers to another country by a plane ride, according to officials at the CDC, the actual chance of this developing in a serious public health risk to those living in the US is small,” Dr. Robert Glatter wrote in Forbes on Tuesday.

While the virus incubates from 2-21 days, it’s important to know that only those who are symptomatic–generally after 8-9 days–having fever along with diarrhea, vomiting and potentially a hemorrhagic rash can transmit the virus to others.

As a result, if someone on a plane with active symptoms–including vomiting and diarrhea –soils a restroom, another person who is not aware could theoretically touch a contaminated area, and then acquire the virus.

That said, it’s important to know that the majority of those who have become infected with the Ebola virus have been primarily healthcare workers in close contact with patients as well as family members caring for sick family members. In addition, the risk of transmission from family members touching an infected corpse prior to burial represents another potential mode of transmission.

American officials told Glatter that medical personnel in the U.S. are on high alert for anyone displaying signs associated with Ebola infection.

The U.S. government has no travel restrictions to West Africa in place, though the Centers for Disease Control issued a mid-level advisory to health workers traveling to the region.

With at least 672 dead in a series of West African country, the current outbreak is the longest running and most extensive since the disease was discovered in 1976.


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Nothing to see here…move along…

workingclass artist on July 29, 2014 at 6:46 PM

A new mutant strain turns people into zombies.

Get ready.

DarkCurrent on July 29, 2014 at 6:48 PM

Democrats scramble to find ways to protect illegal aliens.

When asked about American citizens a spokesperson replied: Who?

darwin on July 29, 2014 at 6:49 PM

Good writeup on symptoms etc. at this link…

“Men who have recovered from the disease, can still spread the virus to their partner through their semen for seven weeks after recovery….”

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-2709686/From-symptoms-common-cold-bleeding-ears-eyes-What-happens-infected-Ebola-virus.html#ixzz38ttc5Wzl
Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook

workingclass artist on July 29, 2014 at 6:49 PM

“While the Ebola virus could potentially be transported by travelers to another country by a plane ride, according to officials at the CDC, the actual chance of this developing in a serious public health risk to those living in the US is small,” Dr. Robert Glatter wrote in Forbes on Tuesday.

It’s out of control due to incompetence and bureaucratic mismanagement. What’s to worry! That can’t happen here!

We are so epically screwed.

dogsoldier on July 29, 2014 at 6:51 PM

Coming to a border near you!

Child In Time on July 29, 2014 at 6:55 PM

While the Ebola virus could potentially be transported by travelers to another country by a plane ride, according to officials at the CDC, the actual chance of this developing in a serious public health risk to those living in the US is small

The virus hitching a ride on one of the thousands of innocent, little, facial-haired, waifs named Mohammed marching across the southern border on the other hand…..

CurtZHP on July 29, 2014 at 6:57 PM

American officials are, however, advising Americans to be alert but to not fret excessively over the outbreak.

Isn’t that part of the set up for every single one of those pandemic movies on cable networks?

Happy Nomad on July 29, 2014 at 6:57 PM

Nothing to worry about …

Ebola: ‘It’s close, it’s at our front door’

http://www.wnd.com/2014/07/ebola-its-close-its-at-our-front-door/

Ebola is just a plane ride away (or a taxpayer-funded bus ride away, for one of obama’s illegals) from the USA.

Pork-Chop on July 29, 2014 at 6:58 PM

One of those Ebola victims was confirmed as Patrick Sawyer, an American citizen working for the Liberian government who developed symptoms of the disease after having boarded a plane bound for his home in Minnesota.

Let that sink in. We dodged a serious bullet there.

xblade on July 29, 2014 at 7:00 PM

You get the feeling we’re being prepped for some very bad news.

I can see where this coming in over the border would be a big game-changer, but you’d think the Feds would be a tad less obvious.

formwiz on July 29, 2014 at 7:02 PM

The U.S. government has no travel restrictions to West Africa in place, though the Centers for Disease Control issued a mid-level advisory to health workers traveling to the region.

America: the only country in the world whose policy is to import disease and export jobs

Stoic Patriot on July 29, 2014 at 7:05 PM

Sounds like carriers are dead soon after they get it has a high fatality rate.

sorrowen on July 29, 2014 at 7:09 PM

The release of the latest Planet Of The Apes film is, in a macabre sense, well-timed.

(We saw it yesterday)

itsnotaboutme on July 29, 2014 at 7:10 PM

COULD EBOLA SNEAK ACROSS U.S. BORDER?

Africans passing through Mexico raise new flags in ‘out of control’ outbreak

http://www.wnd.com/2014/07/could-ebola-sneak-across-u-s-border/

Pork-Chop on July 29, 2014 at 7:10 PM

Awesome! As a first responder, this news just makes me ecstatic!!

ManWithNoName on July 29, 2014 at 7:16 PM

They don’t want anything to detract from worrying about global warming.

VorDaj on July 29, 2014 at 7:19 PM

Let that sink in. We dodged a serious bullet there.

xblade on July 29, 2014 at 7:00 PM

Meh, it’s Minnesota. The virus would be bored to death before it did any harm. /

Seriously, there are other health threats that are far more scary. The ones that do serious damage to the food supply for example.

Happy Nomad on July 29, 2014 at 7:20 PM

can’t be any worse than Eboma..

hillsoftx on July 29, 2014 at 7:21 PM

This is like some “Boy Who Cried Wolf” scenario where the government has overhyped so many things that when they do put out facts, like this isn’t that big a risk to us, no one believes them.

The combined population total of Sierra Leone, Guinea, and Liberia is over 20 million, there have been about 1200 cases including in extremely dense population areas like Conarky. Were Ebola as easily transmitted as being hyped, the incidence would be much higher.

The aggregate case fatality rate for all outbreaks in the last 38 years (it was first recognized in 1976) is about 60%, and would be lower were there better diagnostic and treatment (supportive care) available. This outbreak may be the largest, but it is still only about 2600 deaths from 4400 cases in 38 years

Naegleria meningitis, untreated visceral leishmaniasis and African sleeping sickness, smallpox, untreated rabies and pneumonic plague, anthrax, Marburg virus, aspergillosis and some other more common diseases all have higher case fatality rates.

Ebola is fragile, and doesn’t last long outside of fluids. Heat UV, and common household bleach and detergents inactivate it. It requires direct contact with body fluids to be transmitted. It is not apocalyptic.

I know it generates page hits, but this fear-mongering is something I would expect from global warmists and other ascientific “progressives”.

F X Muldoon on July 29, 2014 at 7:28 PM

World Health Organization: Ebola Virus

Key facts

Ebola virus disease (EVD), formerly known as Ebola haemorrhagic fever, is a severe, often fatal illness in humans.
EVD outbreaks have a case fatality rate of up to 90%.
EVD outbreaks occur primarily in remote villages in Central and West Africa, near tropical rainforests.
The virus is transmitted to people from wild animals and spreads in the human population through human-to-human transmission.
Fruit bats of the Pteropodidae family are considered to be the natural host of the Ebola virus.
Severely ill patients require intensive supportive care. No licensed specific treatment or vaccine is available for use in people or animals.

thatsafactjack on July 29, 2014 at 7:35 PM

First of all let me state that my faith and trust in the US Government is nil. If the government told me the sun would rise in the morning, I would be unable to sleep that night in fear of perpetual darkness.

But this may be the ONE EXCEPTION. Ebola is deadly but, except from the primary carrier or vector (rat, bat,mouse, shrew, monkey etc.) to secondary carrier (human) is is NOT VERY CONTAGIOUS BECAUSE IT IS NOT AIRBORNE. Because it is not airborne, it must pass from human to human by fluid exchange (mostly blood contamination.)

The problem in Africa is the the vector (rat, bat etc.) has yet to be positively identified. Once it has, deaths will decline dramatically.

In America, we have to only worry about fluid exchange between humans (if somebody just got back from Africa you might think twice before kissing him). The point is that Ebola is so low on the contagion totem poll that US germ warfare specialists (before the US formally discontinuing biological warfare research) rejected Ebola in favor of a much more communicable arbovirus– Eastern Equine Encephalitis (EEE) which has already struck this summer in Massachusetts.

MaiDee on July 29, 2014 at 7:36 PM

Meh, it’s Minnesota. The virus would be bored to death before it did any harm. /

Seriously, there are other health threats that are far more scary. The ones that do serious damage to the food supply for example.

Happy Nomad

No doubt about it. There’s some scary stuff out there.

Btw,it seems we dodged another bullet. The wife and kids of the American doctor who has it recently returned to America…allegedly just before he became ill.

xblade on July 29, 2014 at 7:38 PM

MaiDee on July 29, 2014 at 7:36 PM Sounds like it has limited reach due to the trasmission selectivity. Africa also has lousy healthcare.

sorrowen on July 29, 2014 at 7:40 PM

American officials are, however, advising Americans to be alert but to not fret excessively over the outbreak.

Be alert? BE ALERT? About WHAT ?!? A stranger with a sniffle standing beside you in the subway? Some guy in the back of the sealed airplane with a bad headache? Some child who just threw up on your shoes?

IT. IS. A. VIRUS. You can’t see it or even tell that you’ve got it before IT decides to become fully symptomatic.

Jeebz.

kurtzz3 on July 29, 2014 at 7:41 PM

Ebola is deadly but, except from the primary carrier or vector (rat, bat,mouse, shrew, monkey etc.) to secondary carrier (human) is is NOT VERY CONTAGIOUS BECAUSE IT IS NOT AIRBORNE. Because it is not airborne, it must pass from human to human by fluid exchange (mostly blood contamination.)

MaiDee

Ever seen sweat on a shopping cart handle? How about urine on a toilet seat? Not being AS contagious as airborne doesn’t equate to not very contagious. It’s just less contagious. Know what else isn’t airborne? AIDs. How’s containing that outbreak going? Got it in check yet?

xblade on July 29, 2014 at 7:43 PM

kurtzz3 on July 29, 2014 at 7:41 PM

Oh, and yes I know it is not airborne. I was addressing the idiocy of advising people to “be on the alert”.

kurtzz3 on July 29, 2014 at 7:43 PM

I`ll be aware, but I don`t want to worry. What can I do to stop it if it comes here? I don`t want to live my life in fear and depression. I hate feeling that way.

ThePrez on July 29, 2014 at 7:44 PM

WHO: Transmission

Ebola then spreads in the community through human-to-human transmission, with infection resulting from direct contact (through broken skin or mucous membranes) with the blood, secretions, organs or other bodily fluids of infected people, and indirect contact with environments contaminated with such fluids. Burial ceremonies in which mourners have direct contact with the body of the deceased person can also play a role in the transmission of Ebola. Men who have recovered from the disease can still transmit the virus through their semen for up to 7 weeks after recovery from illness.

thatsafactjack on July 29, 2014 at 7:44 PM

EVD outbreaks have a case fatality rate of up to 90%.

Next time, read the links you post. The key words are “up to”, had you looked at the table, you would have seen the 2007 Uganda outbreak with a 25% case fatality rate, and if you added up all the deaths, and divided by all the cases, including the present outbreak, you would get about 60%. For about the 6th time in the last couple of days, quicker diagnosis and supportive care would would reduce the case fatality rate. While we are on the subject:

Severely ill patients require intensive supportive care. No licensed specific treatment or vaccine is available for use in people or animals.

So what, that is no different than any other haemorrhagic fever like dengue haemorrhagic, Marburg, Lassa, Congo-Crimea, Kyasanur Forest, or yellow fever.

The difference between the US and Sierra Leone, Guinea, and Libera is that even a rural small community hospital has the assets to give the required supportive care, even if they have to send off to the big city to confirm the diagnosis.

F X Muldoon on July 29, 2014 at 7:54 PM

Africa also has lousy healthcare.

sorrowen on July 29, 2014 at 7:40 PM

So will we in a few years.

Happy Nomad on July 29, 2014 at 8:02 PM

F X Muldoon on July 29, 2014 at 7:54 PM

You read terribly invested in your own opinion and defensive. Kindly try to keep a civil tongue in your head.

I did read the entire page from the World Health Organization. I’m not the one claiming ‘only 60%’ as you’ve posted, according to you “For about the 6th time in the last couple of days…” that it’s “only 60%”, or making snide comments to other commenters when they disagree with that figure.

WHO Table of Chronology of previous Ebola virus disease.

Table: Chronology of previous Ebola virus disease outbreaks

Year Country Ebolavirus species Cases Deaths Case fatality
2012 Democratic Republic of Congo Bundibugyo 57 29 51%
2012 Uganda Sudan 7 4 57%
2012 Uganda Sudan 24 17 71%
2011 Uganda Sudan 1 1 100%
2008 Democratic Republic of Congo Zaire 32 14 44%
2007 Uganda Bundibugyo 149 37 25%
2007 Democratic Republic of Congo Zaire 264 187 71%
2005 Congo Zaire 12 10 83%
2004 Sudan Sudan 17 7 41%
2003 (Nov-Dec) Congo Zaire 35 29 83%
2003 (Jan-Apr) Congo Zaire 143 128 90%
2001-2002 Congo Zaire 59 44 75%
2001-2002 Gabon Zaire 65 53 82%
2000 Uganda Sudan 425 224 53%
1996 South Africa (ex-Gabon) Zaire 1 1 100%
1996 (Jul-Dec) Gabon Zaire 60 45 75%
1996 (Jan-Apr) Gabon Zaire 31 21 68%
1995 Democratic Republic of Congo Zaire 315 254 81%
1994 Cote d’Ivoire Taï Forest 1 0 0%
1994 Gabon Zaire 52 31 60%
1979 Sudan Sudan 34 22 65%
1977 Democratic Republic of Congo Zaire 1 1 100%
1976 Sudan Sudan 284 151 53%
1976 Democratic Republic of Congo Zaire 318 280 88%

Perhaps that will settle the question for you, once and for all. Simple and elegant solution. wouldn’t you agree?

Now, if you want to dispute these figures, contact the World Health Organization.

thatsafactjack on July 29, 2014 at 8:03 PM

American health officials don’t want you to worry about the worst Ebola outbreak ever

Praise Zeus! Now I can go back to worrying about real threats, like global warming and income disparity.

Nomennovum on July 29, 2014 at 8:04 PM

Ever seen sweat on a shopping cart handle? How about urine on a toilet seat?

I don’t know about you, but if I am going to use a public can, I look to see if there is anything on the seat, and as Ebola is inactivated by drying, unless you sit in a puddle, there is no risk. As far as the sweat goes, you can wear gloves or wipe the handle down with a disinfectant wipe if you are that paranoid, but people with Ebola are generally not out shopping.

I`ll be aware, but I don`t want to worry. What can I do to stop it if it comes here? I don`t want to live my life in fear and depression. I hate feeling that way.

Prez, unless you are planning on mucking about in the blood, and other goo from an infected person, stop worrying. As MaiDee pointed out, the infectivity is so low it was rejected as a bioweapon.

F X Muldoon on July 29, 2014 at 8:08 PM

American health officials don’t want you to worry about the [whatever deadly virus] outbreak

So, how many end-of-the-world movies start with those very words?

Nomennovum on July 29, 2014 at 8:10 PM

Perhaps that will settle the question for you, once and for all. Simple and elegant solution. wouldn’t you agree?

Where do you think I got the numbers I derived 60% from?

Now add up the deaths in that table plus the recent ones, divide it by the number of cases in the table plus the recent ones, and tell me what number you come up with for the total case fatality rate.

I’m not defensive by any means, but I am tired of the same outbreak from 2003 being touted as the actual case fatality rate. If you are going to continue to cherry pick like that, you might as well pick the isolated cases and claim either a 100%% case fatality rate, or a 0% case fatality rate.

F X Muldoon on July 29, 2014 at 8:16 PM

Nothing to worry about? Probably. Maybe. But just consider this nightmare scenario tweeted out yesterday by Rick Wilson.

flipflop on July 29, 2014 at 8:17 PM

F X Muldoon on July 29, 2014 at 8:16 PM

I note you seem to discount the 88% fatality rate in Zaire in 1996, the 90%, again in Zaire in 2003, Zaire 2007 at 71%, Uganda in 2012 71%.

These figures suggest to me that mortality rate varies. It must to the WHO, too, since they post specifically “Up to 90% fatality rate”, rather than averaging to the 60% default.

Further, so little is known about this disease as pertains to varying populations, like large populations of elderly people, people with compromised immune systems, people with pre-existing conditions, that even the WHO declines to say what rates could reasonably be expected in urban setting where people are in close proximity should an outbreak occur.

And everyone is praying that this virus, like so many others before it, doesn’t mutate into an airborne variety, just as WHO recently released information that MERS is possibly airborne.

thatsafactjack on July 29, 2014 at 8:27 PM

How long is Ebola active on a surface…like a public toilet or a clinic countertop?

“HOST RANGE: Humans, various monkey species, chimpanzees, gorillas, baboons, and duikers (1-3, 15, 16, 18, 21-23). The Ebola virus genome was recently discovered in two species of rodents and one species of shrew living in forest border areas, raising the possibility that these animals may be intermediary hosts (24). Other studies of the virus have been done using guinea pig models (25). A survey of small vertebrates captured during the 2001 and 2003 outbreaks in Gabon found evidence of asymptomatic infection in three species of fruit bat (Hypsignathus monstrosus, Epomops franqueti, and Myonycteris torquata) (26).

INFECTIOUS DOSE: 1 – 10 aerosolized organisms are sufficient to cause infection in humans (21).

MODE OF TRANSMISSION: In an outbreak, it is hypothesized that the first patient becomes infected as a result of contact with an infected animal (15). Person-to-person transmission occurs via close personal contact with an infected individual or their body fluids during the late stages of infection or after death (1, 2, 15, 27). Nosocomial infections can occur through contact with infected body fluids due to the reuse of unsterilized syringes, needles, or other medical equipment contaminated with these fluids (1, 2). Humans may be infected by handling sick or dead non-human primates and are also at risk when handling the bodies of deceased humans in preparation for funerals, suggesting possible transmission through aerosol droplets (2, 6, 28).

In the laboratory, infection through small-particle aerosols has been demonstrated in primates, and airborne spread among humans is strongly suspected, although it has not yet been conclusively demonstrated (1, 6, 13). The importance of this route of transmission is not clear. Poor hygienic conditions can aid the spread of the virus (6).

INCUBATION PERIOD: Two to 21 days, more often 4 – 9 days (1, 13, 14).

COMMUNICABILITY: Communicable as long as blood, secretions, organs, or semen contain the virus. Ebola virus has been isolated from semen 61 days after the onset of illness, and transmission through semen has occurred 7 weeks after clinical recovery (1, 2)…”

http://www.phac-aspc.gc.ca/lab-bio/res/psds-ftss/ebola-eng.php

workingclass artist on July 29, 2014 at 8:37 PM

“DRUG SUSCEPTIBILITY: Unknown. S-adenosylhomocysteine hydrolase inhibitors have been found to have complete mortality protection in mice infected with a lethal dose of Ebola virus (30).

DRUG RESISTANCE: There are no known antiviral treatments available for human infections.

SUSCEPTIBILITY TO DISINFECTANTS: Ebola virus is susceptible to sodium hypochlorite, lipid solvents, phenolic disinfectants, peracetic acid, methyl alcohol, ether, sodium deoxycholate, 2% glutaraldehyde, 0.25% Triton X-100, β-propiolactone, 3% acetic acid (pH 2.5), formaldehyde and paraformaldehyde, and detergents such as SDS (20, 21, 31-34).

PHYSICAL INACTIVATION: Ebola are moderately thermolabile and can be inactivated by heating for 30 minutes to 60 minutes at 60ºC, boiling for 5 minutes, gamma irradiation (1.2 x106 rads to 1.27 x106 rads), and/or UV radiation (3, 6, 20, 32, 33).

SURVIVAL OUTSIDE HOST: The virus can survive in liquid or dried material for a number of days (23). Infectivity is found to be stable at room temperature or at 4°C for several days, and indefinitely stable at -70°C (6, 20). Infectivity can be preserved by lyophilization….”

http://www.phac-aspc.gc.ca/lab-bio/res/psds-ftss/ebola-eng.php

workingclass artist on July 29, 2014 at 8:40 PM

workingclass artist on July 29, 2014 at 8:40 PM

Excellent research on you part. Very informative and illuminating. Thank you. I’ve bookmarked your links.

thatsafactjack on July 29, 2014 at 8:49 PM

I note you seem to discount the 88% fatality rate in Zaire in 1996, the 90%, again in Zaire in 2003, Zaire 2007 at 71%, Uganda in 2012 71%.

No, I don’t discount them, they are included in the total, that is the way epidemiology works, particularly for rare diseases like Ebola, because, as you yourself point out (as have I) that there are other factors that may contribute to a local increase or decrease in the case fatality rate. The aggregate, therefore, represents a truer picture of the case fatality rate across a broader population.

Picking one and calling it the true case fatality rate is no different than saying the case fatality rate of polio in the US is 27% because it was that in 1916.

…that even the WHO declines to say what rates could reasonably be expected in urban setting where people are in close proximity should an outbreak occur.

The present outbreak includes at least 73 cases and 37 deaths (case fatality rate of 50.7%) in Conarky, Guinea, which has a population density of 9,600 people per square mile (a little less than that of Miami, so there is one estimate.

F X Muldoon on July 29, 2014 at 8:51 PM

All in DC should get it, all the traitors of the Land of Laws anyway.

Schadenfreude on July 29, 2014 at 8:54 PM

Most of these ebola epidemics burn themselves out more quickly than this, don’t they? Is it because they’re usually more rural than this one?

Shay on July 29, 2014 at 9:00 PM

F X Muldoon on July 29, 2014 at 8:51 PM

You still can’t climb down, even in the face of evidence from the researchers leading the world in researching this virus, and you’re still determined to try and dictate how their own research is interpreted to suit your own argument, essentially trying to rewrite what these organizations have put in print.

That’s seriously invested in being ‘right’ on the internet, I’ll give you that.

thatsafactjack on July 29, 2014 at 9:00 PM

Pan- African Airline Suspends Flights To Ebola Hit Countries

Since March, there have been 1,201 cases of Ebola and 672 deaths in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone, according to the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Ebola can fell victims within days, causing severe fever and muscle pain, vomiting, diarrhoea and, in some cases, organ failure and unstoppable bleeding.

The highly contagious and often fatal disease spreads among humans via bodily fluids, including sweat, meaning one can get sick from touching an infected person.

With no vaccine, patients believed to have caught the virus must be isolated to prevent further contagion.

thatsafactjack on July 29, 2014 at 9:04 PM

You still can’t climb down, even in the face of evidence from the researchers leading the world in researching this virus, and you’re still determined to try and dictate how their own research is interpreted to suit your own argument, essentially trying to rewrite what these organizations have put in print.

A swing and a miss, even when I agree with one of your points, you are refusing even to try to understand basic epidemiology, and I have no idea why you are bitterly clinging to 90% as a shibboleth.

The case fatality rate for pneumonia in the US is up to 50 % in the elderly, but only 5-7% overall. See how that works ? Different populations will have different case fatality rates, but the total gives a better risk estimate for a broad population. Basic epidemiology, I am not making anything up.

That’s seriously invested in being ‘right’ on the internet, I’ll give you that.

Yeah, I’d say that is a failure of introspection on your part.

F X Muldoon on July 29, 2014 at 9:30 PM

Ebola is not the most contagious disease. Mainly a combination of not being airborne, not being contagious during incubation, and killing the hosts too quickly for them to infect other people.

However, I’m not as sure that the US would be so immune to this kind of disease. Primarily because of the lack of experience with it. Consider the American man in question, he got it while caring for his sister, who was sick with Ebola. He didn’t realize it, despite being in a country with an ongoing Ebola crisis.

Assume a family member, a friend, or even a strange suddenly collapsed with blood coming from his nose. Assume you have not be reading about events in some obscure African country. Would you think “Ebola! Quick, quarantine him!” Or would you think “Bloody nose and a fainting spell – did he hit his face?” Or maybe “What does he have, a bad case of the flu? Let’s help him and clean off this blood on his face.”

Followed by you getting ill, and then passing it on.

Will it devastate the country? Of course not. But the first few thousand who die before we figure out what is happening might not be comforted by that knowledge.

Sackett on July 29, 2014 at 10:19 PM

You get the feeling we’re being prepped for some very bad news.
formwiz on July 29, 2014 at 7:02 PM

Yup, it does kinda read like the opening chapter of “The Stand”.

whatcat on July 29, 2014 at 10:21 PM

All in DC should get it, all the traitors of the Land of Laws anyway.
Schadenfreude on July 29, 2014 at 8:54 PM

The disease is horrific – I wouldn’t wish it on anyone, especially Americans, Schad. But I understand the underlying gist of what you mean.

whatcat on July 29, 2014 at 10:26 PM

Ebola Outbreak: Deadly Foreign Diseases Are ‘Potential Major Threat’ Says Chief Scientist

Deadly foreign diseases like Ebola are a ‘potential major threat’ to Britain, the government’s chief scientist has warned, as public health officials urged doctors to watch for signs that the virus has spread to the UK.

The disease, which can be fatal for up to 90 per cent of infected victims, has now killed more than 670 people across Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone.

Public Health England has issued an urgent warning to doctors to watch for signs of the lethal disease after an infected man was allowed to travel through an international hub. They said the virus was ‘clearly not under control.’

In an interview with The Telegraph Sir Mark Walport, the government’s Chief Scientific Advisor, said that the increasingly ‘interconnected’ world was placing Britons at risk.

“The UK is fortunate in its geographical position. We’re an island,” he said.

The death of American Patrick Sawyer in Lagos, Nigeria, has led to fears that the virus could spread beyond Africa.

Mr Sawyer, 40, had travelled from his home of Minnesota to attend the funeral of his sister, who died from Ebola. But it is unclear how he was allowed to board multiple international flights after he had started presenting symptoms.

Despite vomiting and suffering from diarrhoea, the Liberian Finance Ministry employee, was able to fly from Liberia, via Ghana, and Togo, before arriving in Nigeria, where he died. Experts say he could have passed on the disease to anyone sat near him or who used the same toilet on one of the planes and are now trying to trace fellow passengers.

thatsafactjack on July 29, 2014 at 10:28 PM

Read a really good article on BBC about the original Belgian guy who went down with a team back in the 60s. Not only was the history very interesting, but the doctor’s present-day comments were very informative. Standing out the most, and giving me peace of mind here in the States:

“We shouldn’t forget that this is a disease of poverty, of dysfunctional health systems – and of distrust.”

Scopper on July 29, 2014 at 10:32 PM

Virus Type 1967-2008 Total Cases # Deaths % Deaths

Marburg 548 478 87.22
Ebola-Sudan 858 545 63.52
Ebola-Zaire 1554 943 60.68

TOTALS 2960 1966 66.42

Worst outbreaks occurred in 2005 in Angola where 350-391 died or 89.52%

There are three strains of African filoviruses 1-Marburg,2 Ebola-Sudan and 3 Ebola-Zaire.

Sources CDC and WHO.

Figures presented without political comment.

MaiDee on July 29, 2014 at 10:56 PM

My figures were chopped up when I sent them.

1 Marburg killed 478-548 or 87.22%
2 Ebola-Sudan killed 545-858 or 63.62%
3 Ebola-Zaire killed 943-1554 or 60.68%

Total killed by all 3 years 1967-2008 were 1,966 out of 2,960=66.42%

MaiDee on July 29, 2014 at 11:03 PM

My figures were chopped up when I sent them.

1 Marburg killed 478-548 or 87.22%
2 Ebola-Sudan killed 545-858 or 63.62%
3 Ebola-Zaire killed 943-1554 or 60.68%

Total killed by all 3 (years 1967-2008) were 1,966 out of 2,960=66.42%

MaiDee on July 29, 2014 at 11:05 PM

American officials are, however, advising Americans to be alert but to not fret excessively over the outbreak.

That’s why they said about the swine flu. My father contracted it while fighting an autoimmune disorder and died two months later.

Hat Trick on July 30, 2014 at 7:57 AM

Pork-Chop on July 29, 2014 at 7:10 PM

I’ve been mentioning that for three weeks.

dogsoldier on July 30, 2014 at 9:02 AM

MaiDee on July 29, 2014 at 11:05 PM

They repot the current strain kills 90%

dogsoldier on July 30, 2014 at 9:03 AM

report – sorry for the typo.

dogsoldier on July 30, 2014 at 9:04 AM

dogsoldier on July 30, 2014 at 9:03 AM

It is difficult 5to get accurate statistics on a developing, fluid outbreak which is still ongoing.

The latest figures I have are 1202 cases and 673 deaths (Wikipedia at 7-23-2014) for a death %age of 55.99%. But this is misleading since the figure is not final. Example: Maybe many of the people counting as living have since died. On the other hand, it is often the case that some of the dead may have been double counted. Also the figures are not static. Many more cases will be added (as well as deaths.) It is best to wait until the outbreak is finished to get an accurate count.

My best guess is that the final figures will approximate the previous statistics that 2 out of e4very 3 people infected will die.

MaiDee on July 30, 2014 at 9:32 AM

I sincerely hope you are correct, MaiDee. Several UK papers had reports on the Doctor and the nurses that dies and claimed they are seeing 90% mortality rate.

dogsoldier on July 30, 2014 at 11:20 AM