Skip to 4:15 for the key bit. “Let’s be decent and take care of the kids while they’re here,” he finally says in exasperation. One point I haven’t seen addressed in the hubbub over his charity effort is whether he’s planning the upcoming shipment of supplies as a one-time show of goodwill or as an ongoing mission of mercy to the border, with shipments at regular intervals. If it’s the latter, I hope he knows what he’s getting into. Anecdotal reports suggest there are a lot of kids who’ll soon be needing teddy bears and soccer balls. Quote one comes from Ruben Navarrette:

My sources tell me that it is well-known that in the Rio Grande Valley, there are tens or even hundreds of thousands of people from Central America — mostly women and children — in northern Mexico right now, waiting for their chance to cross into the United States.

We should stop looking for an endpoint. This story has no end in sight.

As a journalist, every week, I start with a dozen new angles to explore. By the beginning of next week, there will be a dozen more. Make no mistake. We will be dealing with this crisis not for weeks or months but probably for years. People will keep coming.

Quote two comes from Fox News reporter Jana Winter, who accompanied Louie Gohmert recently on a trip to the border:

“You’re going to be out here a long time,” Fernando, an El Salvadoran child, told FoxNews.com shortly after surrendering to Border Patrol authorities after midnight Saturday. “There are thousands of us.”

FoxNews.com witnessed the seemingly endless parade of illegal immigrants as they turned themselves in to agents and climbed into the vans. One mother teared up when telling FoxNews.com of her family’s perilous journey from Honduras. Some said the trip took as little as two days, others said they’d been traveling for months. In groups of 12 or more, they were then taken to the bus set up in a desolate area at the intersection of unlit dirt roads in Rincon Village along the river for initial processing under the full Texas summer moon.

“They just keep on coming,” one Border Patrol source said.

They’re coming, whether or not there are any surplus pairs of 1791 jeans waiting for them. And the reason they’ll keep coming, as Mickey Kaus says, is simple: It’s because the left has no intention of enforcing the border, even though they’ve spent the past 18 months promising that they’ll get serious about security just as soon as Republicans agree to get serious about legalization. That’s the lie at the heart of comprehensive immigration reform, in Kaus’s phrasing. Given a stark opportunity with this border crisis to show that they really will keep illegals out going forward in exchange for amnesty for those who are already here, immigration activists instead scared Obama away from the obvious legislative patch, allowing summary deportations for children from noncontiguous countries like those in Central America. This should be the end of comprehensive immigration reform; it’s a fraud and now everyone knows it, which leaves “security first” as the only option for the GOP — in theory. In practice, though, comprehensive reform will never die. Kaus is right (again) that, whether or not it’s true that Latino voters will forever support amnesty in the name of racial solidarity, our political class obviously believes that it’s true. And since the Latino demographic will only grow, that means the “solution” to this problem will always involve an amnesty component. In a way, it’s like impeachment: You’d need to see wide public opinion turn so sour on illegal immigration, notwithstanding Latino support for it, that even Democrats would start to feel pressure to pander to border hawks with a security-only bill rather than to Latinos with comprehensive reform. We’re not even close to being there yet. But after another 300,000 or 500,000 illegals from Central America have come across, who knows?