I can’t believe he didn’t get hauled off to jail. Which is a really depressing realization to have about one’s free country. But in this clip, which has gotten 4 million views in a week, a trucker gets pulled over by an Illinois State Trooper*. Why? The trooper sped past him well over the speed limit, according to the trucker, on his phone, on a wet road. So, the trucker laid on the horn.

He was then, of course, pulled over for “unlawful use of a horn” or some such nonsense, which is where the video picks up. I want to offer a caveat on this because no one seems to have reported it out and found the truck driver, but it has been posted at Esquire and Road & Track, and it so delighted me, I had to show it to you. The trooper takes the traditional tack with him for a few minutes before the trucker tells him he has him speeding on his dash cam video. The trucker is also obviously extremely sure he’s got all his papers and what-not in order and can withstand scrutiny. He does withstand it, and the lecture he gives this trooper, and the trooper’s cowed response— delicious:

Good for him for backing off once caught instead of doubling down, though one would hope these guys would just consider themselves subject to the same laws as the rest of us in the first place.

*per the YouTube description

In other good freedom of transportation news, Virginia has lifted its ban on Uber and Lyft ride services (which I had been using illicitly):

The CEA [Consumer Electronics Association], which had lobbied against the ban alongside other tech organizations, was first out with a response to the news, even before the official releases have come out. We’ll be reporting more as the story develops.

“We are encouraged by reports that the Virginia Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV) is taking steps to allow innovative transportation network providers Uber and Lyft to operate in the Commonwealth,” said Gary Shapiro, president and CEO of the CEA in the release. “As we noted from the moment the DMV issued a ‘cease-and-desist’ order to these companies, denying them the ability to operate in Virginia is anti-consumer, anti-jobs and directly at odds with Virginia’s reputation as a pro-business state.”

Uber and Lyft aren’t totally out of the woods yet. Talks are ongoing about finding a solution to the regulatory issues presented by how the companies operate, but it’s definitely a positive sign for those who are fans of the ride-share app system.