Rasmussen: 58% of Republicans want Obama impeached — but 58% overall oppose it

posted at 11:21 am on July 15, 2014 by Allahpundit

A complement to yesterday’s YouGov poll via Becket Adams, in case you were reluctant to draw firm conclusions based on one data set. (Which is wise.) YouGov polled adults whereas Rasmussen polled likely voters, but the results are largely the same. Most Republicans like the idea of removing The One from office, but not nearly enough to offset the number of Democrats and independents who don’t.

Fifty-two percent (52%) of voters believe it would be bad for the United States if some members of Congress seek to impeach Obama, and even more (56%) think it would be bad for the Republican Party if an impeachment effort is made…

Fifty-five percent (55%) of voters say electing an opposition Congress is the better way for opponents to halt or change the president’s policies. Just 15% think impeachment is the better way for opponents to go, and even fewer (12%) favor lawsuits challenging the president’s actions like the ones House Speaker John Boehner is now championing…

Fifty-eight percent (58%) of Republicans think the president should be impeached and removed from office. Eighty-seven percent (87%) of Democrats and 52% of voters not affiliated with either major party disagree…

Fifty-two percent (52%) of GOP voters agree with 53% of Democrats and 60% of unaffiliateds that electing an opposition Congress is the better way to halt or change the president’s policies.

Overall, 32 percent support impeachment versus 58 percent who don’t. In the YouGov poll, 32 percent supported it versus 68 percent who didn’t, although 12 percent within the latter group thought Obama had committed offenses worthy of impeachment. If you exclude them, YouGov’s topline numbers are almost identical to Rasmussen’s. Even on the basic question of whether Obama’s been more or less faithful to the Constitution than most other presidents, irrespective of whether he should be impeached or not, Rasmussen finds a majority who think O’s been as good or even better than his predecessors. Fifty-two percent say he’s either more faithful (22 percent) or equally faithful (30 percent) to the Constitution; 44 percent say he’s less faithful.

It could be that these numbers will change as circumstances do, of course. If the GOP falls flat in November and fails to retake the Senate, maybe some Republican voters who are desperate to rein in O will shift to impeachment now that all electoral attempts have failed. Or maybe Obama will engage in an unusually high-profile executive power grab on a hot button issue — like, say, a mass amnesty? — that alienates independents and shrinks the margin that currently opposes impeachment. Republicans in Congress wouldn’t pursue something as quixotic as impeachment, though, without being very confident that it would succeed. Even if the public ended up being split 50/50, that wouldn’t be nearly enough to scare Senate Democrats into voting for removal; you’d need Obama’s public support to truly crater to scare Dems enough to remove their own guy. Probably not even a mass amnesty would do it, I’m sorry to say.

Exit question via Robert Tracinski: Should we follow the “Mencken dictum” on this?

The American people heard these arguments, and they went with the other guy. So we have to remember H.L. Mencken’s dictum: the people know what they want and deserve to get it good and hard. They voted for Obama, they got him, and now they have to lump it. If they don’t like the results, they can choose better next time.

I like that in principle. It’s the “let it burn” approach to government: If the public wants Obama-style liberalism, let’s get out of their way and let ‘em have it and see how it works out for them. We’re already seeing how it works abroad; it may take longer at home, but eventually they’ll learn some hard, hard lessons about unfunded liabilities. The problem with the Mencken approach, though, is that it ends up making constitutional limits on executive power a function of popular will (or, more accurately, public complacency). In theory, if the public wanted Obama to dissolve Congress and pass laws by White House edict, we should let him do it in the spirit of “let it burn.” That’s fine, but that’s not the system we have. If you want that system, repeal the Constitution first. Until then, as George Will argued, it’s up to federal judges to police those constitutional limits just as they’ve done for 200 years. That’s why, although I realize that Boehner’s lawsuit is mainly a political stunt, I appreciate it as an attempt to force the judiciary to do its job here. If they want to punt their responsibilities back to the voters by insisting that this question be settled at the polls, okay, but let’s at least give them the option of stepping up.


Related Posts:

Breaking on Hot Air

Blowback

Note from Hot Air management: This section is for comments from Hot Air's community of registered readers. Please don't assume that Hot Air management agrees with or otherwise endorses any particular comment just because we let it stand. A reminder: Anyone who fails to comply with our terms of use may lose their posting privilege.

Trackbacks/Pings

Trackback URL

Comments

Comment pages: 1 2

Okay genius, so what’s the point in impeachment (the easy part) if the Senate doesn’t convict? It would be a gift to the Democrats even bigger than offering up John McCain as his opponent in 2008.

The fllthy lazy stupid bastard suddenly would be a black martyred victim of partisan politics. What is the point in that?

Happy Nomad on July 15, 2014 at 1:00 PM

Ah, we’re back to this again, are we?

Not today. Not this battle. Maybe the next battle, maybe another day. Any day but today. Any battle but this one.

Lather, rinse, repeat.

Midas on July 15, 2014 at 1:12 PM

Palin is now in self exile on Elba.

Actually I am looking right at Elba from the terrazza of my home in Tuscany. What a beautiful time of the year to be here.

Salute “Brutta figura,” It sucks to be a corrupt RINO like you!

Jayrae on July 15, 2014 at 1:16 PM

He definitely should be impeached. He’s a disgrace to the office Unfortunately our congress and senate is so corrupt it won’t happen yet.

MCGIRV on July 15, 2014 at 1:17 PM

58% of Republicans want Obama impeached and the other 42% are lying.

Herb on July 15, 2014 at 1:18 PM

The fllthy lazy stupid bastard suddenly would be a black martyred victim of partisan politics. What is the point in that?

Happy Nomad on July 15, 2014 at 1:00 PM

And you can take this same meme and apply it to every single DimocRat in Congress and Eric Holder as well, as reason to rollover and not fight against a damn thing from here on out.

Meople on July 15, 2014 at 1:18 PM

Any Republican who does not support impeachment has given up on movement conservatism.

William F. Buckley in 1955:

if NATIONAL REVIEW is superfluous, it is so for very different reasons: It stands athwart history, yelling Stop, at a time when no one is inclined to do so, or to have much patience with those who so urge it.

This small government philosophy was and was put into national political action through a coalition developed by Ronald Reagan. At his inaugural address in January 1981.

government is not the solution to our problem; government is the problem.

If Republicans don’t have the political courage to tell Obama to stop, meaning at least 50% vote for impeachment in the House, then conservatism is lost for the next generation. It will be big government liberalism for at least 40 years no matter who is elected President in 2016 because the GOP will be complicit. Impeachment is a hill worth fighting on.

sauldalinsky on July 15, 2014 at 1:28 PM

If Republicans don’t have the political courage to tell Obama to stop, meaning at least 50% vote for impeachment in the House, then conservatism is lost for the next generation. It will be big government liberalism for at least 40 years no matter who is elected President in 2016 because the GOP will be complicit. Impeachment is a hill worth fighting on.

sauldalinsky on July 15, 2014 at 1:28 PM

You really think that a 50% vote for impeachment in the House would restrain the REB in any small way?

I think he would double down.

slickwillie2001 on July 15, 2014 at 1:35 PM

This country is so screwed.Eff the GOP.Third party time to at least screw up the Republicans efforts to kiss Democrap derriere.

redware on July 15, 2014 at 1:36 PM

If Republicans don’t have the political courage to tell Obama to stop, meaning at least 50% vote for impeachment in the House, then conservatism is lost for the next generation. It will be big government liberalism for at least 40 years no matter who is elected President in 2016 because the GOP will be complicit. Impeachment is a hill worth fighting on.

sauldalinsky on July 15, 2014 at 1:28 PM

That’s exactly what’s happening now. The GOP IS complicit, and has completely abandoned Conservative principles and the Conservative base of the party. That’s a FACT.

Meople on July 15, 2014 at 1:38 PM

to Barry O,

Don’t worry about that 60% of republicans, Barry. The republican establishment are very busy putting out the word that y0u have done nothing illegal. They’ll protect you. And they are working on this new strategy of calling out their grass roots supporters as racist. They have their best people working with the dems on creating a synergy between the racism libel and calling for your impeachment. Don’t worry Barry, the republican leaders got your back.

BoxHead1 on July 15, 2014 at 1:44 PM

to Barry O,

Don’t worry about that 60% of republicans, Barry. The republican establishment are very busy putting out the word that y0u have done nothing illegal. They’ll protect you. And they are working on this new strategy of calling out their grass roots supporters as racist. They have their best people working with the dems on creating a synergy between the racism libel and calling for your impeachment. Don’t worry Barry, the republican leaders got your back.

BoxHead1 on July 15, 2014 at 1:44 PM

Truth, right there.

Meople on July 15, 2014 at 1:46 PM

So the total percentage of support for impeachment is less than ten points below the total percentage of Obama job approval (per Gallup).

Not a great place for any president to be.

But remember, those calling for impeachment are EXTREME™.

Are those who approve of Obama also EXTREME™?

Missy on July 15, 2014 at 2:35 PM

I’ve read some of the comments on the Clinton impeachment. Clinton was impeached, regardless of what the duplicitous Democrats say, because he lied, under oath, to a grand jury. Now, they say it was only about sex. No, it was about sexual harassment, which Democrats passed and Clinton signed, sort of like the Religious Freedom Restoration Act. Now, if you put the 2 of them together, you begin to see a pattern.

bflat879 on July 15, 2014 at 2:52 PM

Senate Budget Committee ranking member Sen. Jeff Sessions (R-AL) has warned all of his colleagues in Congress that President Barack Obama’s new immigration strategy—his plans to legalize millions of illegal alien adults through executive power—could destroy America as we know it.

“I write to inform you of a development that threatens the foundation of our constitutional Republic,” Sessions, Congress’s top immigration hawk, wrote in a letter that was hand-delivered to all 535 members of Congress on Monday and provided exclusively to Breitbart News.

http://www.breitbart.com/Big-Government/2014/07/14/EXCLUSIVE-Sessions-Warns-All-Of-Congress-Obama-s-New-Immigration-Strategy-Threatens-Foundation-Of-Our-Constitutional-Republic

bluefox on July 15, 2014 at 2:55 PM

So most Republicans agree with West and Palin. Good to see.

DaMav on July 15, 2014 at 3:12 PM

Fifty-two percent (52%) of GOP voters agree with 53% of Democrats and 60% of unaffiliateds that electing an opposition Congress is the better way to halt or change the president’s policies.

What the hell is an “opposition Congress”?
Are these 53% of Democrats willing to vote R in the mid-terms to “halt or change the president’s policies”? Do the 52% of GOP voters really think it matters?
These are the people who assume Obama knows what he’s talking about when he says “The Republican Congress…..”
These people can’t tell you who their 2 senators are, much less who their representative in the House is.
These are the people that keep electing Reid, McVain, Grahamnesty, Pelosi, Cochran, et. al., no matter WHO is in the WH.
These are the people that, if they even vote in the mid-terms, vote straight ticket, no matter who is on it.
Be afraid, very afraid, for these are the Low Info Voters, and the fate of our country is in their hands.

leftamark on July 15, 2014 at 4:44 PM

The Democrat party doesn’t piss on their base unlike the Republicans . 70% of Republicans support impeaching Obama. The rest live in fear of the media and believe everything the GOP establishment tells them .

Unaffiliated4P on July 15, 2014 at 6:57 PM

Impeachment, and certainly conviction & removal, may be politically unfeasible at present. But that is not to say that its serious discussion has no place in the public conscience, if only as a backdrop marker for Obama’s serial past abuses of office and partial check on future abuses. And imagine the future appearance of a truly outrageous smoking gun traceable directly to arising out of say, the IRS, Benghazi or border invasion travesties. The narrative could then easily shift to issues of how the Democrats are blocking a clearly necessary political procedure. Under those changed circumstances, Sarah Palin’s message would have once again proven articulate, accurate, fearless and prescient.

Barnestormer on July 15, 2014 at 7:00 PM

70% of Republicans support replacing the corrupt gopE.

Jayrae on July 15, 2014 at 7:19 PM

Fifty-two percent (52%) of GOP voters agree with 53% of Democrats and 60% of unaffiliateds that electing an opposition Congress is the better way to halt or change the president’s policies.

If this is so, we can expect a Republican House and a Republican Senate in November.

But I’m not so confident that the people will do that.

And, my question, remains: Impeachment: If not now, when? Obama is the most corrupt, totalitarian, fascist ever to occupy the White House. Even Jonathan Turley believes Obama has driven this country to a “Constitutional tipping point.”

Republicans ought to make the case for impeachment, whether they do it or not in the end; to point out the obvious criminality of this White House and their palace guard in the media and the DoJ, is only a first step, but it is a necessary step. To do otherwise proves to the American people that the GOP are hypocrites, who blow a lot of hot air about the Constitution, but in the end, care nothing about the Constitution at all.

mountainaires on July 16, 2014 at 8:16 AM

I couldn’t care less what a majority of people in an opinion poll WANT. This is not about public opinion. This is about whether the U.S. is a nation of laws, or of influence.

That there is enough reason to pursue impeachment is the only question of merit. For Congress to balk because of potential political ramifications is not simply cowardly, it is illegal in the face of their charge as a check and balance against a despotic Executive branch.

Any counter argument which addresses this issue on its face is welcome. Any which concerns itself with tangential worries are invalid.

It does not get more difficult than that.

Freelancer on July 16, 2014 at 12:28 PM

Comment pages: 1 2